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November 04, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE RUDOLF STEINER INSTITUTE OF THE GREAT LAKES AREA and
THE RUDOLF STEINER SCHOOL ASSOCIATION OF ANN ARBOR
Present a Lecture on
How CAN I BEST EDUMTE MY CHILD
TO MEET LIFE IN THE 21st CENTURY?
by HENRY BARNES, Educator,
Chairman of the Anthroposophical Society in America
Thursday, November 8, 1979 at 8 p.m., at the
Rudolf Steiner House, 1923 Geddes Avenue, Ann Arbor
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED NO ADMISSION CHARGE
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5-4000 p.m.
3050 FRIEZE BLDG.
EARLY ATTEMPTS IN ISRAELI
ARTISTIC EXPRESSION
LECTURE AND SLIDES:
TZIPI WEITZMAN
M.F.A. Hebrew University
Sponsored by:'
MODERN HEBREW DIVISION
DEPT. OF NEAR EASTERN STUDIES
and JUDAIC STUDIES PROGRAM

Page 2-Sunday, November 4, 1979-The Michigan Daily
LSA-SG to consider

fund renque.
By CHARLES THOMSON
On Nov. 14, student organizations will
have their first opportunity of the
school year to request funds from the
largest school and college government
on campus - the LSA-SG Executive
Council.
The council voted last week to hear
the first requests for money at its
November 14 meeting.
IN PAST YEARS, LSA-SG made
allocations to student organizations
earlier in the year. At this late date in
the semester, the government usually
has "tons" of requests for money,s aid
council member Dan Solomon.
The reason for the delay, according to
President Bob. Stechuk, was the low
number of people serving on the council
prior to the appointment of four new
members on Oct. 17.
In an interview last night, however,
Stechuk said he thought the council
voted to initiate the hearings because
the situation had changed with the new
appointments. "I think we have the
resources to do it (make the
allocations) now," he said.

sts

Nov. 14

0 Free Refreshments
Ski Movies
SKI* 50 Hot Dogs
0Ski Representatives
OPEN 0Cabaret of Fashion
& Exhibition Skiing
IiBalloon Slide Show
* Balloon Tether Rides
Weelur Pftffnn
November 9f1Ot 11th
Friday, 10am to 10pm "
Saturday, l2am to 9pm
Sunday, 12pm to 6pm

Before the appointment of the four
new members, Stechuk said he was
"uncomfortable" having only eight
people voting on fund requests. Stechuk
insisted at that time, however, that he
was not questioning the legitimacy of
the LSA-SG council in the matter.
"Legitimacy comes about by being ac-
tive in things. I think we're legitimate,"
he said.
Stechuk also said he felt that
allocations to student organizations
were important and "needed." Stechuk
added that handling allocations on
November 14, five days before the LSA-
SG Executive Council elections, would
provide a "transitional step" for the
council because, Stechuk said, "it is
likely that people who are on the council
now will continue (after the election)."
Although it is not known which
student organizations will apply for
funds at the Nov. 14 meeting, Stechuk
said last night that he had been contac-
ted by "about a dozen" groups in-
terested in the allocations.
THE NOVEMBER 14 meeting will be
very important because student
organizations have had difficulty get-
ting funds this year, according to LSA-
SG Vice-President Kathy Friedman.
"Obviously, some organizations that
need money haven't been getting it,"
said Friedman, explaining that a cut in
the level of external allocations of the
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA) has
sharply reduced available money. "I
don't think allocations are our sole fun-
ction, but in lieu of the way MSA is han-
ding out their funds, I think they are ex-
tremely important," Friedman added.
MSA, which gave organizations more
than $40,000 last year, has budgeted
$24,000 for student groups this year.
Brad Canale, MSA treasurer, said he
expects the $24,000 level to continue
next year.

mee ting on Val
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope
John Paul II opens an extraor-
dinary meeting of cardinals on
controversial church issues Mon-
day and is expected to give them
a peek at the Vatican's secret
financial balance sheets.'
The four-day session, un-
precedented in modern church
history, will examine the work of
the bureaucracy of the office of
the Pope and the role and
operations of the Roman Catholic
Church in today's world, Vatican
sources say.
Other than a brief announ-
cement that the cardinals would
meet for an "examination of
current issues," the Vatican has
kept details of the meeting
secret. But each cardinal was
mailed an agenda setting out the
points for discussion in general
terms. Some observers believe
the pontiff has set the stage for a
potentially explosive debate, par-
ticularly over the Vatican's
finances.
CARDINAL EGIDIO Vagnozzi,
who heads the Prefecture for.
Economic Affairs, said last year

titan- budget
that because of rising personnel
costs the Vatican faces a 1981
budget deficit of $38 million, and
Vatican employees have recently
been pressing for a raise.
On the four-day agenda, accor-
ding to the sources, is a speech by
Cardinal Agostino Casaroli, the
Vatican's secretary of state, on
the Vatican's Curia, or central
administration. The sources said
this may include a suggestion of
changes, incluling a possible re-
organization to bring in more
non-Italians.
Not since the 16th century has a
pope called in his cardinals for
such a meeting, according to
Vatican historians. Sources say a
number of cardinals had sought
the session to give the "princes of
the church" a'greater voice in the
running of the Vatican.
As if to underline the importan-
ce of the meeting, the pope in-
vited all 129 cardinals - in-
cluding those over 80, who were
excluded by church law from at-
tending the two papal-election
conclaves following the deaths of
Popes Paul VI and John Paul I
last year.

Pope, cardinals to hold

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For central location it's best.
Its menu is wide for "the guest."
*So for lunch come on down,
Or when "out-on-the-town,"
And enjoy a great meal with the rest.
chlgan
Next to Hill Auditorium
Located in the heart of the campus.
it is the heart of the campus.

CAFETERIA HOURS;
11:30-1:15
5:00-7:15
SNACK BAR
7:15-4:00

Law school students
protest X-rated film

Send your League Limerick to:
Manager. Michigan League
227 South Ingalls
You will receive 2 free dinner
tickets if your limerick is used in
one of our ads.

(Continued from Page 1)'
disheartening that this film is being
shown by a law students'
organization," the leaflets said.
"The Law School should have a
commitment to furthering justice for
all groups in this society, rather than
furthering the dehumanization
process."
Although Gargoyle Film Society
began about five years ago under the
auspices of the Law School, it is now
economically self-sufficient.
Joel Russman, chairman of the
society said, "We're not showing
movies specifically for Gargoyle Films,
we're showing them for the student
body."
RUSSMAN SAID one reason
Gargoyle showed the film was because
more people tend to go to X-rated films
and "It's a good way to make money."
When Gargoyle showed the movie last
November they made more money in
one night than they made in six of their
other shows combined, according to
Russman.
The plot of "Misty Beethoveen"
revolves around a young American
woman in Paris who has been recruited
by an older man to become the dilettan-
te of that city's sexual scene. By the end
of the movie, she becomes the man's
master. Russman described the film as
"similar to 'My Fair Lady'," but with a
twist. There are no rape scenes or other
acts of violence in the movie.
Most of the protesters said they had
not seen the film.
SEVERAL GROUPS of people for-
med outside on State Street, arguing
their views on pornography. Third year
law student Kathi Machle argued that
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
VolumeLXXXX, No.52
Sunday, November 4, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Ma nard Street; Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER:- Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

"pornography is an exploitation of
women," and many of the protesters
said pornography incites violent acts
toward womn. Engineering senior'
Larrie Ferreiro said, "There is no cor-'
roborative evidence that pornography
contributes to violence toward
women."
Machle said, "People are going to'
start thinking,. about it (por-
nography) . . ." as a result of the
protest, 'and that's getting at the cause
of sexism and degradation in
America."
Although X-rated movies are protec-
ted by the First Amendment of the Con-
stitution, the women organizing this ef-
fort felt that protesting the Gargoyle
showing would be a useful educational
tool. Sherry Estes, a law student and
member of Feminist Legal Services',
said, "I don't think we'll turn a lot of
people away, but we will make people
aware of the issue."
THE BAND OF protesters appeared
to have little effect on the some 200
patrons who filed into -the film's 8:15
showing. "I think they take it a little too
seriously - it's just entertainment. It
wasn't meant to have any deep
sociological import," said one Univer-
sity sophomore.
Another moviegoer said he felt there
was nothing wrong -with Gargoyle
showing the film. "People are getting
paid well to be in the movie and people
are paying to see it," he said.
"I FIND IT frightening that law
students are trying to stop the free ex-
pression of other people," Russman
said.

TEACHERS WANTED!

a a-
~~ .

Daily Official Bulletin

MONDAYNovember 5,1979

POSITIONS AVAILABLE THIS
FALL AND SPRING FOR COL-
LEGE SENIORS WITH BACHE-
LORS OR GRADUATE DE-
GREE IN MATH, PHYSICS,
CHEMISTRY OR ENGINEER-
IG (U.S. CITIZENSHIP UNDER
THE AGE OF 29)

Daily Calendar:
Physics/Astronomy: E. Bloom, SLAC, "New
Results from the Crystal Ball," (nc Mass and Wid,
th?) 2038Randall, 4 p.m.
Philosophy: Michael Friedman, U-Pennsylvania,
"Theoretical Explanation," Lec. Rm. 2 MLB, 4p.m.
Law School: Francis A. Allen, "The Decline of the
Rehabilitative Ideal: Penal Policy and Public Pur-
pose," Lec. I, "The Rehabilitative Ideal and the
Decline of Public Purpose," 100 Hutchins, 4 p.m.
CICE/Aero Space Ebg/Math: Angelo Miele, Rice,
"Algorithms and Transformation Techniques for Op
timal Control Problems: 1500E. Eng., 4 p.m.

GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES AT THE NAVY
NUCLEAR POWER SCHOOL IN ORLANDO, FL.
TEACHING EXPERIENCE NOT REQUIRED
NO FAMILY SEPARATION

Announcing:
LSA Student Government
FALL ELECTIONS
Nov. 19th and 20th

Sign Up for an
Interview at:
Placeennt Ofifea

r 410 -

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