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November 09, 1979 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-09

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Canham.
By BILLY NEFF
Last of a two-part series
b During the Michigan-Ohio State football game, the
inimitable Wayne Woodrow Hayes tore down the
Michigan Stadium sideline markers in a fit of rage.
Another inimitable gentleman, named Don Canham,
;made a characteristic remark when asked his
:thoughts on Hayes' actions. "He (Hayes) is great for
,the game; he packs 'em in," said Canham.
Canham is a businessman, first and foremost.
What he sells is Michigan sports and he views himself
as the corporate head. "We're a self-operating unit;
rwe're a corporation. You've all of the problems in-
A volved in a business. There's an $11 million cash flow
F And 200 employees," Canham asserted.
: BUT THERE remains a catch in all these figures.
$11 million may'not mean much if one assesses a
normal-size corporation. "One of the deceiving things
,is that we don't pay any rent or taxes," pointed out
dCanham.
: Without those costs, it is easier now to understand,
,the enormity of the athletic budget. As Canham adds,
,We're self-sufficient. We're one of the few schools in
the country that can say that."
Canham makes big, big dollars for his, employer,
and that is his ticket to success. He will continue his
success, in business terms, with attractions like the
Slippery Rock-Shippensburg State football game.
"WE DO NOT make any money off of it; we're not
trying to. We're helping the Michigan marching ban-
ds, the high school bands, the two schools and the
awomen's athletic department, who is selling some
'tickets," asserted Canham.
'There is a discrepancy here, too. By making the
Slippery Rock game the same day as Band Day, he
4iIled two birds with one stone. He didn't lose the
,roney he normally would have by allowing the high

NCL UBS, WANT MONEY. S TA TUIS

'an't please everyone

school bands in free on a Saturday. And having Band
Day on the same day as 'the Rock, he still main-
tained this traditional event with the bands and made
money in the process.
Next year, Canham has more in the offing for foot-
ball fanatics and for the athletic department, too.
"There's no question we're going to. We could bring
them back again, or maybe Grambling, a Mid-
American Conference game, a doubleheader or a
Friday-Saturday game. Maybe the service
academies; why not the Army-Navy game?" he
asked.
"IT'S A GREAT thing for the smaller schools; it's a
showcase for small college football. We're as concer-
ned with the small schools as we are with the large
ones. We don't want to put them out of business,"' he
continued.
You don't have to read between the lines to know
that yes, they're being showcased, but that it's also
another way of reaping profit. Tickets are Canham's
staple to success and therefore, the more he sells, the
larger his program gets.
Canham doesn't see any way that women's
athletics will bring home the same amount of bacon
the men do, and thus, his views are skeptical on
enlarging the woman's budget. "We have the same
number of women's and men's teams. We treat 'em
equally. The women we have working for us, they just
love it. Nationally, we are really recognized for it
(treatment of women), he boasted.
"BUT YOU CANNOT spend equal money on
women's sports as men's. You spend a million dollars
on football and make five; you can't spend a million
dollars on women's field hockey," Canham declared.
Canham also expressed concern over the gover-

4 TEAMS GRASPING FOR CROWN:
Pac-10 title still up in the ai

nment's Title Nine regulations with regard to
equality in sports. "With Title Nine the way-it is being
interpreted, there is no problem. The danger is if they
(HEW). make a new set of rules. A lot of people are
afraid you'll have to drop men's sports."
Canham, nevertheless, believes his treatment of
women's athletics is fair. "We devote more money
from the athletic department (to women) than any
school in the country. I hope we can keep it that
way," he said.
SOME SPORTS, especially club sports, desire both
additional funds and varsity status. Concerning this,
Ganham said, "I would think that soccer would be the
next sport we'll add on the varsity level. If you add
soccer, you have to add a women's sport. That is our
philosophy. We have 80 scholarships for everything
besides football and soccer. And if you add another
sport, you bring everybody down to a lower level,"
noted Canham.
Once again, there is money involved and Canham
sees little return in adding varsity sports. So soccer
will stay at its present level, as will other club sports
and the status quo will be preserved.
On a different issue, however, of women being
passed up at Michigan football games, Canham
would like to see changes made. "The thing that
bothers me is where are the students with courage
who say, cut this nonsense out. We're only hoping that
we can stop it and make sure no one gets hurt. We
have no 'take charge' kids in that area; they have not
shown any guts yet," concluded Canham.
In Canham's eyes, money is always a common
denominator and in this equation, people such as
Woody Hayes just multiply the numerator.
Walton's '
injuries
have a dif- 0
he Huskies co tinue
g defenseonu
game. But
h USC and SAN DIEGO (AP) - Bill
the Rose Walton has a small stress frac-
ture in his left foot and will be-
16 of the 22 sidelined for at leastasix more
skies boast weeks, the San Diego Clippers
ners in the announced yesterday.
he season, Walton, who has been idle for
on 17 punt four days and missed the Clip-
ns went for ! pers' 15 National Basketball
ere over 60 Association games thus far this
season, had his foot placed in a
nd Arizona cast, the team said.
m at best. THE FRACTURE was
y), always V diagnosed by Dr. Tony Daley of <
o different Los Angeles in consultation with <
onert has Dr. F.W. Wagner of Whittier,
d 1,655 yar- Calif. The Clippers said the six-
of 67.8 per foot-11 center was told he needs
t second in continued rest.
Id. Walton, who signed with the
can go to Clippers during the off-season af-
n their last ter playing out his option with the
ts last two Portland Trail Blazers, suffered
gton loses the injury on Sept. 28.
The Clippers said the fracture
(3-2 in the had been difficult to pinpoint x
Rose Bowl because the pain Walton has ex-
Sun Devils perienced was in a different area
UCLA and than the fracture. Walton's injury
o lose their had been diagnosed earlier as a
ton loses to sprained ligament in his left foot.
antamaaamminy} ma

The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 9, 1979-Page 11
TECHNOLOGY AND
POLICY AT MIT
A MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM designated for
persons wanting to participate in formulating policies for
the development, use and control of technology and its
consequences. Students form individual curricula to work
on issues such as solar energy, the economics and legal
aspects of materials recycling and the use of automation in
manufacturing.
For information write:
Prof. Richard de Neufville
Rm 1-138, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology
Cambridge, Massachusetts
02139
nnumllllnunlltmmilounHII~lunlrmelnallllilmuam nmuiiliililllllll i i llllummrlllllulalillnra

By PETE BARBOUR
Does anyone think the tie-breaking
.formula in the Big 10 is complicated?
Well, the Pacific 10 conference makes
the Big 10's tie-breaking traumas seem
.easy, by comparison.
-For beginners, four teams (USC,
,Washington, Stanford and Arizona
State) still have an opportunity to
receive a Rose Bowl invitation: Of those
four teams, USC and Washington have
the best chance.
Allegations against Arizona State for
having ineligible players on their team
drake the outcome of the race less
:.predictable than it is. If these
allegations are proven to be true, none
-of the Sun Devils games will be counted
in the standings.
Most importantly, that means
Washington's lone conference loss to
ASU will not be counted, and this would
require USC to defeat Washington and
UCLA to ensure a trip to Pasadena.
USC (4-0-1 in conference play)

defeats Washington, the Trojans will be
Pasadena-bound for yet anotherhyear.
Heisman Trophy candidate Charles
White paces the Trojan ground game.
In eight games, White has run for 6.2
yards per carry, 170.8 yards a game
and 14 touchdowns. With Trojan quar-.
terback Paul McDonald's passig (te96
passes for 1,665 yards),andder te USC offes
running, it's no wonde th S fense

Pacibf ic 1 0 Stanings

USC ....................
Washington ..........
Stanford .............
Arizona State ..........
Oregon ................
California ...............
Arizona .................
Washington State......
UCLA ..................
Oregon State..........

W L
4 0
4 1
3 1

3
2
3
2
1
1

2
2
4
3
4
3

T
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

averages 33.2 points per gam
The offense, however, will
ficult game at Washington. T
top the conference in scorin
giving up only 12.9 points per
Washington must defeat botl
Washington State to go to
Bowl.
Loaded with experience (1
starters are seniors), the Hu
one of the finest punt return
country in Mark Lee. For t
Lee has averaged 13.8 yards
returns. Three of those retur
touchdowns, all of which w
yards.
The chances for Stanford a
State to win the title are sli
Stanford (3-1-1 in Pac-10 pla
known as a passing team, is n
this season. QB Turk Sch
passed for 16 toughdowns an(
ds with a completion rate(
cent. Those stats put Schoner
the nation, ahead of McDonal
The only Way Stanford,
Pasadena is if: one, they wir
two games; two, USC loses i
contests; and three, Washin
to Washington State.
The odds on Arizona State
conference) getting to thel
are extremely high. The S
must win tough battles with
Arizona, USC and Stanford ti
last two games and Washingt
Washington State.

Oler hreoo Om hrbor
4 W. a4 V omOA's CA 4,

---..

Upset-mnded Purdue
must bowl 'over Blue
By ERIC LUTTINEN
On November sixth, 1976, the Michigan Wolverines were undefeated, sporting
an 8-0 mark and ranked first in the nation. Then they played the upset specialists,
the "Spoilermakers" of Purdue on that fateful day. Bob Wood's last ditch field goal
try was wide, and the Spoilermakrs had done their thing.
With the emergence of Mark Herrmann at quarterback, Purdue has become a
legitimate power in the Big Ten along with Michigan and Ohio State. This is
evident as the Boilermakers are only one game behind the "Big Two" and they still
have a chance to go to Pasadena on New Year's Day.
The hopes for a Boilermaker ,victory center around the offense, with junior
signal-caller Herrmann the key factor. Herrmann completed 21 of 38 passes last
week for 236 yards and two scores in Purdue's 20-14 victory over the Iowa
Hawkeyes.
Herrmann's favorite targets have been tight end Dave Young, who has hauled
in 34 Herrmann aerials, and split ends Ray Smith (26 receptions), who won't play
Saturday because of a pulled hamstring, and Bart Burrell, who's grabbed 24
tosses.
Purdue's running back corps are battered, but they aren't out. Fullbacks John
Macon and Mike Augustyniak are doubtful because of knee injuries, and freshman
tailbck Jimmy Smith left the team last week for personal reasons.
Reserve Ben McCall played extremely well last week against Iowa, gaining 96
yards on 14 carries and caught eight Herrmann tosses for 95 yards, and was run-
ner-up in the Big Ten's offensive player of the week. Sophomore tailback Wally
Jones is the Boilermakers' leading rusher, having rushed for 723 yards on 167
carries; he has a sprained ankle and is questionable for this week's contest.
The defense is hurting as well. Linebacker Kevin Motts and safety Tim Seneff
are unlikely for this week's game. Linebackers Tom Kingsbury and Keena Turner
along with all Big Ten middle guard Tom Loushin head up the stingy Purdue
,defense, giving up only 17 points per game in loop play.
Purdue mentor Jim Young commenting on the injury situation said, "We're as
banged up and depleted in the three years I've been here (at Purdue). I don't want
"td belabbr this point, though."
Young might not belabor the point, but he should worry,.as two players are out
:for sure while six others remain questionable for Purdue.
"Now is when the character shows," said Young.

Free
"Ski M
SKI*5cH
Ski
E " cabs
Or N .& Exhi
HU Ball
" Balla
November 9th l1th;llth
Friday, 10am to 10pm '
Saturday, 10am to 9pm
Sunday, 12pm to 6pm

Refreshments
Movies
ot Dogs
Representatives
aret of Fashion
iibition ;kung
oon Sli Show
oon Tether Rides
Weatur PemnUng

1 _.. _

3

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r

1

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LOOK: IT'S NATIONAL LAMPOON'S
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BIG SIZES 46 TO 56
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Open Mon., Tues., Fri. - 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Tues., Wed., Sat. - 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

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