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January 19, 1979 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-19

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Page 12-Friday, January 19, 1979-The Michigan Daily

2

locals

meet for
Mack 's'
removal

By MARY FARANSKI
A group of seven local environ-
mentalists went to Lansing yesterday
to speak with Senate Majority Leader
William Faust (D-Westland) about his
attempts to replace Senator Joseph
Mack (D-Ironwood) with a new chair-
man on the Senate Conservation Com-
mittee.
Representatives from PIRGIM's
(Public Interest Research Group in
Michigan) Environmental Task Force,
the University's Natural Resource
Club, the Ecology Center of Ann Arbor,
and Greenpeace of Ann Arbor offered
support for Mack's replacement,
stating that Mack has consistently
blocked the passage of environmental
legislation.
FAUST, SPORTING a maize and
blue "Michigan" sweatshirt, told the
group gathered in his office: "Having
an avowed anti-environmentalist

heading an environmental committee
makes our government look stupid."
He said Wednesday that Senator John
.Hertel (D-Harper Woods) of the Energy
Committee should take over Mack's
post. He also suggested that the Con-
servation and Energy Committees
merge and be renamed the Natural
Resources and Energy Committee or
the Environmental Affairs Committee.
The final vote of Faust's recommen-
dation will be taken on January 30.
SEN. MACK HAS recently had an
operation but is expected to be in
"fighting form" to keep his post, accor-
ding to Faust. Mack refuses to accept
another assignment, but there has been
discussion about awarding him the
chairmanship of the newly-created
Senate Mental Health Committee.
Mack's key weapon is seen as his
accusations that the United Auto
Workers is the main force behind the

push for his renewal.
Ann Arbor Senator Ed Pierce, who
arranged yesterday's meeting between
Faust and the environmentalists, en-
couraged the Ann Arborites to "write
letters to the editors of the Detroit Free
Press and the Ann Arbor News to show
people that this is not a single interest
group's doing. Most of the calls I've got-
ten on the issue are environmental
people, not the UAW."
Sen. Faust said the Conservation and
Energy Committees' top three issues
are preserving Michigan wetlands,
land use, and creation of a Department
of Energy.
Mack has not acted on these issues
during his three years as chairman of
the Conservation Committee. Obser-
vers say this reflects his home district's
views and not those of the majority of
the state. Faust is confident that the
Senate will vote to replace Mack.

By KEVIN ROSEBOROUGH
The ten judges of the U.S. District
Court's eastern district have recom-
mended a reorganization in their bench
assignments that would create a one-
judge federal court in Ann Arbor.
In a proposal sent to Washington for
Congressional approval, the judges
favor the opening of a federal court in
Ann Arbor and another in Port Huron to
more effectively serve these areas.
"WE CONDUCTED a study of cases
over the last three years to determine
whether a court in Ann Arbor would
have a full docket if opened," said the
court's Eastern District office manager
Bill Harper. "We found that it would
and sent along our proposal to
Washington.,
Harper said that the location of the
residences of the surveyed defendants
and attorneys was a factor in the study,
as well as speculation as to where a
case might have been filed. if another

court had been open.
"Ann Arbor has been authorized for
years to have a District Court," said
Harper. "It's just a matter of justifying
it to the public. We don't want to' have
someone up there with nothing to do."
CURRENTLY, lawyers and their
clients from Ann Arbor with legal
business involving the U.S. District
Court must drive to the Federal
Building in Detroit. In addition to being
inconvenient, it also boosts legal costs
for the lawyers' clients, Harper said.
Should the plan be approved by
Congress and by the U.S. Sixth Circuit
Court of Appeals, the courtroom would
be added to Ann Arbor's new federal
building located downtown. The costs of
the new courtroom would be covered by
money budgeted by Congress. District
Judge John Feikens is reportedly in line
for the Ann Arbor judgeship. No date
has been set for the Congressional
ruling.

Judges suggest new
federal court forA 2

.:t . ............ ..........., ...... ...... .....................

NOT SUNDAY,
NOT MONDAY,
NOT TUESDAY
NOT WEDNESDAY,
NOT THURSDAY,
NOT FRIDAY,

GEO-'U' hearings near
conclusion; final rebuttals
given by 'U' attorney

By RONALD GIFFORD
The nine-month-long hearings on the
case between the Graduate Employee
Organization (GEO) and the University
came to near-conclusion yesterday as
University counsel called all but one of
their rebuttal witnesses to testify.
1Attorney Robert Vercruysse called to
the stand Dr. Judith Reitman of the
Psychology Department and Dr.
Richard Sands, chairman of the
Physics Department. Dr. Harold
Jacobsen of the political science depar-
tment testified on Wednesday, as did
James Wessel of the Institute of Social
Research ( ISR) .
THE UNIVERSITY had one other
rebuttal witness, Charles Allmand,
assistant to the President for Academic
Affairs, but there was not enough time
in yesterday's session to call him to the
stand. He will be questioned at the next
day of hearings on February 15 in
Detroit.
The University's rebuttal to the GEO
case was intended to show, through the
testimony of faculty members who
work with Graduate student assistants
(GSA) that the role of GSAs is one of
student and not employee.
GEO and its lawyer Mark Couzens
contend that the GSA's are employees
of the University, therefore entitled to
full bargaining rights under the
Michigan Public Employment
Relations Act.
IN THE Wednesday morning session,
Wessel, assistant director of ISR,
testified that in order for a GSA to get a
research assistantship, a senior
researcher of ISR must appoint the
GSA to the position and certify that the
GSA's work will be academically
relevant to his studies.
Wessel, who began his testimony on
Tuesday afternoon, stated that many of
the research assistants do projects for
ISR, and in turn use the data from those
projects in their doctoral dissertations.
It was not unusual for a senior
researcher, many of whom hold joint
faculty appointments in University
departments, to support a GSA's Ph.D.
research by appointing the GSA to work
on one of the researcher's projects,
Wessel said. He added that ISR policy
allowed payment to those GSA's only if
their appointments had academic
relevance.
He also said ISR benefitted from the
GSA's working there, for many of them

are brought up into the senior resear-
cher ranks upon completion of the
degree to keep ISR adequately staffed.
JACOBSEN SPENT most of his time
on the stand describing the role of the
teaching assistant (TA) in relation to
not only the University but also to the
GSA himself. He pointed out that a
teaching assistantship is a training
ground for the Ph.D. students, where
they could gain practical teaching ex-
perience.
Yesterday, the University lawyer
again pursued his basic line of rebuttal.
Reitman testified that the purpose of
appointing Graduate Student Research
Assistants (GSRA's) was "to teach the
students good research skills and to
provide support" for their graduate
studies. She said that through this, the
student could "get a green thumb in the
laboratory."
The psychology department also has
a teaching requirement for successful
completion of its graduate program,
Reitman said. Since most of the
graduates are placed as teachers,
"they need to know how to teach," she
said.
REITMAN CALLED the process a
learning experience for the student.
"The graduate student in the program
is doing what he must do to graduate.
As the professor involved, I am
teaching them how to do research and
how to teach. I don't see it (the relation-
ship between professor and student) as
them doing services for me.
Sands testified during yesterday af-
ternoon's session on the, benefits
graduate students get from teaching
labs in the physics department. "If you
ask anyone who teaches, he will tell you
that he learns a subject better when he
teaches it. You are forced to organize
your thoughts on the subject," he said.
"The TAhis first, learning physics as
they teach, then learning valuable
laboratory techniques," he continued.
"He also learns the skills of
organization and teaching."
HE ACKNOWLEDGED, though, that
the use of TA's is not always in the best
interest of the University. "The use of a
TAin a lab in the place of the professor
represents a decrease in the level of
education of the undergraduate," San-
ds testified.
Following the completion of the
rebuttal hearings next month, the of-
ficial court transcript of the
proceedings will be typed and
delivered. After this task is finished,
which could take as long as two months,
the attorneys for both sides will compile
their briefs.
Judge Shlomo Sperka, the presiding
administrative law judge, will then
review the briefs and present his
decision to the Michigan Employment
Relations Commission. The com-
mission will issue the final ruling in the
case.

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