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January 19, 1979 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-19

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 19, 1979-Page 11

BODNAR AIDS CA USE

Blue still alive -Har

7

I

By GARY KICINSKI
Special to The Daily
EVANSTON - Alan Hardy's 15-foot
jump shot from near the top of the key
as the buzzer sounded, gave the
Michigan Wolverines a pulsaing 53-51
victory over the Northwestern Wild-
cats, snapping Michigan's three-game
losing streak in a thrilling fashion.
It was a victory with a capital "V" for
the Wolverines, who have fallen on hard
times in the Big Ten this season and had
to struggle to play the Wildcats on
even terms.
THE NECK and neck contest saw the
lead change hands eight times in the
final nine minutes as both teams made
crucial baskets as well as fatal
mistakes in the closing moments.
It was reserye center Paul Heuer-

man, given the starting nod at center,
who sank clutch free throws and batted
away a Wildcat pass who boosted.the
Blue cagers.
With two minutes on the clock and the
score knotted at 49 apiece, Heuerman
hit the first of two tosses to give
Michigan a 50-49 advantage.
THE WILDCATS patiently worked
for a shot, and with 1:11 left forward
Larry Lumpkins put up a baseline jum-
per which Heuerman rebounded and
was then fouled by NU's Bob Klaas.
Again, the 6-8 center connected on the
first of his two tosses to give the
Wolverines a 51-49 lead.
But the inspired Wildcats scored on a
clutch jump shot by guard Brian Gibson
with :39 left to tie it up.
MICHIGAN took the ball upcourt and
called time out with 29 seconds left, and

then passed the ball around until
working it to Hardy as time was run-
ning out.
"We tried to get it to (Marty) Bodnar
for the last .shot but he drew a man off
Hardy shot it. We needed a victory
bad," said Michigan Coach Johnny Orr.
It was Bodnar who had kept the
Wolverines in the game, popping his
guns over the Wildcat zone to lead all
scorers with 18 points.
MICHIGAN'S master plan of moving
senior Phil Hubbard to forward and
starting Heuerman against the taller
Wildcats was about as successful as
anything Michigan has tried of late, but
Heuerman's clutch performance
proved the move to be ironic yet wor-
thwhile.
Both squads opened the contest in
aggressive zone defenses - Michigan

in a 2-3 and Northwestern in a 2-1-2.
Bodnar shot Michigan into the lead with
four swishes from long range in the first
seven minutes.
Northwestern closed the gap though
when Hubbard went out with two quick
fouls, and the Wildcats proceeded to
work the ball inside, With the score
even at 24-24 and 30 seconds to play,
Northwestern went into a stall and
Michigan was given a warning by the
officials to come out on the Wildcats.
With 12 seconds left, Michigan was
assessed a technical foul for not
creating play, even though guard Mark
Lozier looked to be all over his man.
WILDCAT GUARD Jerry Marifke
sank the free throw and the Wildcats
led at halftime 25-24. The Wildcats shot
just 35 per cent from the 'field, but
outrebounded Michigan 23-12, with for-
ward Mike Campbell claiming nine.
"They killed us on the boards," Orr
said. "Murdered us. We've been ahead
at halftime and have been faltering.
Today we were behind and-we won. We
didn't falter down the stretch."
The Wolverines came out of the zone
and moved Hubbard back to the middle
of the man-to-man second half defense.
But Hubbard again experienced foul
trouble and was disqualified with 4:52
remaining. Hubbard and conference
SBig 10 Standings1

scoring leader Mike McGee tallied just
six points apiece.
"One of our goals was to make Hub-
bard play defense and fouled him out of
the game," said NU Coarh Rich Falk.

"And we also wanted to shut McGee
down. We did both of those things, but
Michigan executed well enough to win
anyway.

s' ats, 53-51

Blue squeeze
NORTHWESTERN

MICHIGAN
Min. FG/A FT/A R A PF Pts.

Lumpkins .....
Campbell.
Jung ........
Roberson ......
Gibson ........
Marifke .......
Kass.......
Boesen...
Team Rebounds
Totals .........

Min. FG/A FT/A
38 2/12 3/5
35 8/14 0/0
21 1/7 0/0
30 2/9 0/1
20 3/3 0/0
30 2/6 2/2
14 6/10 2/2
12 0/1 0/0

R
7
14
2
3
3
1
5
4
7

A
4
2
2
i
5
0
0

PF
2
I
3
:1
3

p

ts.

7 Hubbard ......
12 Mcgee.........
2 Hleuerman ..
4 Bodnar .....
6 Smith.......
6 Hardy........
14 Staton........
0 CGarris .......
Lozier.......
51 Mk. Bodnar ...
Teim Rebounds

28 2/6 2/3 7 1
24 3/14 0/0 1 0
26 2/4 2/4 3 0
37 9/11 0/0 2 3
37 2/5 1/4 2 8
24 3/6 0/1 4 1
16 2/2 0/0 0 3
2 1/1 0/0 1S0
3 0/0 0/0 0 0
3 0/1 0/0 0 0

5
2
3
3
1
0
I
0
0
1

s
:$
is
6
4
2
sa
0
0
53

200 22/62 7/10 46 15 15

Halftime: Northestern 25. MICHIGAN 24
Att.-2,392

Totals ......... 200 24/50 5/12 28 16 16

HANLEY BEATS CENTRAL, WESTERN

Tumblers limp to victory

By ALAN FANGER
,Jf the Michigan gymnasts have it
their way, nobody will stop them from
flinging their bruised and battered
bodies to victory after victory.
The Wolverines, who presently sport
both ap undefeated record and a
lengthy injury list, thrashed Central
and Western Michigan in their first
home meet of the season at Crisler
Arena. The Blue tumblers led the way
with 125.00 points, Central was second
at 116.60, and Western third at 96.70.
As in past meets, the Wolverines
were paced by three solid all-around
competitors-juniors Sara Flom and
Mia Axon, and freshman Teresa Berton-
cin. Flom captured the individual title,
highlighting her efforts with first-place
performances on both the vaulting
(8.45) and uneven parallel bars (8.65).
Bertoncin earned second in the all-
around, while Axon notched the fifth
spot.

The gymnasts dented the scorecard
with first, second, and third place
showings in every event but vaulting.
This statistic was a heartwarmer for
Coach Scott Ponto, who has been con-
cerned with the squad's slump on both
the beam and bars.
"The beam and bars were better
tonight," said Ponto. "Mia and Cindy
(Shearon) looked particularly im-
pressive.,And Sara looked great on the
floor exercises and the bars."
Axon cited her improvement on the
beam (7.75, first place) as being the
result of a minor technical change. "My
routine was too short before, so I put in
a trick and made it longer. That was
enough to increase my score."
Although the Wolverines tallied their
second highest total of the campaign,
the rash of injuries seemed to have a
subtle effect on their performance.
Colleen Forrestel, who is nursing a
twisted ankle, seemed to favor it

slightly during a sub-par routine on the
bars, while Flom, the victim of knee
operations, appeared to be hampered
by a recurrent knee sprain.
Accompanying the handicaps were
some surprising efforts, however.
Unheralded freshman Sheron copped
third place on the bars with a 7.5, and
scored 7.85 on a high-risk vault.
Another little-known freshman,
Laurie Miesel, received a 7.85 for a fine
floor exercise routine. "I felt really
good during the routine," she said.
"I'm gaining a lot more confidence as
they get better."
The tumblers will have at their best
Sunday when 11th-ranked Michigan
State invades the Crisler confines. "We
have to do better to win on Sunday,"
said Ponto. "And I know we're capable
of scoring better."
"We have a lot of momentum, but
we're still making mistakes," said
Axon. "I think the win will make us
more comfortable for the MSU meet."

MASTER'S AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
DEGREES IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
Financial aid is available for Engineering and Science Majors for graduate
study in NuclearhEngineering, Fusion Engineering, and Health Physics.
Graduate Research and Teaching Assistantship stipends range from $5000
to $8300 per year plus out-of-state tuition waiver. President's Fellowships
for outstanding applicants provides a stipend of $5000 per year plus full
tuition waiver.
For Information write: Director, School of Nuclear Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

Ohio State
Illinois
Iowa
Mich. State
Purdue
MICHIGAN
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Indiana
Northwestern

Conference
W L Pct.
5 0 1.000
4 1 .800
4 1 .800
2 2 .600
2 3 .400.
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
1 4 .200
0 5 .000

Overall

W
10
16
11
10
12
8
8
7
9
4

L
4
1
3
3
5
5
6
7
8
10

Pct.
.714
.941
.786
.769
.706
.615
.571
.500
.529
.286

v

. Bt6L?*

OSU EDGES MINNESOTA

\V 9 y'FNAw

' 9
9
m
ti
-25

MSU Spartans shatter Hoosiers

ru

r

V !

I 1

By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING, Mich. - Michigan
State's Earvin Johnson, the key to the
Spartans' up-and-down fortunes all
season, scored 20 points in the second
half last night as sixth-ranked MSU
stormed from behind to down Indiana
82-56 in Big Ten basketball. ,
Johnson sat out all but six minutes of
the first half after picking up three fouls
early.
He watched from the bench as MSU
blew a six-point lead and Indiana took a

35-31 halftime advantage.
Johnson returned with a frenzy,
scoring repeatedly on driving layups in
the early stages of the second half as
the Spartans reeled off 14 unanswered;
points and seized control of the game
with a 53-41 lead.
* * *
OSU 83, Mnnesota 8()
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Big Ten basket-
ball leader Ohio State blew 13-point first
half leads before rallying behind Jim

Smith to trim Minnesota 83-80 last
night.
The 6-foot-8 Smith, a sophomore for-
ward from Cleveland, scored a career-
high 17 points, most of them coming in
the final moments to lift the Buckeyes'
conference record to 5-0.
Smith, whose previous high was 14
points against Michigan last season,
scored five straight points to send Ohio
State into a 75-70 lead with less than
four minutes remaining.
The 16th-ranked Buckeyes kept the

NO PLANS FOR FUTURE:

Belligerent Hayes feels no regret

lead down the hectic stretch for their
10th victory in 14 starts. Minnesota fell
to 2-3 and 7-7 records.
Kelvin Ransey pumped in 20 points
and Herb Williams added 19 for Ohio
State, which led at halftime 38-34.
Minnesota, led by freshman Mark
Hall's 23 points, reeled off 10 straight
points midway in the second half for a
56-51 lead before the Buckeyes rallied.
* * *
Iowa 56, Purdue 46
WEST LAFAYETTE - Junior guard
Ron Lester scored 22 points as Iowa
capitalized on 23 Purdue turnovers to
post a 56-46 Big Ten basketball victory
last night.
The difference came at the free throw
line, where Iowa hit 18-of-25 as com-
pared to Purdue's 6-of-13.
Freshman Kevin Boyle had 15 points
and intercepted two Purdue passes to
foil comeback efforts by the Boiler-
makers.
The Hawkeyes, 11-3 overall and 4-1 in
the Big Ten, led all the way and took the
lead for good on a Lester field goal that
made the score 4-2.
Illinois 81 Wisconsin 74
MADISON -- With guard Mark Smith
scoring 15 points, fourth-ranked Illinois
survived a career-high 25-point produc-
tion from Wisconsin's Larry Petty last
night and earned an 81-74 Big Ten Con-
ference basketball victory over the
Badgers.
The Illini (16-1) twice built 12-point
leads in the second half. Rob Judson
and Derek Holcomb sandwiched field
goals around a Neil Bresnahan free
throw to halt a Wisconsin comeback
and make it 73-64 with 2:17 left.

ion

ATLANTA (AP)-Woody Hayes,
the former Ohio State University foot-
ball coach, is not apologizing for
striking a Clemson player'in the Gator
Bowl game last month.
"Do you expect me to go on crying
over spilled milk?" Hayes asked during
the first far-ranging interview he has
granted since he was fired for the Dec.
29 incident.
"I HAVE a temper," said Hayes.
"I've had it all my life. I have a lot of
regrets. Who doesn't? We all do."
Hayes, who ruled a Buckeye football
empire for 28 years, said he felt no bit-
terness toward the university for firing
him.
"My sense of loyalty is too deep for
that," he said. "I feel disappointed, but
I'm not going to let that affect my life. I
hope to Christ I'm too big for that."
AMONG OTHER things, he discussed
the parallel between football and war
records, bemoaned an influx of out-of-
state coaches trying to recruit athletes
in Ohio since his dismissal and fretted
over the fate of some of his assistant
coaches not retained by the new Ohio

U.

State coach, Earle Bruce.
He said one should not look at a foot-
ball team's record, but at whether it is
an improving team. He compared that
with the war results of the United States
and the Soviet Union.
Hayes cited the U.S. record as being
8-1-1, with the tie and defeat coming in
the last two-the Korean and Vietnam
wars.
"NOW CHECK the Russians," he
said. "They're 1-4. In their last five
wars, they've won one, but they won-the
last one."
When his attention turned to the
possibility of his assistant coaches
losing their jobs, Hayes said, "Jesus,
that just makes me sick."
He said he intended to go to the
Super Bowl game in Miami this week to
try to land jobs for some of them.
HAYES EXPRESSED admiration
for his favorite military hero, Gen.
George S. Patton, saying he would have
made an outstanding football coach,
and for Judge Kenesaw Mountain
Lanis, the former commissioner of
baseball.

He said Lanis "was a mean old son of
a bitch and honest to the core . . . as
honorable as honorable could be. He
was a mean old guy, but you have to
have people like him running the
show."
"I never trusted a nice guy my whole
life,"he said.
HAYES SAID he has had a temper all
of his life and sometimes he gets angry
at himself for losing it.
Asked if he knew the source of his
temper, Hayes replied: "I'm not gonna
reveal it. I have an idea."
Recognized as a stern disciplinarian,
Hayes said: "You have got to set down
rules and stand by them. But you've got
to have purpose behind all your rules,
other than just being boss."
HE SAID HE had failed to follow that
dictum at times because everyone is
guilty of it.
"We're all guilty of that sort of
thing," he said. "Parents are guilty'of
it, why sure.
"There's a little dictator in all of us,"
Hayes said. "And dictators are the
dumbest people in the world."

21

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2-5 p.m.

5t HOT DOGS

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IN

TUESDAY
Half price on Beer
7-11 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 7-10 p.n
Beer and Liquor

n.

(
.

--- -_ -

310 Maynard
IOURS: 1 pm-2 am, Fri. 11:30 am-2 am,
Sat. 11 am-2 am
WE ARE STILL ADMITTING
18,19 & 20 YEAR OLDS!

-i

Men & Women -of U of M

ESCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
D~etroit 81, EgAst Carolina 69
Notre name 88. San Francisco 69
Michigan St. 82. Indiana 56
Iowa 56, Purdue 46
Ohio State 83, Minnesota 80
Michigan 53, Northwestern U
Illinois 81, Wisconsin 74
Georgetown 75, Fordham 65
NBA
Phoenix 97, Detroit 87
NHL
Boston 4, St. Louis 0

'5OC OFF

Rush Po Lambda Phi
fraternity

-1

I
I

on any
ihe Dinner I
r. 0- r aa

Open House: Jan. 21

-25

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