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February 25, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

pF5Y tfSE E WV 6 E CALL(WDA LY
Coed conflict
While many anxious residents waited for their names to be called at
Wednesday night's dorm lottery at South Quad, freshperson Alexan-
dra Callam was in for a bit of a surprise - she was given a male
roommate. It seems Callam, nicknamed Alex, had her name mixed in
with the male resident's lottery instead of the all-woman Bush House.
The dorm staff corrected their mistake and Callam was assured that
she would have a place to stay in the dorm next door -with a roommate
of the same gender.
Take ten
The volunteer army has its skeptics today, but ten years ago, in
February, 1969, Oregon's Senator Robert Packwood came to town to
seek student support for a movement to create a volunteer army. "We
have to convince public opinion that a volunteer army is desirable and
would work," Packwood said during a Diag speech. "Until 1940, ex-
cept for the Civil War and World War I, this country always had a
professional army, and the military never took over," Packwood
argued.
H S
Happenings
SUNDAY
FILMS
Children's Films-The Rescuers, 1 p.m., Aaron Deroy Studio
Theatre.
Cinean II-The Lords of Flatbush, 7, 9p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild-A Streetcar Named Desire, 7, 9:15 p.m., Old Arch.
Aud:
PERFORMANCES
Music School-viola recital, Margaret Lang, 2 p.m., Recital Hall;
cello recital, Carol Shiffler, 4 p.m., Recital Hall; faculty piano recital,
Mary Jean Eckerle, 6 p.m., Recital Hall; voice recital, Susan Mat-
thews, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; horn students recital, 8 p.m., Stearns.
Eva Jessye Afr-American Music Series-Music by Black
American composers, 4 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Russian Arts Festival/Music School-"An Afternoon of Russian
Song," 4p.m., Art Museum.
PTP-William Windom, An Evening of Thurber, 7 p.m., Power
Center.
Major Events-Al Jarreau, with special guest Ramsey Lewis, 8
p.m., Hill AudE
LECTURES
Kelsey Museum-galley talk, Lynn Stowell, "Carthage Then and
Now," 2 p.m., Kelsey Museum.
Saint Mary's Chapel-Lenten Lecture Series, Bishop Thomas
Gumbleton, "The Meaning of Lent," 7:30 p.m., St. Mary's Student
Chapel.
MEETINGS
Women in Action-2 p.m., 1861 Shirley Lane, Apt. A4, Village
Green Apts.
SPORTS
Men's Gymnastics-Michigan vs. Iowa, 2 p.m., Crisler Arena.
MISCELLANEOUS
T'ai C'hi-workshop, 10 a.m., Earhart Clubhouse, 82 Greenhills
Drive.
Institute for the Study of Mental Retardation and Related
Disabilities-publication open house, meeting with authors of Parents
on the Team, 2 p.m., 130 S. First St.
Folklore Society-square dance, 8 p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill.
MONDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild-Ivan the Terrible, part Ii, 7 p.m., Old Arch. &
Design Bldg.
Women's Studies-Women's Health Film, 7 p.m., Aud. 3, MLB.
Dance-Magda Saleh, of Cairo Ballet, film and lecture on Egyptian
Folkd Dances, 8 p.m., Power Center.
PERFORMANCES
Music School-Univ. of Iowa Piano Trio, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Organ Recital-George Baker, DMA, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Choral Conducting Recital-Anne Reisner, MM, Mozart Vesperae
Solennes de Confessore, Motet of Byrd; Ariel Ramirez, Misa Criolla, 8
p.m., Christian Reformed Church, 1717 Broadway.
Jazz Improvisation-Ted Piltzecher, vibraphonist, concert and
clinci, 8 p.m., Rehearsal Hall, Moore Bldg.
Stearns Lecture-Concert Series-Russian Melodeclamation,
Edith Freeman, reciter, and Joan Freeman Shwayder, accompanist, 8
p.m., Russian Pageant Theatre: Cady Rm., Stearns Bldg.
Humanities Eng. Dept.-Ars Musica Baroque Orchestra, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Aud.
LECTURES
American Assoc. of Univ. Professors-Sen. Ed Pierce, noon, Rms.
4,5 of Michigan League.
Ctr. of Near Eastern and N. African Studies-Ihsan Bagby, "Per-

sonal Reflections on the Islamic Movement in Egypt," noon, Com
Mons Rm., Lane Hall.
Philosophy Dept.-Willard VanOrman Quine of Harvard Univ.,
"How and Why to Reify," 4 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Marcomolecular Research Center-George B. Butler, Univ. of
Florida, "Polymers and Modified Polymers from Traizolinediones," 4
p,m., 3005 Chem. Bldg.
Nat. Resources/Landscape Architecture-Carl Steinipz, Harvard
Univ., "Stimulating the Implementation of the Massachusetts Scenic
and Recreational Rivers Act: The North River Demonstration," 7:30
p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Lloyd Minority Council-"Criminal Justice Symposium," 8 p.m.,
Lloyd Hall.
Washtenaw County Friend of the Court-Donald t. Haller, cer-
tified marriage and family therapist, "The Rugged Triangle,' 7:30
p.m., Washtenaw County Bldg., Rm. 204.
Ann Arbor Chapter of the Indoor Light Gardneing Society of
Amer.-"Propagation for Your Plants," 8 p.m., Matthai Botanical
Gardens, 1800 North Dixboro Road.
MEETINGS
Mich. Republican Club-mass meeting, 7:30 p.m.; Mich. Union
Assembly Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
Scottish Country Dancing-Xanadu Co-op, 7:30 p.m., 1311 Washt-
enaw.
On the outside
If you thought last week's heat wave was too good to last, you
were right. Look for snow flurries today with a high of 28* and a low
of 16*.

Tolerance towards
Chinese Gov't. urged

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 25, 1979-Page 3
Be a Part of the Big U'-

Join The Daily!

N

BY SARA ANSPACH
Robert Williams, an American civil
rights activist who was exiled from the
United States in 1961 and lived in Cuba
for five years and the People's Republic
of China for three, stressed a need for
tolerance toward the Chinese gover-
nment to a Michigan Union audience
Friday night.
Williams' speech was punctuated
with a string of personal experiences.
S"I've lived a lot of this history we're
talking about, and there's a lot of dif-
ference between what is being said and
what is really happening," said
Williams. The speech by the former
consultant to the University's Center
for Chinese Studies was sponsored by
the U.S.-China People's Friendship
Association.
FOR SIX YEARS Williams served as
the president of the National
Association for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP) chapter in
Monroe, North Carolina during the
1950s, and wasone of the first black
leaders to advocate armed self-defense
for blacks. "Black people were told
they should turn the, other
cheek ... but I had just come back
from the Marines and I wasn't taught to
be a pacifist," Williams said.
Williams' views on armed self-
defense and violence forced him into
exile in 1961. Fidel Castro invited him to
stay in\Cuba where he lived for five
years. In 1966 he went to Peking and
lived for three years among the Chinese
people.
During his stay in China, Williams
became friends with Mao-Tse Tung.
"Chairman Mao is completely different
than they portray him. He was not
dogmatic at all," said Williams. He
described Mao as a friendly, down-to-
earth man who made things simple for
his people to understand.

ACCORDING TO Williams, Mao was
tolerant of other people and ideologies.
"He said to me once, 'We know that you
are not Marxist-Leninist, yet we like
you. The Chinese people like you.
Khruschev is Marxist-Leninist, but we
can't stand him'," Williams said.
Speaking to an audience of 50, which
was made up of many communists and
socialists, Williams said, these
American groups should not be
judgemental of the changes occurring
in the Chinese government. "I'm not
arguing whether they are right or
wrong. I'm arguing that they have a
right to be what they want to be," he
said.
Williams also condemned those who
support either side of the recent
Chinese-Vietnamese War. "I don't want
to see them fight. I think it's tragic.
They say socialism will eliminate war,
then we turn around and see socialist
countries cutting each other's throats."
"BOTH HAVE been friends to me, and
I see them as human beings. It's hurtful
.to me," he continued. Someday,
Williams suggested there may be a
nuclear war between Russia and China.
"Then maybe you'll get your wish of
socialism. Everybody will be equal
then," he said.
Williams suggested that those who
criticize the Chinese should pay more
attention to events in the United States.
"We can tolerate anything here - but
we can't tolerate it in China."
The civil rights activist also men-
tioned racial problems in American
society. "The civil rights movement is
collapsing," he said. "All the gains are
being rolled back. We've got -a class
struggle, yes, but first we've got to take
care of our race problem."
Williams stressed that people, not
"isms" are important. "I feel for
humanity. I don't love theory, I love
practice."

Ella Kazan's

"I

1951

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE
VIVIAN LEIGH and MARLON BRANDO star in Tennessee Williams' prizefight
between Blanche Dubois, a lonely. and decaying escapee from southern
gentility, and Stanley Kowalski, her coarse, brutal and sarcastic brother-
in-law. Brando brings men's undershirts back into vogue-the squalid New
Orleans setting is perfectly rendered. With KARL MALDEN & KIM HUNTER.
Mon: IVAN THE TERRIBLE (Part 11)-free at 7:00 only
Tugs: THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (LAUGHTON)

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:00

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

S
"Rocky" & "The Fonz" in
LORDS OF FLATBUSH
Introducing Sylvester "Rocky" Stallone and Henry "The Fonz" Winkler
in their first starring roles. They steal the show in this nostalgic yet sensitive
film about the world of black leather jackets, rock and roll, stolen hubcaps
in 1950's Brooklyn. Plenty of teenage sex and gum-chewing. (Steven Verona,
1974, 86m)
Plus Short-THE SCARLETT PUMPERNICKELtChuck Jones' tour-de-farce
send*up of the Errol Flynn swashbucklers, with an all-Warners-cartoon-star
cast including Daffy, Sylvester and Melissa Duck.
NEXT-Fri. Sissy Spacek in BADLANDS
TONIGHT at Angell Hall, Aud. A
7:00 & 9:00 $1.50
MANN THEATRESAD MISSION
"VILLAGE WIN 1Adults: $4.00
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER Child: $2.00
T11AE STARRING
Robert
DeNiro
10 Academy
Award
Nominations
SHOWTIMES
f Sat-Sun
.1:00, 4:30,
8:00
Mon-Fri
1:00, 8:00
Nominated for
Best Director, Best Actor
Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor
YOU'LL BELIEVE SHOWTIMES
A MAN CAN FLY Sat-Sun
1:30, 4:15
SUPERM4AN 700, 945
MARLON BRANDO Mon-Fri 1:30,
:rGENE HACKMAN PG 7:00, 9:45

I

Send troops abroad only
in extreme' cases-Mondale

WASHINGTON (AP) - Vice
President Walter Mondale says the
Carter administration has closed the
door on the use of American troops in
'another country "except under the
most extreme, compelling circumstan-
ces."
Whenever a U.S. administration inter-
venes in another country, "the chickens
have come home to roost," Mondale
asserted in an apparent reference to the
use of U.S. troops in combat roles in
other countries.
Asked whether the use of U.S. troops
in the Chinese-Vietnam fighting was
considered a possibility, the vice
president said:
"OF COURSE, we do not want to send
American troops anywhere, except un-
der the most extreme, compelling cir-
cumstances. When you talk about
deploying American troops and risking
American lives, you need the highest,
the very highest set of national
I 4-yr.wold
given 4
years gets
ne wtrial
BROOKHAVEN, Miss. (AP) -
Robert Earl "Bubba" May Jr., the little
14-year-old who faced a 48-year prison
term for armed robbery, spent the first
day of his newly-won freedom yester-
day watching television, a lawyer said.
Meanwhile, another lawyer said that
May's defense may ask for a change of
venue for the boy's Sept. 6 trial.
MAY'S GUILTY pleas to four
charges of armed robbery were set
aside Friday by Circuit Judge Joe
Pigott, who had originally sentenced
the 4-foot-7, 75-pound youth to 48 years
in prison without chance of parole. May
had been held in special quarters at the
state penitentiary's hospital since late
January.
Ron Welch, a lawyer for the
Mississippi Prisoners' Rights Commit-
tee, said he may ask to move the trial
from Brookhaven because of what he
called extensive media coverage of
May's plight. Trial motions must be
filed by Aug. 1.
May's principal attorney, Julia Epps,
said the youngster spent his firstsmor-
ning out of prison watching television in
Brookhaven, Ms. Epps would not say
whether the boy was staying at his
home or somewhere else in this
southern Mississippi town.

priorities to justify such a use of
American manpower."
Mondale did not spell out what com-
pelling circumstances could require the
assignment of U.S. troops to combat
roles in another country. The vice
president was not asked and did not
refer to the stationing of U.S. troops in
such places as West Germany and
South Korea.
Mondale's remarks were made'
Friday to a seminar of editors from the
American Press Institute. The White
House released a transcript of the in-
terview yesterday.

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