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November 02, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-02

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 2, 1979-Page 3

CITIZEN'S PROPOSALS DISCUSSED

A2 board debates

By MARIANNE EGRI
The Ann Arbor School Board took
another step towards the formation of a
desegregation plan Wednesday night
when it began debate on parts of six
alternative proposals submitted by a
citizens' advisory committee.
The proposals from the committee,
which was; formed last November,
range from calling for a total
reorganization of elementary schools
and grades to calling for no action.
Other suggestions include organizing
after-school and summer activities
which would promote integration,
proposals for a minimum of busing, and
one for the formation of "magnet"
schools, which would set up special
programs, drawing students from all
over the district.
THE BOARD is currently engaged in
an effort to combine parts of the six
.plans into a single desegregation policy
to improve racial imbalance and in-
crease educational opportunities in the
rdistrict's schools.
The formation of a policy was made
necessary when the Michigan Depar-
tment of Education notified the Ann
Arbor school district in June 1978 that it
did not meet state racial balance

guidelines in six of its 26 elementary
schools.
The state's guidelines specify that the
percentage of student enrollment in any
individual racial group in a school can-
not be greater than 15 per cent above or
below the student percentage for that
racial group in the district as a whole.
SCHOOL BOARD President Kathleen
Dannemiller stressed the need for ac-
tion on the proposals.
"I particdlarly want to settle this,"
she said, "not evasively and not so we
end up in court."
Dannemiller said the board hopes to
adopt a plan, expected to contain
elements of the six citizen committee
proposals, by next June.
SOME BOARD members argued that
adopting the state guidelines would not
necessarily lead to increased
educational opportunities.
"At the moment I would not support
moving to state guidelines because it
would be purely counting numbers
based on skin color," said board mem-
ber John Heald. "We need educational
rationale for that."
However, Board Vice-President
Joseph Vaughn advocated moving
toward the state guidelines with

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desegregation
erate speed.
RD MEMBERS also expressed schools, such as as school for arts and
rn with how boundaries could be music.
;ed with the least amount of Some members, however, said they
borhood disruption possible. were concerned with the ccst of the
member Lana Pollack urged a magnet schools.
w of school boundaries, and Dan- "It looks like it would be expensive,"
ler suggest use of the board's new said Pollack. "We have to look at the
uter system to help determine costs and the benefits."
tative boundary changes. IN OTHER action, Superintendent
ny board members expressed Harry Howard presented the first draft
rn with preserving the concept of of a citizen input plan on the
eighborhood school during the desegregation process. Consisting of
sion on busing as a means to en- several committee levels, the plan
he racial imbalance. would form a racial balance steering
luntary busing would "add to committee at the local school level.
on and disassociation of those we Three members from each local school
o draw into the community," said level committee would feed into a
member Patti Cerny. "cluster" level steering committee.
vNEMILLER and Pollack poin- There would be six clusters, one for
ut the need to not simply bus each intermediate school, and one for
ers of one racial group. Dan- the high schools.
er also said that "if all else falls Each cluster committee would
" she would support rerouting nominate two people to serve on a
its who are already being bused, district level steering committee which
hat would cause the minimum of would have direct access to the board
tion. and administration. Other community
t members expressed interest in groups would also have access to the
ing one of the plans containing input process through the district
sals for "magnet" schools. These steering committee.
consist of setting up various The board will review further the
tonal programs at different proposed plan at itsNov. 14 meeting.

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'riihbedand

ICSGC TO DRAFT POSITION PAPER
Wan more students on boards

By TOM MIRGA
The Inter-College Student Gover-
nment Coalition (ICSGC), a group of
student government leaders and
representatives, laid down tentative
'plans last night to issue a position paper
,calling for increased student par-
ticipation on college and departmental
decision-making boards.
Marc Breakstone, Michigan Student
Assembly (MSA) academic affairs co-
ordinator, and ICSGC founder,
suggested that the body specifically
call for increased student participation
as voting members on college and
department executive committees.
Voting on these boards, Breakstone ex-
plained after the meeting, would have
influence in decisions o budgets,
curriculum development faculty
hiring, promotion and tenure.
ICSGC WAS formed last month in
hopes of bringing more student input in-
to decisions of University-wide impor-
tance. Its membership is open to the

presidents and other representatives of
all student governments on campus,
who were invited by Breakstone to join
the coalition.
Representatives from the Business
School and the School of Public Health,
however, expressed concern about the
qualification of students in their depar-
tments to speak on tenure or promotion
issues. Both departments offer two-
year degree programs, Public Health
representative Jim Murphy said, and
students in his department currently
feel comfortable about their views
being taken into consideration by the
administration.
ICSGC also discussed a number of
additional issues of concern to students,
including the development of effective
course and instructor evaluation, the
declining quality and increasing cost of
educationsand the introduction of stan-
dardized grievance procedures for
students. These issues could be ad-
dressed in future ICSGC position
papers, Breakstone said.

THE MSA member conceded the
issues ICSGC has decided to tackle
have been taken on by students in the
past. "But we are unique in that we
truly represent the students," he said,
"and not simply a group of ten or fifteen
students the-administration can choose
to look right through."
Mark Garman of the School of
Education added it was clear that in-
creased student input into decision
making was a main concern of the body
and ICSGC had the potential for
changing the current state of affairs.
"We've got unification," he said,
"credibility and a wealth of things to
build on."
"Tenure and promotions are related
in that similar criteria are used to
judge faculty members," Garman con-
tinued. "It's important that we work to
get students onto executiye commit-
tees, even if they aren't granted a vote.
At least we can get our foot in the door
of the decision making process."
Tied into the promotion and tenure
issue, Breakstone said, was the issue of
effective student course and instructor
evaluations. "If we can establish a
formalized structure for all schools and
colleges," he said, "we can increase
student input into these decisions."
ICSGC members indicated that, at
present, utilization of the forms com-

monly passed out to students at the end
of semesters differs between depar-
tments. Law School representative
Buck Norlay said his school made ex-
tensive use of the evaluations when
reviewing tenure and promotion cases
but Nursing representative Rosa Ohno
said she wasn't sure how much weight
administrators in her department gave
them.
"The word on professors usually gets
around by word of mouth," Ohno said,
"but a student rarely knows what
professor he or she will have prior to
the first class meeting. The school is
very muchagainsttdisclosing
evaluations because IL think they're
afraid of freezing out the least liked in-
structors."
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A

FILMS
Gargoyle Films-Misty Beethoven, 6:30, 8:15, 10 p.m., 100 Hutchins
Hall.
Cinema Guild-The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, 7, 9:15 p.r., Old
Arch. Aud.
Mediatrics Films--Thunderball, 7, 11:15 p.m., From Russia with Love,
9:05 p.m. only, Nat. Sci. Aud.
Alternative Action-Adam's Rib, 7, 9p.m., MLB Aud. 4.
Ann Arbor Film Coop-Vintage Animation, The Early Works, 7 p.m.
only, The Animation of Max Fleisher, 8:40 p.m. only, Animation By Suzan
Pitt, 10:20 only, MLB Aud. 3.
MEETINGS
Division of Research and Development and Administration, NASA
Research Opportunity informal meeting with James Lawson, Director of
NASA's office of University affairs, 3:15 p.m., Regents Room (first floor of
Administration Building).
PERFORMANCES
Amaizin' Blues-in joint concert with the Wisconsin Singers, 8 p.m.,
Power Center.
Music School-University Chamber Orchestra, Paul Makanowitzky,
conductor, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Theatre and Drama-Showcase Production, The Lion and the Jewel, 8
p.m., Trueblood Theatre.
Musical School-Faculty Harpsichord/flute recital, Edward Parmen-
tier, harpsichordist, Michael Lynn, flutist, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Oasis-Teresa Trull in concert, Julie Homi, accompanist, 8:30 p.m.,
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Ark-Norman and Nancy Blake, flatpick guitar, mandolin, cello accom-
paniment, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Canterbury Loft-The Measures Taken by Bertolt Brecht, performed by
the Radical Arts Troupe, 8 p.m., 332 S. State St.
Jean and Lee Schilling, Appalachian music, Ecumenical Campus Center
annual International Dinner, 6:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church.
SPEAKERS
Engineering Humanities-Richard Falk, Leo Marx, open discussion, 10
a.m.; Rackham Conference Room.
Arthur Branden, Reflections on Michigan, 10:30 a.m., Regents room,
Administration Bldg.
South/S.E. Asian Studies-Robert Snow, Multi-Nationals in Southeast
Asia, noon, Lane Hall Commons.
South/S.E. Asian Studies-Robert Snow, American Involvement in Ex-
port Oriented Industrialization in the Philippines, 3 to 5 p.m., 48 Lane Hall.
Center for Chinese Studies-Michael Oksenberg, U.S.-China Relations, 4
p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Art Museum-Joel Isaacson, Independents, Realists, and Im-
pressionists, The Impressionist Movement from 1878 to 1882, 8 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
The Linguistic Nature of Russian Humor, Professor Victor Raskin from
Purdue University, 12 noon, Brown Bag, MLB Lecture Room 1.
MISCELLANEOUS
Pendleton Arts Center-Cambridge House Happy Hour, 3 p.m., second
floor Michigan Union.
Hockey-Michigan vs. Minnesota, 7:30 p.m., Yost Arena.

THE
Professional
Theatre Program
PRESENTS...

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COMPANY
ON TOUR FOR THE
JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER

Power Center
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by GEORGE ABBOTT Directed by
and PHILIP DUNNING GERALD GUTIERREZ
Nov 9 at8
ELIZABTiol
} by PAUL FOSTER
Directed by
L LVIU CIULEI
Nov 10Uationly
THE bJOHN WEBSTER
Directed by
MICHAEL KAHN
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