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November 16, 1979 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-16

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 16, 1979-Page 7
R ECO RDS

I

.;fir
.

---m. -

spirational instrumentals that weave
the four musical personalities of the
mod kid into one; and gone (sniff) is the
angry, powerful crash ending of "Love,
Reign O'er Me", taking with it an ar-
mful of goose bumps that the original
never fails to produce.
Part of the problem is the placement
of songs on the soundtrack. The original
album told a story with the music,
logically" starting on side one and en-
ding on side four. The new soundtrack
starts out in the same place, with "I am
the Sea," but after this the similarities
end. The song order is rearranged, and
cuts are shortened or deleted
altogether. "Helpless Dancer" is a
mere 22 seconds long (hardly
justifiable as a song), and one whole
side of the double album set is devoted
to 60's tunes that are supposed to add an
authentic touch to the movie.
UNFORTUNATELY, these cuts are
not the Who, and they only serve to
disappoint and confuse the listener.
What is going on? Perhaps they want to
confuse us so much that we must see
the film to sort it all out. ,
So what is left of Quadrophenia? The
basic tunes are still intact, but violins
soar into the background too often. How

Quadrophenia
The Who
Polydor

typical of filmmakers to add a touch of
shmaltz, even to The Who. Skillful use
of violins in rock is rare, and the effect
in this case is depowering and discon-
certing.
A bright spot for those who have
already made the budget-fatal pur-
chase: The remixing job done by
engineer Cy Langston has given.: dep-
th to most of the cuts that w as lacking

By MARY FINN
If you liked the rhythm of the rain on
the Who's original release of
Quadrophenia, you'll be disappointed
by the motion picture soundtrack of the
same name from the new Who film.
Just putting the title on the album
'cover didn't quite do the job. Gone are
the thunderstorm and moody sea tran-
stionĀ§ between songs; gone are the in-

in the earlier .version. Right and left
separation of tracks is much more
pronounced, so if you own headphones,
be sure to surround your ears and en-
joy. Entwhistle's passionate horns and
Townsend's guitar call out to one ear,
and Daltry's voice with Moon's haun-
ting drums drive into the other.
It is a small consolation.
The three new tunes on the album all

sound rather contrived. All subtlety,
both musical and lyrical, is absent.
"Four Faces" beats the listener over
the head with its message:
You think it's funny, Ican tell,
Well, you don't understand too well
Iget so lonely and turned around
I can't let it bring me down . .
I've got four heads ...
"Get Out and Stay Out" has one line
of lyrics rearranged in different patter-
ns, pounds a 4/4 beat, but somehow the
tune rocks and redeems itself. Sort of.
It is disappointing to hear slap-together
tunes like these that sound as if the
producers needed somethine,
anything, oh, about three minutes long,
or so.
WHEN THE WHO play rock and roll,
they can't be equalled. The beauty of
the group is its ability to kick out rowdy
jams and classical rocking instrumen-
talists and even the reworked versions
of the old classics remain respectable.
Still, Quadrophenia revisited is not
recommended for the serious Who buff.
It's a pale imitation of the original, and
as intempting as last week's bread.

IG/I1TNIA'G PRODUCTIONS PRESEN/TS IN !DANCE-CONVCERT

SON IC'S
R[NDEZVOUS BAND
AT RANDOM#
ST[VE !NE!WI1OUS[
&THIE NUKI!ABI[LII!S

Am 't no fool like apro fool

DAWCv

By MARK DIGHTON
Maybe it's just that these demanding
assignments bring out the serious jour-
nalist in me, but my prospective inter-
viewee called and introduced himself
as "Gerry the Fool" I couldn't think of
anything to ask him but whether or not
he signed his checks that way. I mean, I
could just see some turquoise-smocked
Kresge's matron saying, "we only cash
checks for purchase price, Mr. Fool."
Luckily, upon meeting him I
discovered that he does have another
name, Gerry Dzuiblinski. Gerry also
didn't fit my expectations for a "fool"
either. I knew a fool in the sixth grade.
He used to button his shirt buttons to his
sweater holes. Gerry, in contrast to my
preconceptions, was quiet and very
thoughtful. He had clearly done his
homework on fooldom and had actually
been schooled in his trade. In addition,
each of his shirt buttons was affixed in
its proper location.
Gerry obvious ihas irather unique
definition of "fool." "I don't even
know," he says. Given the wide variety
of things he does in performance, it's
easy to understand Gerry's difficulties
in definition. His workshops in East
Quad on. Thursday nights at 7:30 are
billed as "Mime/Storytheatre
Workshops," but his weekly show
("The Gerry the Fool Show," cleverly
enough) on cable Channel 9 has been
known to encompass everything from
puppets to masks and music.
HIS NEXT MAJOR project, a
musical comedy called A Night on the
Town-which he and his cohort Alex
Sergay will perform tonight and
tomorrow night at 8 p.m. at the New Old
Brick (above the Star Bar on Main
Street)-promises to be quite different
from both of his other performances.
"Whatever works," quips the fool.
"You see, It comes down to com-
munication, I guess; the essence of it is
communication," he adds. And for
foolishness, some of his material is not
so laughable. "Part of communicating
is funny, is ironic, is satirical, in non-
sensical. Part of communicating is
very serious, too, and very intense,
very emotional."
He's also great at parties, where he
tends to lie on the floor like a corpse.
GERRY THE FOOL has the creden-
tials for doing the diverse work he
does. He graduated from Antioch
College in 1975 with his own per-
soalize degree-Communications
and Growth Environments-"a com-
bination of therapy and art." Since
Benefit
A benefit will take place at the Ark
this weekend for Michael Cooney, on
of America's foremost folk musician
who was seriously injured last August
while driving his vahi on the East Coast.
Hospital costs to pay for extensive
surgery have been staggering. Concer-
tina player Barry O'Neil, who perfor-
med with Cooney at last February's
Ceilidh at the Ark, and 79-year-old local
bones wizard Percy Danforth and his
band will perform both Friday and
Saturday nights at 9 p.m.
"['4W ToPUBLISH

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society behind the veil of mirth.
Political activism is an important part
of his comment on society. Two of his
latest performances have been at an
antinuclear rally in Windsor and a
benefit for a Catholic worker's
organization.
For those old-timers, Gerry also
studied with Ken Feit-better known as
"Ken the Fool" (no relation)-for
many years an Ann Arbor institution.
Ken hasn't been around in a couple of
years, though. According to Gerry, he's
now in Russia, though I've always been
told they don't laugh there. Gerry also
isn't around Ann Arbor all the time,
'either. Actually, he's a native Detroiter
who spends his time divided between
the two cities.
IF YOU'RE INTERESTED in seeing
Gerry, his workshop in the basement of
East Quad (Room 3 Tyler), on Thur-
sday night is on a drop-in basis. Anyone
who would like to can "sit in and par-
tici-pate or just kind of observe, if they
don't feel like participating." The tap-
ing of his television show is also open to
the public. It takes place at 8 p.m. on
Friday night at the Public Access Cable
Television offices above the fire station
at Fifth and Huron.
Of course, you can also stay at home
and watch one of the four weekly
airings on cable television, and not even
have to worry about a video camera
running over your toe.
Incidentally, Gerry is also available
for lessons in buttoning shirts, for
those who are interested.

4uNOV 17
8pm .1979
ANN ARBOR
FIFTH s ANN SrTEETS

DANCE,
adm.
$400
at the
door

@7473 LIEHT~ipJ
PROOJCTlOad
NA. 2

GAR ',S#'""

'NI~'ZIr

tbl (Gour
Invites You To
Join Him For:
Monday:
PIZZA NIGHT
6pm-12a.m.

Gerry the Fool

Tuesday:
SOUP & SALAD
6p.m.-1 2a.m.
Wednesday:
PASTA NIGHT
6 pm-1.1pm.
Thursday:
PITCHER NIGHT
8p.m.-2a.m.
th.C ,'~ 4
__ . - o

UNMINI

then, he has studied Gestalt Therapy,
psychodrama, visual arts, music,
ballet, modern dance, gymnastics, and
voice.
Not all at once I assume, though any
one of his performances is liable to
touch on each of these fields. He has
also worked as a counselor, an
educational consultant, and the coor-
dinator of the Detroit Free School.
Presently, he is teaching classes at
Wayne State Community College in
mime and storytheatre. In addition, he
claims never having had any instruc-

tion in buttoning his shirt. Quite the
clever fool.
CONTRARY TO appearances, Gerry
doesn't see himself as a fool all that dif-
ferent from fools throughout history.
(No Richard Nixon jokes, here,
nosiree!) "The jester was often the
person who could say something to the
King that no one else in his court could
say to him." He believes that his
position as a fool allows him to say
serious things and thought-provoking
things about both individuals and

U-M
STYLI STS
at the
UNION
"This is where
the Good Guys go"

..e .. ,e a" -

"q

x

1140 S. University 668-8411

Mon.-Sat. 11a.m.-2a.m.
Sun. 3p.m.-12a.m.

'Pd

John Huston Retrospective

1948

THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE
Huston won Academy Awards for both screenplay and direction of this highly
acclaimed adventure tale about the power of gold. Focusing on the tensions
that run high among three prospectors who strike it rich in Mexico, this vivid
reflection of post-war America achieves a reverential grace and beauty that
pushes the film high into the ranks of American cinema. Best Supporting
Actor Award for Huston's father, Walter. With TIM HOLT and HUMPHREY
BOGART.
Sat: CARNAL KNOWLEDGE

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:OO& 9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

TIRED OF BEER SOAKED
PINBALL MACHINES AND
I PEOPLE WHO DON'TI
CARE IF YOU'VE LOST I
I ~YOUR QUARTER? I

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