100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 30, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Friday, November 30, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Giant T.V.
Screen for
Sporting
Events
Breakfast
Served Anytime
Free Hash Browns
Wth Any Eggs or
Omelettes
Beer,
Cocktails,
and
Extensive
Wine List.

BACCHUS' GARDENS
338 S. State Street
For fast pick-up orders call: 663-4636

REJECTS PROPOSED TEMPORAR Y BAN

See Airthe
Monday Night
Football
Games
ALSO
PITCHER
NIGHT
$1 Off on
Pitcher Beer
Bar Special
Frosted
10 0. Mug

House backs 'A

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a vote both
sides suggested was mainly symbolic,
the House rejected yesterday a
proposed temporary ban on construc-
tion of new nuclear power plants.
By a 254-135 margin, the House tur-
ned back an amendment by Rep. Ed-
ward Markey (D-Mass.), that would
have held up nuclear plant construction
permits by the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission at least until next April 1.
IT WAS THE first showdown in the
House on the nuclear moratorium issue
since the Three Mile Island accident

last March 28, although the House did
reject, by a 235-147 vote on June 18, a
proposal to ban new nuclear plants in
states without emergency evacuation
plans.
Sponsois of the Markey amendment
said it was inspired by the accident at
the nuclear generating plant near
Harrisburg, Pa. Markey called rejec-
tion of his amendment "congressional
failure to recognize clear evidence that
our program is flawed."
The action came as the House worked
on a $427-million bill authorizing

.

plant b
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) programs for the 1980 fiscal
year that began Oct. 1.
Both sponsors and critics of the
proposed moratorium agreed that it
would have little practical effect.
For one thing,,the NRC has a self-
imposed moratorium on' licensing,
which officials have said will last at
least until next spring. And while that
NRC moratorium has actually held up
the opening of four nuclear plants on
which construction has been com-
pleted, the Markey proposal was aimed

uilding
at plants not scheduled to be finished
for years.
Yesterday's House vote was the first'
in either chamber since the presidential
commission that investigated the ac-
cident issued its final report earlier this
month.
That report, by the commission
headed by Dartmouth College
President John Kemeny, accused: the
NRC of being in disarray and recom-
mended its overhaul - but stopped
short of formally recommending a
moratorium on new nuclear plants.

It's MOONLIGHT MADNESS at
Friday, Nov. 30 -6 p.m. to 12 a.m.
6 HOURS ONLY Camera Shop, Inc.
KODACOLOR 11 Color Print Film V.P.D. Photo Albums
20 Exposure 110 or 126...........1.53 30'/ f
24 Exposure 35mm. . .. ..........1.68
(LIMIT-1 rolls per customer) (All other photo albums and
ref ills will be reduced)
Voightlander Vitoret 110
High Quality Pocket CameraC
Reg. 34.95 Now 24.88 GIFT WRAP AND BOWS
R___.__34.95_ _ __ __ __ _WILL BE SOLD AT
Kodak Instamatic X-15F Outfit INCREDIBLY LOW PRICES.
Perfect camera for a beginner There's still time to plaCe your
Reg. 16.95 Now 13.88 order for photo-greeting cards
All Marshand Gadget Bagsby Eastman Kodak or Guardian
Photo.
30% Off MOST ORDERS ACCEPTED THROUGH DEC. 5th
15% Off on any Beseler Darkroom Equipment
with the purchase of an enlarger listed below:
Beseler 23C11 or Beseler 67C,
10 pm. to 12 a.m.
2 HOURS ONLY
MINOLTA r4t~~0 ,
XD CAMERAS
with your choice of
45 mm f/2, 50 mm f/1.7,
or50mmf/1.4
MD Rokkorx Lens
To the best of our Knowledge
the Lowest Price ever offered
TWO HOURS ONLY!
(Sorry we cannot advertise
this unbelievable price) _ On this particular item we
will not be able to accept
WE WILL BE OFFERING BARGAIN PRICES American Express or Diners
ON EVERYTH ING IN OUR STORE. Club cards.
Don't miss this spectacular sale!
6 HOURS ONLY!
COVERS
y W
1115 S. University Camera Shop, Inc.
Since 1939-Ann Arbor's Friendly Camera Shop 665-6101

Religion affects Iranian crisis

(Continued from Page 1)
than Nixon committed. . . The
Ehrlichmanns and John Deans have
been tried and some of them executed.
Now, should the Ayatollah pardon their
Nixon?" Mazrui asked. "Well, they
have decided they don't want to do it
that way."
That basic religious difference on the
question of justice comes from
dissimilarities between Jesus and
Mohammed, Mazrui said. "Jesus died
an underdog (and) was spared from
having to administer a political com-
munity" in his lifetime, Mazrui said. He
added that Mohammed, too, believed in
forgiveness until he was put in charge
of running a nation-state, and given the
responsibility of enforcing the law.
MAZRUI DESCRIBED Iran under
the shah as an Islamic nation that was

on a path of being co-opted into a
westernized nation, something like
modern-day Turkey. He said
Khomeini's Islamic revolt this year
arrested that process of westernization,
and was only continuing a revolution
that had been stalled for 25 years by the
C.I.A., when the U.S. reinstated the
shah in the 1950s.
For a whole generation, virtually 25
years, the U.S. got a reprieve from the
revolution by letting Theodore
Roosevelt's grandson go into the streets
and organize a counter revolution
against (Dr. Mohammed) Mossadegh,
a political opponent of the shah. This is
no left-wing accusation - just read
Monday's New York Times, it's all
there," Mazrui noted.
Now, with the 49 hostages still captive

in the American Embassy in Telran
and the Carter administration moving
for a United Nations resolution of'the
conflict in tomorrow night's schediked
Security Council debate, the Ayatoll'ah
has effectively ruled out any interven-
tion by the international body.
Mazrui said yesterday Iran would
only logically reject any interpretation
of international law, since "inter-
national law is a child of Western
thinking. There was no contribution;to
international law from alternative
civilization, especially not from Islamic
civilization."
Mazrui said he himself has "mixed
feelings" on the embassy takeover, un-
derstanding the position of the militant
students while not necessarily con-
doning their tactics.

Desegregation case-

(Continued from Page 1)
Topeka schools are in compliance with
constitutional standards for racial in-
tegration, he intends to close the case
"so that questions such as we have just
resolved are not presented to another
judge 24 years from now."
The last action relating to Topeka
schools was in 1961, when a lower court
panel concluded Topeka was making a
"good-faith effort" toward
desegregation.
THE TOPEKA school district has an
enrollment of 16,875. School board

'Iii0

enrollment figures as of Sept. 17 show
that 3,993, or 23.66 per cent, are
minorities.
Three elementary schools on
Topeka's east side, where most of the
city's blacks live, have minority
enrollments of 74.3, 62.2, and 62.1 per
cent, the figures show. One junior high
on the east side has 71.4 per cent
minority students. The only high school
in east Topeka has minority enrollment
of 36.8 per cent.
On Topeka's west and south sides,
there are elementary schools with as
little as three per cent minority
enrollment, a junior high with only four
per cent, and a high school of 4.8 per
cent.
JAMES GRAY, school superinten-
dent, said yesterday that the district
has made good progress at improving
racial balance with a long range plan
under which schools are being closed.
"I am confident that they will find
Daily Official Bulletin
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30,1979
Daily Calendar:
WUOM: options, "Federal Grand Jury," 10:00
a.m.
Guild House: Soup and Sandwich luncheon, Bar-
bara Fuller, "U.S. Policy and the Crisis in Indo-
China," 802 Monroe, noon.
Center for S.&SEA Studies: Marion Dresner,
"Gaming and Resource Decision Making," 2032
Dana, noon.
Center for Research on Economic Development:
Alberto Garcia, "Le Futur des Micro-Ordinateurs
das le Pays du Tiers-Mode," CRED Conf., 3rd fl, Old
Arch, 12:10 p.m.
Resource Policy & Mangt. Prog.: Jerry Lax,
"Legal Issues in Resource Policy and
Management," 2024 Dana, 3 p.m.
Philosophy: Derek Parfit, Oxford, "Obligations to
Future Generations," Amphitheatre, Rackham, 4
p.m.
Statistics: Wen-Chen Chen, Carnegie-Mellon-U.,
"Some Limit Theorems for Size Distributions," 451
Mason Hall, 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: N. Morrison, U-Toledo,
"Mass Loss in A-Type Supergiants," 807 Dennison, 4
p.m.
Computing- Center: 20th Year Celebration
Program & Reception, Paton Accounting Center,
Hale Aud., BA Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
Museum of Art: Theodore Reff, Columbia-U.,
"The Reaction Against Impressionism in the 1880's,"
Angell, Aud. A., 8p.m.

-eopened
that we are in compliance," said Duane
Pomeroy, president of the school board.
"But, if we are not, then I am sure the
board and the administrationt will want
to do whatever is necessary to come in-
to compliance."
The American Civil Liberties Union
is providing $10,000 financial backing
for the litigation, said Judy Davis,
director of the ACLU's Kansas chapter.
The parents' group estimates the full
cost of the lawsuit could exceed $12,000,
and it is seeking donations.
The Brown case began in 1951, when
20 black Topeka elementary students
brought legal action through their
parents alleging that white elementary
students were allowed to attend schools
in the districts in which they lived,
while black students were' forced out-
side their districts to separate all-black
schools.

DETROIT
GRAND RAPIDS

313-477-2181
616-949-9681

CLASSES BEGIN DEC 10
CPA
REVIEW.

Judge Rodgers
... reactivated case
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No.70
Friday, November 30, 1979
is edited-and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Good News!
ANNOUNCING
EXTENDED
Night Hours
Service until 10:45 PM
Monday - Friday
Starts Dec. 9
Ann Arbor
Transportation

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan