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November 29, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Antarctica
OClO. crash

AUSTR
q0

ALIA o0
*Auckland
Christchurch
NEW
ZEALAND Pa

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 29, 1979-Page 5
Carter defends decision on shah

ocific Ocean

kills

257

(Continued.from Page 1)
IN LONG BEACH, California, a
spokesman for McDonnell .Douglas,
which makes the DC-10,nsaid a cor-
porate team of experts was leaving
today for Auckland to help with the in-
vestigation.
Asked if the corporation-was thinking
of grounding DC-10s, the spokesman
replied: "Not to my knowledge."
The United States is sending an in-
vestigator to New Zealand as soon as
possible to help probe the crash of the
DC-10 in the Antarctic, the U.S.
National Transportation Safety Board
(NTSB) said.
THE NEW ZEALAND government
will be in charge of the investigation in-
to the crash, but the United States will
help as the country where the aircraft
was made.

DC-10 Jetliner
- .1--CrashesI
McMurdo
Sound
Mt. Erebus 0
-90 90
SO U THSOUTH
POL E 0A ME RICA
Indian
Ocon p

(Continued from Page 1)
other supporters of the shah to allow
him in.
But the president declared tht no one
else had played any role in his decision
or exerted any pressure on him.
WHILE OFFERING no new hope
that the crisis is nearing an end, Carter
cited a statement of support for the
release of the hostages, issued Tpesday
night on behalf of the United Nations
Security Council and said: "We expect
a further Security Council meeting on
Saturday at which more official action
may be undertaken to help in obtaining
release of American hostages.
"We hope that out of this exercist of
international law will come a peaceful
solution, because a peaceful solution is
preferable to the other remedies
available - for the United States and
for the world."
A TAB

In a solid show of support for
President Carter's stand in the Iran
crisis, the U.S. Senate voted 98-0
yesterday to demand the immediate
release of the hostages.
THE RESOLUTION called on the
United Nations Security Council to take
all measures to secure the hostages'
release.
The revolutionary government of
Iran yesterday filed a $56.5 billion suit
against the deposed shah and claimed
that all but 1.5 billion dollars of it had
been looted from the country during his
37-year reign.
The suit, filed in New York State
Supreme Court, alleges the shah
enriched himself, relatives and friends
by diverting government funds for their
own use.

THE SUIT ALLEGES the Pahlavi
Foundation was established in 1948 for
"holding shah's personal wealth," and
that under the shah; the government
diverted an estimated six billion dollars
in assets to the foundation.
Attorney Paul O'Dwyer, who
represents the new Iranian gover-
nment, said the shah took an estimated
$55 billion from his country, based on
information provdided by lawyers in
Iran.
The suit seeks to recover this sum.
plus another $1.5 billion in punitive
damages.
O'DWYER SAID the suit was filed in
New York because the shah is here and
many of his assets are believed to be
here as well.

5th Avenue at Liberty St. 761-9700
Formerly Fifth Forum Theater

J

ANTARCTICA
0

0 1000
Miles

AFRICA

Guess Whos
4.50
BARGAIN

FRANK CAPRA'S 1946
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
Kind-hearted banker (JAMES STEWART) feels he's a failure because he was
too busy helping people to make much money which he suddenly needs.
Through the timely intervention of angel Clarence, he soon regains his zest
for life as he realizes the sadness his friends and family would have suffered
had he not lived. A Season Greetings film that Capra made out of a Christmas
card. With LIONEL BARRYMORE and DONNA REED.
SUN: Hitchcock's THE THIRTY-NINE STEPS

MAP SHOWS LOCATION of Antarctica's Mount Erebus, one of the world's
tallest active volcanoes, where an Air New Zealand DC-10 crashed yester-
day killing all 257 persons aboard.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7 & 9:30

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

PROGRESS SLOW FOR WOMEN, MINORITIES:
Tenure process difficult

(Continued from Page 1)
quality of (the professor's) scholarship,
teaching, and service. We try to be ob-
jective as possible and leave out the
subjectivity."
The scarcity of women and minorities
in most departments also impedes the
development of their own support
groups and furthers isolation, accor-
ding to some faculty members. Ross
and other female faculty said this scar-
city results in a lack of role models for
new women faculty members and "to
provide assurance it's possible to rise
some day."
During the crucial years when many
women are seeking tenure they often
are nearing the end of their child-
bearing years. This very real conflict -
reduced to the-chilling phrase "book or
baby" - often can result in "terrible
problems," said a female full professor
in the School of Social Work, who asked
not to be identified.
SHE SAID she looks back with
"disgust" at the system which forced
her, and other female faulty, to begin
a family and launch a career in
academia simultaneously.To avoid this
conflict, this professor explained,
"Many women make a decision not to
have children - or to have children fir-
st - and then go for a Ph.D."
Some affirmative action steps are
aimed at opening up the process, and
enabling University administrators to
monitor the promotional and hiring
practices more closely. The University
now encourages departments and
schools to compile current lists of
qualified minority and female faculty
in the country, and requires depar-
tments to advertise openings publicly in
national trade journals. University
schools and departments also must
submit written explanations of each
hiring or promotional decision to the
administration. These reports state the
candidates' race and sex.
Because of their small numbers,
women and minority academics tend to
be called upon more frequently for
departmental committee assignments,
faculty and administrators agreed.
While this practice gives these faculty
members a voice in departmental
policies, committee assignments can
become a burden, particularly when
combined with teaching duties and the
pressures of research, said some
faculty members.
"COMMITTEE WORK is quite
demanding," Assistant Political Scien-
ce Prof. Mary Corcoran said. "It counts
toward very little credit when you come
up for tenure. This University gives
credit for research and teaching,
primarily research. Committee work
takes a lot of time from research."
In addition to committee obligations,
Uzoigwe, who has been active with
black campus organizations throughout
his ten years here, said, "Blacks are of-
ten pulled both ways: they are expected
to perform 100 per cent in their depar-
tmental work as well as at other ac-
tivities associated with being black,
such as Trotter House or the Center for
Afro-American Studies."
Some minority faculty members
spend extra time in preparation for
their courses because they are often
asked to teach minority-related classes
not directly in their field of specialty,
according to Uzoigwe. He said this
"stereotyping" is of "major concern"
to minority faculty "here and
elsewhere (in the United States)."
STEADY GAINS by women and
minorities into the ranks of assistant
professorships are no longer as easily

because of the decrease in promotions
of members of both sexes.
Consequently, although the percen-
tage of female promotions to associate
professor has doubled over the past1
four years, only three 'more women
were promoted this year than were
promoted four years ago - 17, up from
14.
ACTING DIRECTOR of Affirmative
Action Charles Allmand said "There is
nothing in the University's hiring prac-
tices that would give women and
minorities an advantagewbecause of
race or sex: "They are judged upon the
quality of their work just like anyone
else. If you move in that direction
(preferential treatment) you get
caught up in the backlash of reverse
discrimination."
In recent years, University ad-
ministrators have developed numerical
goals, rather than set quotas, for each
department in accordance with the
availability of qualified women and
minorities in the respective fields.
Allmand emphasized "The goals are
not quotas," but serve as "guidelines"
for administrators and the federal
government to judge what "good-faith
efforts" are being made by the depar-
tments.
Allmand cited attrition as a major
impediment to the University's efforts
toward meeting its faculty affirmative
action goals. While University officials
say complete statistics are unavailable
on attrition, Allmand said, "Our goals
(the number of women and minorities
needed to meet departmental
guidelines) seem to be larger this year
than last year. We're losing minorities,
particularly blacks."
OF THE 136 minority professors on
the Ann Arbor campus last year, nearly
half were Asians according to statistics
from the Faculty Senate Assembly's
Committee on the Economic Status of
the Faculty (CESF).
"There is a fear that blacks are being
subsumed by this minority exercise,
and that the whole goal of the BAM
(Black Action Movement protest of
1970) strike is being lost," said
Uzoigwe
"Salary is the main thing we can't
compete in," particularly against
private industry, Allmand says. The
mean salary of minority faculty (for
1978-79) is lower than that of their white
colleagues, and that of women faculty
is lower than men professors, accor-
ding to statistics made available by
CESF.
Allmand says other universities
sometimes offer chairmanships or
special fellowships as further in-
ducements.
While he asserts that "most people
now recognize we owe women and
minorities some advantage and are
willing to provide some correction
without creating chaos among the
faculty," such chaos could be caused by
unusually rapid promotions or other in-
ducements to minorities and women,
Allmand said.
THE REASONS for leaving the
University, however, are often personal
and vary considerably among in-
dividuals. "It's hard to get at why
(minority faculty) have left - money
'doesn't necessarily move people," Cash
says.
University efforts to increase women
and minority representation in top
tenured ranks are closely linked with
affirmative action hiring incentives.
Such affirmative actions efforts in
recruitment must now contend with a
tighter University budget than during
nat vars of nhvsical and financial ex-

ultimately requires stronger recruit-
ment efforts and encouragement of
women and minorities in graduate, un-
dergraduate, and even high school
programs.
TOMORROW -
Student involvement in
the tenure process

John NATIONAL
Beush' LAMPOONs
Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri-Adults $1.50
til 6:30 (or capacity)
Wed, Sat, Sun 1:50, 3:50, 6:00,
8:00, 10:00
Wed, Sat, Sun-Adults $1.50 til 2:15
(or capacity) Adults $2.50 til 4:30
(or capacity)

Tm Ann Arbor Film Cooperit Presents at Aud. A:
Thursday, November 29

r
$1.50

JE T'AIME, JE T'AIME
(Alain Resnais & Jacques Sternberg, 1968) 8 only-AUD A
A man who has been saved from suicide is made the subject of a scientific
experiment. He is put into a time machine to relive one moment of his life.
The machine runs amok and he becomes trapped in the past. Visually stunning;
intellectually provocative, "Resnais succeeds beautifully in his patchwork
quilt of time..."-Richard Roud. French with subtitles.

I

UNE FEMME DOUCE
(Robert Bresson, 1969) 9:45 only-AUD A
A haunting and sensual work by one of France's major filmmakers. Based on
a Dostoyevsky short story the plot concerns marital oppression and suicide.
Starnthe beautiful DOMINIQUE SANDA in her first major role. In French,
SATURDAY: Richard Pryor in WHICH-WAY IS UP?
and BLUE COLLAR at ML.B

At

- INEMAII1
Presents TO41O
THE FILMS OF CHICK STRAND
Appearing in person to show and talk about her work is
filmmaker CHICK STRAND. Audiences of the Ann Arbor Film
Festival will remember her films as highlights of recent fes-
tivals. In the forefront of the current avant-garde movement
in cinema, her films explore and experiment with new pos-
sibilities in personal filmmaking. Ms. Strand will discuss her
films following the presentation. Tomorrow: UP IN SMOKE
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE $1.50 7:00 only
With the support of MCA sponsored in part by MSA

NruSl .:_.
187A

i

One of Ann Arbor's most cherished traditions is the Choral
Union's performance of "Messiah". Once again, under the direc-
tion of Donald Bryant, the Choral Union and soloists present
Handel's great oratorio to begin a joyous Christmas season.
Soloists are Elizabeth Parcells, soprano; Victoria Grof, con-
tralto; David Eisler, tenor; and Donald Bell, bass. Performances
Fri. & Sat. at 8:30; Sun. at 2:30. Hill Auditorium
Tehaikov~kyj'
"Mueraekr"Bk
A sparkling entertainment awaits the whole family as the
Pittsburgh Ballet presents the wonderment of Christmas seen
through the eyes of a little girl, Clara. Five performances of this
Tchaikovsky favorite (taped music). Thurs., Fri., Sat. evenings
at 8:00; Sat. & Sun. at 3:00. Power Center

Gift Ceritificates
for concerts available
Hill Auditorium, and Power Center
are on the main campus of The University of Michigan.
Ample concert parking.

I

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