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February 02, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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and Sun. 12-5 & 6-8 at Power Center.

Page 2-Friday, February 2, 1979-The Michigan Daily

'U', AFSCME CONTRACT TALKS:
Union presents demands

By RON GIFFORD
Contract negotiations for the
University and the American
Federation of State, County, and
Municipal Employees (AFSCME) met
Wednesday and- union officials presen-
ted their non-economic demands to the
University negotiating team.,
The two sides, which began
bargaining sessions last month, spent
most of Wednesday's session reviewing
AFSCME's requests, which deal only
with non-economic issues such as
grievance procedures, according to
John Forsyth, leader of the ad-
ministration bargaining team.
FORSYTH SAID the union defines
these concerns as "things that don't put
money into their pockets." The two

bargaining teams will finish
negotiations on these topics before
dealing with specific economic deman-.
ds, such as wage increases.
Officials for the union which
represents over 2,100 campus service
personnel, refused to discuss the
negotiations with the Daily.
The University has not made any
counter offers to the union yet, Forsyth
said, because they are still in the
process of analyzing the union
proposals. "We have a basic under-
standing" of AFSCME's requests, ,he
said.

Forsyth added that the negotiations
have gone smoothly so far, and the
University does not expect any dif-
ficulties in -the future. "There is no
reason to believe there will be no new
.contract before the present one runs
out," Forsyth said. He noted, however,
that after only two bargaining sessions,
this can only be a speculative outlook.
The present contract between AF-
SCME and the University expires Mar-
ch 20, two years after the union staged a
26-day walkout following a breakdown
in the 1977 negotiations. The strike
disrupted dormitory food and cleaning
services, and some hospital services.

f'

Uk.!

Faculty to discuss
salary disclosures

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v
(Continued from Page 1)
public disclosure. "If a professor writes
a book which is a bestseller, and makes
a million dollars, which is not unheard
of, that is his own business.''
Hinerman pointed out in answer that
"it's because the professor works at the
University that he can write books that
are attractive to sell.
What are you going to exempt when
outside incomes are directly related to
a professor's position at the Univer-
sity?"
Hinerman also explained that for
many years, doctors working for the
University were paid only a token
salary, and permitted to maintain
private practices. This would raise fur-
ther questions as to what part of a
facultydmember's salary should be
revealed, he said.
TONSOR SAID there are inequitiesin
the salaries paid to members of dif-
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ferent departments. Tonsor said, "The
thing that strikes me is that there is a
disparity between where the University
is putting the money and where it is get-
ting the results. The science depar-
tments at this University are not even
rated (in a recent report of the
Chronicle of Higher Education) and yet
some of the highest salaries in the
Literary College are in those depar-
tments."
Hinerman voiced support for the
current practice of putting a monetary
value on the contributions of faculty
members within a department. "If you
start to judge quality of work and give
people raises on the basis of merit, then
there are going to be differences, and
that's the reward," said Hinerman.
A German professor who wished not
to be identified, said he believes that
members of the science departments
are too highly 'paid. He said, "It's a
myth that scientists have pulled over
the eyes of the people in the humanities
that they're employable on the outside,
and that therefore they deserve a
larger cut of the pie. They're not em-
ployable on the outside, by and large."
The German professor said there are
"definite" disparities between salaries
paid to faculty members of different
departments. "The situation (in the,
German department) has been
somewhat alleviated because of
pressure brought to bear on the (LSA)
dean - it worked."
Thad dean, Billy Frye, said, "I think
I've got some underpaid departments,
and I do what I can to improve them.
We haven't had the financial capacity
to totally eliminate the problem."
Frye said he does not object to
disclosure (in lists without names) in
principal, but added, "I would be con-
cerned that the faculty would draw
wrong conclusions."
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HILLSBOROUGH, Calif. (AP) -
Saying sh'e is stronger, more confident
and still proud to be Patricia Hearst,
the young heiress-turned-bank robber
bounced out of federal prison yesterday
to a joyful homecoming and the start of
a new life.
"There .it is-the commutation!" she
said, grinning outside the prison and
waving the gold-sealed document
signed Monday by President Carter to
cut short her seven-year bank robbery
sentence.
She is a free woman for the first time
in five years, after being a kidnap vic-
tim, an armed bank robber, a fugitive,
and finally a prisoner.
IN HER FIRST moment of freedom,
she rushed to her fiance, Bernard
Shaw, and gave him a quick kiss on the
cheek as he stood near the gate of the
Federal Correctional Institution at
Pleasanton.
As the sun rose, she told about 150
reporters that she planned to take a
vacation and perhaps do some writing.
Then she hopped into a station wagon
with Shaw, her attorney and two
bodyggards for the hour-long drive to
her mother's home in Hillsborough; a
posh San Francisco suburb.
Thee she was met by a large group of
friends and family members who burst
into loud applause as the car pulled into
the 'driveway. Her German shepherd,
Arrow, whimpered.
SHE DOFFED the blue parka she
had worn to ward off the morning frost
and showed off a green T-shirt which
said: "PARDON ME."
She also wore a medallion with green
rhinestones spelling out "'SURVIVOR"
and 2-4-74, the date of her kidnapping by
members of the self-styled terrorist
Symbionese Liberation Army.
The necklace was a gift from her

fiance, and she said she would add to
the jewelry the date of her release from
prison.
"I DIDN'T WEAR -a bulletproof vest
but I dressed for the occasion," she
joked. There had been reports that
Shaw, a San Francisco policeman and
her former bodyguard, would ask her to
don a vest before leaving the prison.
Later she told television crews and
photographers allowed in a living room
of the house that she felt the trials of the
past five years had matured her.
"I think I've gotten a lot stronger, a
lot more*self-confident. I take a lot of
things in stride that make other people
fall apart," she said.
SHE SAID SHE plannd to take a
vacation, but grinned and refused to
say when or where.
"Where can you go on vacation where
you wouldn't be known at Patricia
Hearts?" one reporter asked.
"I don't see anything wrong with
being Patricia Hearst," she replied, as
friends applauded.
Among those at her homecoming
brunch were Janey Jimenez, the for-
mer marshal who guarded Hearst
during her trial and eventually became
her close friend, and the Rev. Edward
Dumke, who headed the committee that
worked for her early release from
prison.
THE MICIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No. 10:1
Friday. February 2. 1979
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

AP Photo
A jubilant Patty Hearst posed for photographers last week. She was released
yesterday after a 23 month prison stay.
H-earst celebrates
first day of freedom4.Y

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