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November 09, 1979 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 12-Friday, November 9, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Poetry Readings
by
ROBERT HASS
TONIGHT-Nov. 9
OPEN TO PUBLIC-FREE
8:00 p.m. Pendleton Room
Michigan Union

Experts
(Continued from Page 1)
way houses, after which they would be
paroled. Esquina claims this massive
release would have no effect on the
crime rate.
KIME RESPONDED to this
suggestion by pointing out that
Michigan has the highest proportion of
criminals in halfway houses of any

debate prison proposals

state in the country.
Anderson stressed that overcrowding
in state institutions, has resulted in
"prisoners living in substandard
housing." Besides Jackson, Anderson
used the facility in Ionia, among others,
as examples of prisons with unaccep-
table living conditions.
He cited a recent decision to incar-

cerate, rather than hospitalize, men-
tally ill convicts as a major factor in the
overcrowding. Anderson claimed that
at Jackson alone there are "something
like 400 people" who have been
classified "mentally ill."
ESQUINA, ALTHOUGH opposed to
Milliken's plan, agreed that Jackson
has to go, saying that it "should have

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been destroyed soon after it was
opened."
Esquina also talked about the reasons
behind overcrowding, listing longer
sentences in general, mandatory
minimum sentencing, and. Proposal B
(denial of time off for good behavior) as
the major factors.
Esquina said that in the current
system, inmates are assigned "risk
factors" based on "pre-incarceration
considerations" such as juvenile police
record, drug use, and marital status.
KIME SAID although "prison con-
struction should be absolutely the last
resort", it is necessary due to the ex-
treme conditions in state institutions.
He compared the prison system to "a
sinking ship with nothing to throw
overboard."
Magid and Esquina both disagreed
with Kime, claiming the department
should have done more to stop Proposal
B.
SHE ADDED that the state "cannot
afford.. . to warehouse people in in-
stitutions and hope to benefit our
society.
Anderson advocated the prison con-
struction proposal, saying "We need
new institutions immediately" and if
they are not built, he is "sure the courts
will mandate it."
The proposed prisons would be 21 in
number, with a maximum capacity of
500.
Student
makes bid
to oppose
incumbent
(Continued from Page ')'
the four Council seats currently held by
the Democrats (the oth~er seven are
held by Republicans). "It's difficult
when you have a minority party to do
anything, but I have good vibrations
from the other people in the party," she
said.
COUNCILMAN AND University
graduate student Ken Latta (D-First
Ward), said Wednesday, "It's no
general secret that I'm supporting
Stacy." He explained, "Earl doesn't
have a whole lot of visibility."
Second Ward Councilwoman Leslie
Morris, another of Greene's
Democratic colleagues, yesterday
voiced support for Stephanopoulos'
candidacy. First Ward Councilwoman
Susan Greenberg, also a Democrat, last
night said she was told by party leaders
not to signal support for either can-
didate until after the primary.
The incumbent Greene said, "The
basic question for voters is, who can
best represent the ward and who is
qualified and has the most experience."
THE CITY primary which will take
place in February, will determine
which of the two candidates will run on
"
Yti) hare to gire the a oters
something to (respond to and,
get stident s interested in
Polities agait.'
' =- Stai.y Setlrrphrnpoitis.
se-oid fW.,rd ( oinil
C:andiate
the Democratic slate in the Second
Ward.
"We're planning on running a
primary and I want to address the
issues," said Stephanopoulos. She ad-

ded, "When you have competition it
tends to put out the best in both can-
didates."
The student candidate, who will be
graduating at the end of next year, said
she plans to stay in Ann Arbor to attend
graduate school at the University. "I'll
be in Ann Arbor. I'm committed to the
place, I like it here," she said.

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