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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 30, 1979 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ANTARTICA DISASTER PROBED:
Piloterror reportedly caused crash

The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 30, 1979-Page 9

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CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (AP) - The pilot
of the Air New Zealand DC-10 that crashed into a
remote Antarctica volcano, killing all 257 persons
aboard, apparently made a navigational error that
took him to the "wrong" side of the wind-lashed
mountain, the head of the recovery operation said
yesterday.
An airline spokesman acknowledged that the pilot,
Capt. Jim Collins, 45, had never flown the Air New
Zealand antarctic sightseeing route before. But
spokesman Jim Berry refused to , comment on a

possible cause for the crash.
AN ADVANCE TEAM of three mountaineers
yesterday reached the crash site, 1,500 feet up the
side of 12,400-foot-high Mount Erebus, reported no
sign of survivors and said they spotted 60 or 70 bodies,
a U.S. Navy spokesman said.
But it was clear that the recovery effort would be
an awesome task: the climbers said a polar blizzard
was already covering the wreckage and bodies with
snow.
The death toll in Wednesday's crash, including 21
Americans, was the fourth-highest in aviation
history. It was the third fatal accident involving a

DC-10 this year, and it aroused new demands that the
McDonnell-Douglas plane be grounded.
THE DIRECTOR of the British Safety Council ad-
vised travelers to shun the DC-10, and two lawmakers
in Britain and West Germany demanded that their
countries ban the plane until after an investigation of
the New Zealand crash. Some air-safety experts con-
tend the DC-10 has dangerous design flaws, a charge
the manufacturer heatedly disputes.
Roy Thomson, New Zealand's chief official for An-
tarctica and leader of the crash-recovery mission,
said it appeared to him that the pilot, not the plane,
was to blame.

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Senate committee proposes Chrysler wage
freeze as condition for government aid

From AP. UPI. and Reuter
WASHINGTON-The Senate Banking
Committee last night tossed out a
proposal, backed by the administration
and Chrysler, to save the failing
automaker and instead passed a har-
sher recovery plan requiring a three-
year wage freeze for both management
and labor.
In one day the committee threw out
the administration's $1.5 billion loan-
guarantee plan and replaced it with a

bill reducing government guarantees to
$1.25 million, directing a three-year
wage freeze and tightening private
financing requirements far beyond
administration desires.
THE VOTES WERE 10-5 to scrap the
administration bill and 10-4 to report
the substitute bill for full Senate action.
Unlike the administration bill, the
Senate measure spells out how much
money should come from each source,
although the board would be authorized

to make adjustments in these amounts.
In compensation for the wage freeze,
employees would receive $250 million in
newly issued voting stock in Chrysler.
Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) said this
would give the employees about 40 per
cent of the stock.
THE FREEZE ALSO would require
reopening the three-year wage contract
signed Tuesday by Chrysler and the
United Auto Workers. UAW President
Douglas Fraser said the contract could

not be reopened unless "the very sur-
vival of the company was at stake."
Backers of the Senate bill said
Chrysler's future is at stake. The cor-
poration, the third largest automobile
maker in the country, has said it expec-
ts to lose $1 billion this year and faces
the threat of bankruptcy if it does not
receive assistance.
"We're not out of the woods yet," said
Democratic Senator Ronald Riegle of
Michigan, Chrysler's leading Senate
ally.
"WE'VE GOT a tough fight ahead in
the Senate and then trying to get a ver-
sion acceptable to the- House and
Senate," before Chysler runs out of
money early next year.

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Pope praises 'virtues' of Islam;
urges cooperation between religions

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) - Pope John
Paul II is holding out the olive branch to
the Moslem world in a most con-
ciliatory pronouncement by a modern
pontiff in praise of the virtues of Islam.
Against the backdrop of Islamic
revival in Iran and other nations, the
pope chose the capital of a major
Moslem country to send out a clear
message yesterday, the Roman
Catholic Church wants to sweep away
centuries of suspicion and mistrust
between the two faiths and move into a
new era of cooperation.
"I WONDER whether it is not urgent,
precisely today when Moslems and
-Christians have entered anew period of

historyto recognize and develop the
spiritual links which unite us to
promote and defend together ... moral
values, peace and liberty," the pope
said in St. Paul's church in Ankara,
capital of this 99-per cent Moslem
nation.
While the Vatican broke new ground
at the 1965 Second Ecumenical Council
by expressing "esteem" for Moslems
who worship a single God, John Paul
went a step further in his first visit to a
Moslem country.
He is proposing a common crusade to
give young people "a direction in life"
and "fill the vacuum left by
materialism" - two themes he has
voiced at the Vatican and during "-s

trip to Ireland and the United States
last month.
WHY SHOULD the two faiths work
together after Christians and Moslems
battered each other through the
crusades in the Middle Ages and during
missionary proselytizing drives?
Quoting both the Koran and the Bible
to prove his point, Pope John Paul
carefully demonstrated that Christians,
Moslems and Jews trace their spiritual
descent from the prophet Abraham.
Moslem veneration of Jesus as a
prophetand honoring of the Virgin
Mary also provide a common ground.
The pope's goodwill gestures toward
Islam have already made an impact
here.

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Roach'es
(Continued from Page 1)
According to an Ann Arbor Tenant's
Union spokesman who asked to be iden-
tified only as Andy, "If it's just one
apartment (with roaches) then lan-
dlords are not responsible," and
usually the larger buildings are the
ones that encounter the problem.
HE ADDED that when students come
to the Tenant's Union with a cockroach
problem, "We tell them to go to their
landlord, and you can break a lease
because of cockroaches - it's called
constructive eviction."
Erica Vener, Mediation Assistant of
landlord-tenant disputes for the
University, said when she gets calls
from harried students, she too advises
them to talk to their landlord first. If he
or she won't cooperate, recourses in-
clude withholding rent until the
problem is corrected, or demanding
monetary'compensation from the lan-

cause local nuisance

I

dlord. She added, however, that she
generally finds landlords receptive
about sending exterminators to apar-
tments with cockroaches.
Several exterminating= services sup-
ply unmarked cars for those afflicted
with the troublesome pests that would

like to keep the problem quiet.
There are four major species of these
troublesome insects, the largest being
the Oriental, which is common in Ann
Arbor. Primarily nocturnal,
cockroaches thrive on warmth and
darkness.
,El

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