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January 21, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Fr= YCU SEE NE L MA)PEN C Z-g
MSA cleans up
Because Michigan Student Assembly (MSA) members apparently
have been neglecting their housekeeping duties, the fire department
nearly closed the doors on their Michigan Union offices. A fire inspector
visiting the premises last December was reportedly miffed about the
somewhat disheveled conditions of the place. The inspector gave
Assembly. members until this week to clean up, or the offices would be
shut- down. They cleaned up. The December visit was prompted by a
break-in into the offices. Vandals, apparently with keys, entered the
offices and set the mimeograph machine on fire, according to the MSA
vice-president Kate Rubin. Rubin said the vandals were putting -ages
of the Bible through the mimeograph machine, then lighting the pages
on fire. Yesterday, Assembly member Jeff Supowit remarked, "It's
been a lot cleaner around here lately." Supowit also said that Rubin is
the biggest offender when it comes to messy desks.
Shakey 's tape
The Daily's citywide search for Shakey Jake and his cassett
recording, "The Greatest Hits of'Shakey Jake" ended yesterday when
the tape was delivered to the Daily office by none other than Shakey
Jake himself. "There's more on this tape than songs and jokes and
stories," he claimed: "It will teach you young people how to deal with
life." The recording, which Jake personally autographed, will soon be
reviewed by the Daily Arts staff.
'U geography chairman named
Rackham associate dean
Professor Donald Deskins Jr., chairman of the university
geography department, has been named associate dean of the
Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Alfred Sussman, Univerity
Graduate School dean, said, "Professor Deskins' administrative ex-
perience, as well as other aspects of his academic career, equip him
admirably for the position of associate dean." Sussman added that
Deskins' respponsibility will be for financial aid, counseling and any
questions relating to the welfare of all graduate students. Deskins has
served as geography department chairman since 1975. In addition to
that post, he has served as head of the Afro-American Geography
Project, a national group designed to upgrade the quality of
geography instruction at predominantly black colleges.
f ~ "
Prof. cited for hydrocarbon
phase leadership
Donald Katz, university professor emeritus of chemical
engineering, will receive the 1979 Anthony Lucas Gold Medal Award
from the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum
Engineers at the AIME annual banquet on February 21 in New
Orleans. Katz is being recognized for "his distinguished contributions
to hydrocarbon phase behavior leadership as an engineering
educator," according to the award citation. He joined the university
faculty in chemical engineering in 1936 and served as chairman from
1951-62. Katz received three degrees from the university including a
Ph. D and retired from the A. H. White University Professorship in
1977.
0 .
Taey en
On January 21, 1969, Ann Arbor police confirmed rumors that of-
ficers had warned the University Activities Center (UAC) president
that police action could result from the performance of the play
"Dionysus in '69." The UAC president was warned that officers in his
organization could be held legally responsible if prosecution on ob-
scenity or indecent exposure resulted from the performance.
Happenings
FILMS
Cinema II - The Virgin and the Gypsy; Aud. A, Angell, 7, 9 p.m.
Cinema Guild - Little Big Man Aud. 7, Old Arch., 7,9:45 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Dance - Israeli Dancing Group performance: Hillel, 1429 Hill St.,
12-1 p.m.
Faculty Chamber Music Recital - Museum of Art, 2 p.m.
Women's Gymnastics - Michigan v. Michigan State: Crisler Arena,
2 p.m.
,Men's Gymnastics - Michigan v. Michigan State: Crisler Arena, 2
p.m.
Musical Society - Philidor Trio: Rackham Aud., 2:30 p.m.

MISCELLANEOUS
Dance - Israeli dancing: Hillel, 1-3 p.m.
Wesley Foundation - Worship, includes Afro-American music by
Gail Barnes, readings from Paul Lawrence Dunbar, community
singing: Wesleyan Lounge, 602 E. Huron, 5 p.m.
Meeting - Gay discussions: Feminist Federal Credit Union, 500 E.
William, 6 p.m.
Meeting - Community Switchboard mass meeting; 608 N. Main St.,
7 p.m.
MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 1979
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op (Lubitsch night) Die Puppe, 9:30 p.m., Anna
Boleyn, 10:20 p.m., Aud., A, Angell.
MISCELLANEOUS
Alpha Phi Omega - Red Cross student blood drive: Bursley, 3-9
p.m.
Coffee House - "Israel Now," Ruth Navon, Israeli singer and
recording star, Middle eastern food and photo exhibit: Pendleton
Room, Union, 8-10 p.m.
Pardon me, Ray
The biggest hit in Nashville country music these days is a satirical
commentary on former Tennessee governor Ray Blanton's propensity
for pardoning criminals. Brian Christie, a Nashville television
weather reporter, recorded "Pardon Me, Ray" because he was
disturbed that Blanton had pardoned three convicts and commuted the
sentences of 49 others, including a double murderer. Christie wrote
some of the lyrics and compiled the rest from suggestions by at least
100 others including newsroom workers at his television station and by
the musicians who had written the song's music. The most requested
record in Tennessee begins, "Pardon me, Ray, are you the cat that
signs the pardons? Cause you're an old friend of mine, just put your
name on the line. Double murder and rape,that's all the jury put me in
for. And I'm sure you'll agree, they took advantage of me."
F

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, January 21, 1979-Page 3

U.S. STATE DEPAR TMENT:

Women officials denied power

WASHINGTON (AP) - Women
appointed by President Carter to high-
ranking posts at the State Department
are finding it take more than a desk and
a title to crack the "old boy's club" and
influence foreign policy.
Carter, whose relations with women's
groups seemed to be getting worse
recently, appointed more women to top
foreign policy jobs than any other
president when he took office in 1977.
BUT ONE APPOINTEE, Patsy
Mink, has quit in frustration, partly
because she was given too little respon-
sibility. Another, Lucy Wilson Benson,
stays on even though she has been
bypassed frequently in the policy-
making process.
The same bypassing has been ex-
perienced by.Patricia Derian, assistant
secretary of state for human
rights-one of the Carter ad-
ministration's early priority policies.
On the other hand, Mathea Falco, one
of the few female Carter appointees
with an expert's credentials before she
came to the State Department, says she

has been accepted by her male
colleagues.
SOME CASE HISTORIES illustrate
the way women have fared.
Ms. Mink became assistant secretary
of state for oceans, environmental and
scientific affairs after 12 years in
Congress and a losing campaign for the
Senate in 1976.
But the State Department assigned
responsibility for the ."law of the sea"
negotiations on a treaty governing in-
ternational exploitation of ocean
mineral resources to Elliot Richardson,
who was given the title of special am-
bassador.
RESPONSIBILITY FOR the ad-
ministration's nuclear non-
proliferation policy went to Joseph Nye,
who as deputy undersecretary was
nominally Ms. Benson's subordinate.
Six months ago, Ms. Mink quit to
become president of Americans for
Democratic Action. "I felt I could do
more outside the State Department,"
she said last week. Foreign policy, she
found, "was considsered the private

domain of those who came up from the
ranks and those with expert's creden-
tials from other areas, like academia."
Almost all of them are men.
Unitil recently, there were few
women in the elite career service. But
in the past few years, about one-fourth
of the department's new foreign service
officers have been women.
MS. BENSON IS undersecretary of.
state for security assistance, science
and techology. She came to her job
withoutformal experience in those
highly technical areas after she served
as national president of the League of
Women Voters.
Knowledgeable department sources,
who asked not to be named, say Ms.
Benson has never overcome her initial
lack of experience. Reponsibility for
negotiating arms limitation agreemen-
ts has been given to others, all males.
Nye was given control of nucear non-
proliferation policy until he left in
December to resume his teaching post
at Harvard University rather than risk
losing his tenure.
BUT INSTEAD OF responsibility for
non-proliferation policy being left in
Ms. Benson's office, it was transferred

to the aegis of Thomas Pickering.
Ironically, he is Ms. Mink's
replacement. "I find that startling,"
Ms. Fink said. Ms. Benson refused
comment.
Ms. Falco is assistant secretary in
charge of coordinatiang anti-narcotics
efforts. Previously, she was special
assistant to the president of the U.S.
Drug Abuse Council and recognized as
an expert in narcotics control.
"This is truly a male institution, but
my experience has been that once you
demonstrate, competence, acceptance
follows," Ms. Falco said. "I think
women who come into jobs without ex-
perience just because they are women
are done a disservice. They're playing
against a stacked deck."

I -*

THE YOGA CENTER
OF ANN ARBOR
201 East Ann
Ann Arbor, fi 48104

Battle continues over
U.S. abortion policy

8 Week Session Staris Jan. 29-$30
YOGA CLASSES:
Monday-Wednesday-6-8 p.m.
Saturday-10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Call 769-4321

Io

Arthur Penn's

1971

WASHINGTON (AP)-Six years
after the Supreme Court legalized abor-
tion, opponents of the procedure are
preparing for what has become an an-
nual ritual: the commemoration of the
court decision by thousands of demon-
strators.
But the target of tomorrow's demon-
stration, sponsored by a group known
as March for Life, extends beyond the
court. Demonstrators are aiming at in-
fluencing the votes on abortion that will
be taken in Congress during the next
year.
AND THOSE VOTES in turn will be
used as ammunition in the 1980 elec-
tions, when abortion opponents hope to
elect senators and congressmen more
agreeable to their cause.
Supporters of the court's 1973 lan-
dmark decision have no plans for a
counterdemonstration tomorrow, but
say they will make some announcemen-
ts of their own.
The National Abortion Rights Action
League, for example, plans to release
information on a fund formed to pay for'
abortions for poor women who cannot
afford them.
The league estimates that the num-
ber of federally funded abortions has
dropped 98 per cent since Congress
placed strict. curbs on the use of
Medicaid money for abortions.
The public funding issue will be
revived. again this year as Congress
prepares the fiscal 1980 budget. Sean
Downey, legislative director of the
National Right to Life Committee, said
his group and its allies will be lobbying
for even stricter prohibitions onbuseof
government money for abortions.
But the group's primary objective is
passage of a constitutional amendment
banning abortion.
Groups that defend abortion rights
have been able in the past to kill such
amendments by keeping them bottled
up in subcommittees.
But Downey said abortion opponents
will mount a lobbyng effort aimed at
moving the amendment to the House
Judiciary Committee by February 1980,
with a vote by the full committee before
the 1980 congressional elections.
Downey acknowledged that proposals
for comparable action in the Senate

Judiciary Committee are almost non-
existent now that Sen. Edward Ken-
nedy (D-Mass.) has become its chair-
man.
Right-to-life forces already have an-
nounced a "hit list" of senators who will
be targeted for defeat in the 1980 elec-
tions, including Senators Frank Churck
(D-Idaho); Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.);
George McGovern, (D-S.D.); Birch
Bayh (D-Ind.); and Bob Packwood (R-
Ore.).
Daily Official Bulletin
SUNDAY,.JANUARY 21. 1979
SUMMER PLACEMENT
:3200 SA13-763-4117
Camp Becket/Chimney Corners. YWCA/Coed,
Mass. Will interview here Mon. Jan. 29 from 9 to 3:30.
All positions open at this time -waterfront rWSJ )
ridiog. arts/crafts, many others. Register in person
or b phone.
Camp Hickory Ridge, Coed/Handicapped, Mich.
Will interview here 'rues. Jan . :30) from 9 to 5.
Openings include waterfront WSJ arts/crafts:
nurse, unit counselors. Register in person of by
phone.
Camp Tamarack, Mi. Coed. Will interview here
Wed. Jan .:1tfrom 9 to 5. All position
open -waterfront ( WSJ1,arts/crafts, sports, nature.
gen. counselor's and many others. Register by phone
or in person.
OtNAtV. JANUARY 22. t979
Daily Calendar:
Physics/Astronomy: C. Quigg, Fermilab, "About
the Fifth Quark,"2038 Randall Lab., 4p.m.

LITTLE BIG MAN
The rope of the American Indian (or the real "human beings") told in flash-
back form by Jack Crabbe (DUSTIN HOFFMAN). A 121 year-old man who
was there at Little Big Horn. Custer is played as the psychotic politico he
really was, Hoffman is convincingly aged one hundred years during the
course of the film. Gave the western a new look and a modern conscience.
With CHIEF DAN GEORGE, MARTIN BALSAM & FAYE DUNAWAY (as a
minister's wife turned wanton Madam).

Mon: MR. HULUT'S HOLIDAY
(free at 7:00 & 9:05) not on schedule

0

Cinema Guild

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:45

OLD ARCH AUD
$1.50

Christopher Miles

1970

The Virgin & The Gypsy
An intensely romantic filii'that faithfully captures the tone of [ H.~lawrerice's
seminal navel. A rector's indeoendent-minded dauahter fantasizes of sexual
union with a gypsy she met and thereby nurtures a spirit of rebellion. The
gypsy exists simply for her, as a presence, emanicapting her trom sup-
pressed passion and inarticulate lonqinqs. Franca Nero embodies male
sensuality. Though a somewhat "cuieter" film, director Miles' VIRGIN is as
lush and involving as Ken Russell s WOMEN IN LOVE-Lawrence adaptation.
With JOANNA SHIMKUS and HONOR BLACKMAN (96m)

.,l

Wed-Part 2 of the APU
TRILOGY APARAJITO

TONITE
at7&9

Angell Hall Aud "A"
$1.50

ANGELCA
JKCQUELINE

POZO
ELLENS

two woman show
january 9 -26
reception: Tues.-Fri. 10-0
Jan 1 7-pmSat, un. 12-5
FIRST FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION

T6;KE T HE LEfiD
Help New Students Discover
the Diversity of Michigan
BE3E A FELL
ORI ENTEITION
LE#lDER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office (2530 SAB) from
Mon. Jan. 22, to,-Friday Feb. 16, 1979
* an affirmative action non-discriminatory employer *

IT'S COMING!
A SUPER SPECTACULAR EVENT
MICHIGRAS 179
Sat., Feb. 10-8 pm-The Union
To find out more call UAC: 763-1107
MANN THEATRES ADMISSION
F°GETwINo
' ULAGTI Adult $4.00
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTERA
769-1300 Child $2.00

WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT"
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FOR PRICEOFONE!

ommmomomm"

ADLTS FRI.,SAT.,
EVE. A HOLIDAYS
MON.-THURS. EVt.
ALL MATINEES
CHILD TO 14

SUN.
$3.50
$2.50
S 1.50j

I

WAYSIDE THEATRE WALT DISNEY'S
3020 Washtenaw "PIN0CCHIO"
Phone 434-1782

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