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December 04, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Sexual harassment discussed

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
When it comes to sexual harassment,
thanks to the feminist movement,
women have some choices both in the
"halls of higher education" and in the
work place, according to women's ad-
ocate Mary Ann Largen.
"The growing willingness to fight
back is new although the problem of
sexual harassment isn't," Largen told a
small group of 22 women and four men
last night at a Viewpoint lecture in the
Michigan Union Pendleton Room.
LARGEN, A two-year expert on the
subject and Coordinator of the National
Task Force of the National
Organization of Women urged women
to "fight back" for their rights.
Largen proposed that sexual
harassment, including everything
from verbal abuse to rape, is a common
experience on the college campus. "Un-
til every woman understands that
harassment does not have to be
tolerated, everything from verbal
abuse to rape will continue to be used as
tools for men wishing to maintain the
male power structure."
Lergen cited the common theory that
women are responsible for their vic-
timization and for remedying it as a
real obstruction to her campaign.
"Even at the federal level, the gover-
nment won't do anything until the
women come forward first. It's a real
problem."
THE FEMINIST also outlined steps
for women to take themselves in case of
harassment. She suggested legal
solutions only as a last resort because
they are such a time-consuming

process and can even aggravate
harassment in the interim.
First, she said, don't feel guilty when
you encounter sexual harassment, it
doesn't usually have anything to do
with what you have said or done." She
urged women to react to the situlation.
"Never ignore it-it won't go away.
Talk to the person privately, trying not
to alienate him. If this doesn't work,
try something sterner, remind him that
what he is doing is against the law."
She cited lack of assertiveness as a
problem women have, in some
situations.
"Size up the situation," she en-
couraged, "usually men who are not up
front about their advances can be
backed down."
IF THE PROBLEM persists, she
urged women to take their problem to a
higher official, and to avoid seeing the
offender in private. "Have a lawyer
write a letter, this will sometimes work
if a superior fails to reprimind the
harasser. "
In the case of professor/student
harassment, Largen recommended
that students file suit against the
University under Title IX of the 1969
Equal Education Act.
According to Largen's own survey
taken by her research group New
Responses, Inc. 48 per cent of those
women tested had experienced sexual
harassment. She told women not to be
afraid or embarrassed. "In a situation
where one person has power; and
especially if that person is male,
harassment often occurs. Women have
got to take this into their own hands,"
she said.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, December 4, 1979-:Page 3
at CANTERBURY LOFT
ANEW MUSICAL PLAY BY TOM SIMONDS
THE WINEDRINKERr
A Celebration of Homosexuality
Against the Brotherhood
December 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14 and 15
8p.m. at CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. State Street-second floor
general admission $2.50 at the door
beginning at 7:30 p.m. on performance nights
THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
IncomeTax Assistance Program
is having a mass meeting for people interested in volunteering
for the program. Volunteers will be trained to fill out 1040-
1040-A & State Tax forms.
" GAIN TAX EXPERIENCE
* MAKE PROFESSIONAL CONTACTS
* EXPLORE CAREERS OPPORTUNITIES
*HELP OTHERS
MASS MEETING WEDNESDAY, DEC. 5
35 ANGELL HALL-7pm
For further info, contact the Project Community Office,
2204 Michigan Union, 763-3548
Office of Student Services & Office of Community Service

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Daily Photo by CYRENA CHANG
MARY ANN LARGEN, co-ordinator of the National Task Force of, the
National Organization of Women, told a small audience that women today
are more willing to fight back against sexual abuse than in the past. Largen
made the remark during a Viewpoint lecture held in the Pendleton room
of the Union last night.

(Prices effective Dec. 4-10)

'U' MALE RETIREES GET MORE THAN FEMALES:
Panel studies pension biases

BY JOHN GOYER
#A new University committee is
examining ways to equalize retirement
payments to male and female faculty
and staff -retirees. The three-member
panel explained the study to more than
100 LSA faculty members yesterday at
the group's monthly meeting.
The committee study comes in the
wake of recent legislation and court
tests which prohibit insurance com-
panies from making smaller payments
to females based on their longer expec-
ted lifespans.
CURRENTLY under three of the 11
pension options offered by the Univer-
sity's insurance contractor, females
are paid less than male retirees of
equal age who have, worked the same
amount of time at the University.
Under one option, a pension plan for
single persons, the female may receive
15 per cent less per month than her
male counterpart.
The University currently pays some
$15 million per year into the retirement
fund, to which the faculty and staff add
another $11 million.
ALTHOUGH THE committee is
likely to be several months in proposing
a solution to the problem, several were

discussed at yesterday's LSA faculty
meeting, including a proposal to add a
lump sum of about $1 million to the pen-
sion fund from the University's general
fund.-
Another solution would be to compute
retirement benefits from data that ex-
clude statistics showing women live
longer than men. Study committee
member Don Thiel, head of the Univer-
sity's office of staff benefits, said that
solution would mean about four per
cent less per month for the male

retirees.
Following the meeting, LSA Dean
Billy Frye called the issue "sensitive,
more than I had expected." Frye said
the issue facing both faculty and
lawmakers would eventually boil down
to a choice of which equality was more
important: Whether men should pay
in and receive as a group the same
amount as women, who are likely to
live longer, or whether women as in-
dividuals should receive the same per
month as men.

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uture relation
(Continued from Page 1)'
on the hostage situation in Iran remains
unchanged and that U.S. officials still
are pursuing peaceful means to free the
50 hostages heldin Tehran. He cited ac-
tion before the United Nations and the
scheduling of a Dec. 10 hearing before
the World Court.
THE ATTACK on the Tripoli em-
bassy followed pro-Iranian demon-

FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-The Memory of Justice, 7 p.m., Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
Cinema II-Sambizanga, 7, 9p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Chamber Winds Ensemble and Saxophone Concert, 8
p.m., School of Music Recital Hall.
Musical Society-Violinist Nina Beilina, 8:30 p.m., Rackham Audiotirum.
SPEAKERS
International Center-K. Allin Luther, "Iranian Revolution", noon, Center
Recreation Room.
Michigan League-Thomas J. Galvin, "Current Issues Facing the
American Library Association," 3:30 p.m., Hussey Room, Michigan League.
College of Engineering-Michael, Neuman, "Electronic Instrumentation
in Obstetrics and Gynecology," 4 p.m., 1042 E. Engineering, L.V. Ahlfors,
Harvard University, Mathematics Colloquium, 4 p.m., 3201 Angell, Sigurd
Ramfjord, "Clinical Research in Periodontics," Robert Owen, "Recent
Discoveries Concerning the Surface Microlayer of the Great Lakes," 7:30
p.m., Chyrsler Center.
Hillel-Rabbi Samuel Joseph, Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, "Jews
and Cults: An Update," 4 p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill Street.
Science Research Club Program-Sigurd P. Ramfjord, L.D.S., Ph.D.,
"Clinical Research in Periodontics," and Hugh Aller, "Expanding the Fron-
tiers of Space with Radio Telescopes," 7:30 p.m., Chrysler Adult Education
Center, North Campus.
MEETINGS
College of Engineering-standing committee meeting, 3 p.m., Deans of-
fice, 255 West Engineering.
SDX/SPJ-Society of Professional Journalists, sign-ups and elections, 5
p.m., Journalism Department Workshop.
MISCELLANEOUS
Museum of Art-Gallery Talk, 3 p.m., Museum of Art.
Hillel-Orthodox Minyan, 4:40 p.m., Shabbat Dinner, 6:15 p.m., 1429 Hill
Street.
UAC-Mini-course: Bartending, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union, tickets
available at Ticket Central.}

Is with Libya
strations by Moslem militants at
American missions in Kuwait, the
Philippines, Great Britain, Thailand
and India. Less than two weeks ago, the
U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan
was attacked and burned.
FourteenAmericans on duty at the
embassy in Tripoli were forced to flee
from the mob. The first floor of the em-
bassy building was burned.
THE LIBYAN government has ex-
pressed "regret" over the incident in.
Tripoli, but it has not offered to take
responsibility for failing to protect the
U.S. mission or offered compensation
for damage.
Spokesman Carter said the United
States had appealed to Libyan
authorities for increased protection of
the embassy,but that the plea was
ignored. He said the Tripoli gover-
nment's attitude was "inadequate and
unresponsive."
He would not specify what steps
might be taken in thie review of U.S.
relations with Libya, beyond saying a
"full range of options" existed.

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