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November 16, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

rCINEMA I

Page 6-Friday, November 16, 1979-The Michigan Daily
BIKE EUROPE OFFERS PENNY-PINCHING PLANS

1

4 ,, .
t4

NORMA RAE

rto4MI

(Martin Ritt, 1979)
Based on a true story of one woman's fight against worker exploitation
by a southern textile firm, this moving film tells Norma Rae's story. Sally
Field gives a Cannes Film Festival award-winning performance as the
young, divorced mother who teams up with a Jewish New York union
organizer to rally the community behind them in their fight for justice.
With RON LIEBMAN and.BEAU BRIDGES. (1.14 m7.).
ANAGELL HALL $1,50 7:00 & 9:15

7r-

1,

A2 firm helps

students travel

Tomorrow:TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE
DESTROY ALL MONSTERS
Sponsored by the Michigan Council for the Arts
Publicity sponsored b MSA

The Ann Arbor Film Coopersfive Presents at MLB: $1.50
Friday, November 16
THE MAZE
(Willian Cameron Menzies, 1953) 7 & 10:20 MLB 3
3-D is back. A spooky Enclish castle is inhabited by a strange freak of nature
in this classic 1750's 3-D chiller. The special red and green 3-D glasses will be
provided. Plus short: A 3-D featurette containing highlights from The Creature
from the Black Lagoon and It Come from Outer Space.
BARBARELLA
(Roger Vadim, 1968) 8:40 only MLB 3
In this intelligent, underrated spoof of the '60's stereotypes, JANE FONDA
PLAYS A KIND OF SEXUAL Alice-in-Wonderland in the year 40,000 assigned to
locate a missing scientist. Along the way, she meets the usual sci-fitypes,
plus an inept revolutionary and a handsome spaceman who makes love "the
old way." A woman takes on technology and wins? Only in a Jane Fonda film,
and one that deserves to be seen more often. With MILO O'SHEA, DAVID
HEMMINGS. JOHN PHILIP LAW.
Tomorrow- Hitchcock's PSYCHO AND Powell's PEEPING TOM at MLB 4; and
Satyajit Ray's THE CHESS PLAYERS AT Aud. A.
GREAT SAVINGS ON,
NATURAL &
HEALTH FOODS
Giant Warehouse Sale-Up to 50 % below retail
on natural foods-also vitamins, cosmetics,
shampoos, juicers & appliances, books
and much more.
ONE DAY ONLY
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER18-
10 am-4 pm
At Midwest Natural Foods
170 Aprill Drive
Left off Jackson Road at Curt Terova Cadillac
({ mile west of Wagner Road)

By JAMES KOBIELUS
Picture this: You and some friends
are cycling through the lazy, hilly Brit-
tany countryside during summer
vacation. Though the pace has been
leisurely, you are road-weary, so you
stop for the night in a quaint farming
village. The hospitable Britons invite
you in for a night of folk dancing and
drunken revelry-two cultures come
together, new friendships are formed.
The next day you continue on to another
'town, another adventure..
Idle fantasies? They don't have to be.
There is an Ann Arbor firm that will
expose students to a side of the
European continent that tourists rarely
see, and help them pinch pennies in the
process.
FOR THE PAST two summers, Bike
Europe has brought college students
together to take cycling trips
throughout England, Holland, Belgium,
Germany, France, and Luxembourg.
Bob Brown and Tom Tiplady, co-
owners of Bike Europe, describe their
programs as a "very economical" way
to see Europe. The tours offer a "whole
Join The
Doily,

different flavor to the countryside,"
reported one University student who
made the trip. The trips range in price
from $450 for the two-week excursion to
$600 for six weeks, not including hotel
accommodations. The price includes
round-trip airfare to and from London,
campground fees, ferry tickets, and use
of Bike Europe's vast library of travel
information. The cyclist must provide
his or her own bicycle, tent, food expen-
ses, and repair expenses.
The organizers of Bike Europe have
tailored their tour packages to appeal
to the casual bikei' who is interested in
traveling the back country of rural
Europe. Of the three tour packages of-
fered, two proceed at a leisurely pace
over smooth terrain, taking in 40-50
miles a day, settling down at cam:
pgrounds each night. On the "six coun-

try loop," the bikers start out in Lon-
don, cycle through rural England, take
a ferry across the English Channel,
amble through Belgium, Holland,
Luxembourg, Germany, and France,
and end up in Paris. The "regional
France" tour meanders through the
backroads and small villages of rural
France. For experienced bikers, Bike
Europe offers a more strenuous jour-
ney that traverses through the French
Alps on the way to the Riviera.
University student Jeff Rautiola, who
traversed the six-country tour during
Summer, 1978, said he thinks it is the
"best way to spend a summer."
Rautiola explained that he had never
before traveled a bike hike that
long, and he admitted that there were
some problems. "We couldn't pack too
much weight on our bicycles, so we had

to keep our luggage down to a bare
minimum," he said.
He added that continual biking for
weeks tends to weaken one's read end.
THE MOST memorable times of his
trip, Rautiola recalled, were when he
met people in small towns along the
route. "Most of the people we met were
very friendly, especially the Ger-
mans," he said. He fondly recalled a
group of German campers who treated
the bikers to bratwurst, and a German
jogger who went out of his way to guide
the lost bikers to a hotel on a rainy
night.
The organizers of Bike Europe are
currently planning next summer's ex-
cursions. For further information, they
ask people to call 668-0529 or write
BIKE EUROPE, P.O. Box 7928, Ann
Arbor, MI 48107.

Five SAID eandidates vying
for LSA- SGExecutive Council

"i16 17 -)
:. ov 8-ati.' r

la (Boliciic
_ The Un[iv est
-- '.of \Michian
S 00 0of Musc
.1 Opera Theatre

(Continued from Page 1)
LSA-SG.
Mondry described educational
development as a theme for the party.
"It's a theme in the sense that when we
all came together, that is what we all
felt was the-most important role of LSA-
SG," he said.
SAID MEMBERS plan to push for
educational development through a
number of avenues. According to Wert,
two of the major avenues are for LSA-
SG to develop survey courses for those
not majoring in a particular subject,
and to increase student involvement in
tenure decisions.
Alonso agreed. He claimed that such
courses should be offered "to provide
an opportunity for students to think

critically about the world - instead of
being afraid of grade competition." On
tenure, Alonso said, "Students should
have an equal voice in selecting
professors. Students are the best
evaluators of teaching and should have
extensive involvement in the tenure
process."
SAID also wants changes in the im-
plementation of affirmative action
policies in the University's student
enrollment. Claiming that current
policies are "wrong and unfair," Alon-
so said the University should increase,
its number of minority students.
MONDRY SAID he strongly favors
having a student representative on the
Executive Committee of the college.
Mondry called for the publishing of

Executive Committee meeting
minutes, the opening of its meetings to
the public, and the eventual placing of
students on the committee. "I can't
believe," he said, "that the one and
only committee which makes all final
decisions for the college has no student
input and is not even accessible to the
students."
Talmers said she was particularly in-
terested in promoting the freshperson
seminar program. "The seminars
promote student-teacher contact and
allow for a student to explore more
specific areas of study," she said.
Also on the SAID slate is vice-
presidential candidate Kim Brower:

Regents discuss salary lists;
meet with MSA and SACUA

(Continued from Page 1)
after a recommendation made by the
state attorney general. In April 1974, af-
ter Eastern Michigan University
disclosed its salary list, Dunn .once
again asked the Regents to release
their salaries. The Regents- refused on
both occasions.
The executive officers are expected
today to tell the Regents that the state
law should not be challenged, and
recommend a change in the Univer-
sity's policy forbidding public
disclosure of salary information.
During the afternoon meeting, the
Regents heard from the Michigan
Student Assembly (MSA) about the
current state of that group's operations,
.and from members of the Michigan
Republicans Club concerning a com-
plaint it had about MSA's funding of
several of the club's projects.

THEN THE REGENTS were tole
that research expenditures at th
University increased 18.4 per cen
during fiscal year 1979.
In giving his annual report on the
money placed in the University's
research budget, Vice-President for
Research Charles Overberger said the
University has received "healthy in
creases" in the amounts of outside
research funds.
"As far as the goals of the University
go, we seem to be holding our own and
are even doing a little better than an-
ticipated," Overberger said.
He added that the University is
ranked fourth or fifth in the overall
volume of research funds, and eighth or
ninth in federal research funds.
IN RESPONSE TO questioning,
Overberger also said the executive of-
ficers do not feel placing a full-time

d
e
t
e
s
r
-

person in Washington to help the
University get more federal funds is a
"productive" idea.
"Our study is leading us to believe
that a full-time person in Washington
might in fact be a waste of money,"
Smith said.

GARGOYLE FILMS presents
RERECCA F
Starring: LAURENCE OL IVIER
Directed by: ALFRED HITCHCOCK"
ACADEMY AWARD
BEST PICTURE
HALEAUD., Fri. Nov.16, 7 & 9p.m.
COMING On I O
DEC. 1st all $lond Man Wffh On lck Soe
The University of Michigan
Men's Glee Club
LEONARD JOHNSON, Director
Wayne State University
Men's Glee Club
HARRY LANGSFORD, Director
IN CONCERT
NOVEMBER 17, 1979-8:00 p.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $4, $3, or $2 (student $1)
MAIL ORDERS SEND CHECK TO:
Ticket Manager, The University of Michigan Men's Glee Club
1024 Administration Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Hill box office open November 12, 9-5
-
:, r 0

Econ Omists
predict
l'mild'1980
recession
(Continued from Page 1)
sreporting figures to the general public,
uses price; comparisons _for only a
select number of goods that consumers
are likely, to purchase, such as food
products and automobiles. The GNP-
deflator rate includes price com-
putations on such items as the price of
steel and industrial chemicals. The
Consumer Price Index figure for 1980 is
predicted by the economists to be 9.3
per cent.I
The economists base their recovery
assumptions on postponement of
scheduled Social Security tax increases
and a "modest easing of monetary
policy."
To further stimulate recovery, "it
seems appropriate to us to give careful
consideration to additional tax stimulus
programs in mid-1980," said. Shapiro,
who presented the forecast to the con-
ference audience.
THlE ECONOMICS Department has
been making such forecasts since 1953
using the "Michigan Model," a.,com-
puterized system using both economic
and statistical analysis. A huge number
of figures are fed into the complex-
model-which is constantly, being
revised-to produce the forecasts.
The reliability of the predictions vary
from year to year;' but last year's
predicted general trends were fairly
close to reality.
WE ARE LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE
wade.Ta~m & AoocIcItei, Inc
25185 Goddard Road'-
- Taylor, Michigan 48180.
313 -291-5400
Edmond; Engineering9 Inc
1501 W. Thomas
Bay City, Michigan 48706
517-686-3100
Gronger Ernineering, Inc.
314 Haynes St., Cadillac, Ml 49601
616 -775-9754
Impact
Improved Planning Action

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