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October 27, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-27

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Page 2 Saturday, October 27, 1979--The MichiganDaily
Amphibian facility may croak as
NIH cuts off research funding

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
For the past 15 years, only the
scalpels of University researchers
threatened the happy existence of frogs
living at the University of Michigan
Amphibian Facility located on S. Four-
th Street.
But now the security of frogs,
polywogs, salamanders, and resear-
chers alike is in jeopardy.
THE NATIONAL Institute of Health
(NIH) recently discontinued funding
that has supported the facility since its
inception in 1964. According to George
Nace, amphibian laboratory direcotr,
the Institute was forced to rechannel
funds partly due to the institute's shor-
tage of Rhesus monkeys used to
ntaiufacture polio vaccine.
*Nace explained that because India is
no longer sending the Institute the
nionkeys, it has to spend additional
funds to breed their own. The institute
has also had other problems with a
trckers' strike which caused the
department to lose more money and
withdraw the facility's grant.
Nace said the facility will continue to
operate because it has enough money
set aside to keep going for about
another half a year. Meanwhile, the
organization is looking for donations
from any source, be it federal, state,
local or a private beneficiary.
"STAFF MEMBERS affection-
ately dubbed the facility,
" .RO.A.K."-(Center for Research

of Amphibian Kinships). At the center,.
individual histories of frog generations
are carefully recorded and studied.
Nace said frogs are vital in all areas of
research because their muscular and
nervous systems are similar to those of
humans.
Nace explained that frogs have an
added advantage of being "ectother-
mic," which allows a frog to adjust its
body temperature to the outside en-
vironment. "This enables us to remove
an individual nerve that can live on its
own for hours," he said.
Frogs have been used to study drug
effects, infectious and neural diseases,
developmental defects, regeneration
and tumors. Facility- Colony Coor--
dinator Christian Richards said
through genetic and developmental
research at the center, the sex of frogs
has been manipulated and offspring
have been produced without a father.
"It's working even better than we ex-
pected," she said. "We had thousands
more tadpoles to find extra room for."
PRIOR TO C.R.O.A.K., wild frogs
were shipped to the University labs
directly from frog collectors. Nace said.
the commercial frogs came packed
tightly in boxes and often arrived star-
ved, diseased, dead, or mangled. Nace
said he found these conditions "in-
tolerable in the context of mid-
twentieth century biology," and then
started designing a breeding facility
that would provide frogs with both

aquatic and terrestial environment
and live food.
The job wasn't easy. "We worked fo
a long time trying to make a containe
which duplicates.what a frog needs it
nature. At first we ended up with
nothing but a mudhole," he confessed.
Today enamel pans and plastic bot
tles house the 10,000 tadpoles that hatch
daily. Adult frogs live in container
with simulated summer environmen
or hibernate in tubs of deep water in a
area kept at 40.
FROG FEEDING behavior i
another topic of study and the facility
breeds crickets, birds, flies, an
mosquitos to balance Nace's amphibia
environment. "We used to feed th
frogs flies, earthworms, wax moths
and sow bugs until we found they (th
frogs) didn't grow well," Nace said.
Nace said he and his staff are now
working to trick frogs into acceptin
more economical, non-living food wic
can be nutritionally controlled. Anothe
project goal is to control the light, tem
perature, and dietary conditions tha
stimulate reproductive behavior of a
individual frog.
These projects may have to be aban
doned, however, if the facility does no
receive more funds. Nace said staf
members are setting up local an
national committees to work on th
problem. "If another federal sourc
doesn't volunteer its support, we'll nee
help," he added.

s
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-
h
"s
it
n
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r
I-
it
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PERCHED ON THE EDGE of a budget crisis, this fellow and thousands of other slimy creatures may be out of a job
unless the University Amphibian Facility finds enough money to continue research.
Korean president assassinated

Church Worship Services

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
109 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00a.m
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
T'uesday's 4:00 p.m.-Course, "The
American Evangelical Heritage."
* * *
NEWPORT FELLOWSHIP
(Free Methodist Church)
1951 Newport Road-465-6100
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship--11:00a.m.
(Nursery and Children's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
'obert Henning, Pastor. 663-9526
ClURC(I OF SCIENTOLOGY
Hluron Valley Mission
809 Henrv St.
f;68-6113
Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
I)RID OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
_81 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.-Choir Prac-
ice.
* * *
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928
* * *
NT. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(' tholi )
:l11 Thompson--663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Saturday--7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.. 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass--9:30 a.m. at
1 ursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Rite of Reconciliation -- 4 p.m.--
5 p.m. on Friday only: any other time
by appointment.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.-
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ave.-
Fellowship Supported by the
Christian Reformed Church
cIaw Libolt
Service 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.-
Rev. Peter Ipema-Reformation Day'
Service.
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
727 Miller Rd.
Sunday School-10 am.
Morning Worship-li a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Thomas Loper, 663-7306.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH'
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9: 30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Iluron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Mike Pennanen, Shirley Polakowski
Sunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
ing. Meal at 5:30.
Sunday -6:15-Worship Fellowship.

CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
AT ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish.
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship.
AT CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. State St.
6:00 p.m.-Sunday Evening Medi-
tation. * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
a.m.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
CIURCH: SBC
2580 Packard Road
971-0773 *
Michael Clingenpeel, Ph.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:45, Sunday School; 11:00,
Morning Worship.
Student Transportation call 662-6253
or 764-5240.
6:00 p.m.-Student supper; 7 p.m.-
Worship.
Wednesday, 6 p.m.-Dinner and
Church family activities.
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CH URCH
502 E. Huron St. (between State &
Division)-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Ser-
mon: "Power Management."
. 11:00 a.m.-College Class-led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop.
5:30 p.m.-Sunday Family Night Sup-
pers, Fellowship Hall. Students Wel-
coIne As Our Guests.
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.-Campus
Discussion Group-led by Margi
Stuber, M.D., in the Campus Center
Lounge.

(Continued from Page 1
through Seoul, jarred awake at 4 a.m.
by the startling broadcast of Choi's ap-
pointment.
Choi was named acting president by
an extraordinary session of Park's
cabinet that convened after the
shootout in the KCIA headquarters
about 500 yards from the presidential
mansion.
Kim Jae-kyu, as head of the KCIA,
was one of the key figures in Park's
authoritarian government. A former
army lieutenant general and a
classmate of Park at the Korean
military academy,he" wasnamed by
the president to head the KCIA in 1976.
PARK'S WIFE was killed by a gun-
man on Aug. 15, 1974, who fired several
shots at the president as he was making
a speech. Park was not hit but his 48-
year-old wife, standing nearby, was
fatally wounded. The killer, a Korean
resident of Japan who the prosecution
claimed was a North Korean agent, was
tried and executed.
Park had been under mounting
pressure recently, even from his own
ruling party, after the resignations of
all opposition legislators in the National
Assembly and weekend riots in two
southern cities.\
Before the'offioial nnouncementrof.
Park's death was made, army units
deployed around key government
buildings and public facilities and a
general was rIxmed -martial law com-
mander. He immediately imposed cen-
sorship and a curfew, banned all public
assemblies and ordered universities
and colleges closed "pending further
O' Broadway's Most Honored Play '
of the Season
Winner of Four Tony Awards

notice."
MARTIAL LAW was declared
throughout the peninsular country, with
the exception of the resort -island of
Cheju.
Commercial radio stations suspended
regular programs to carry announ-
cements of Park's death and play
solemn music.
Park had attended the dedication of a
dam near Taejon, 100 miles south of the
capital of Seoul, Friday. He returned to
the presidential mansion by helicopter
and then left the mansion for his dinner
at the KCIA headquarters.
THE CARTER administration
quickly issued a statement declaring
the United States "will react
strongly.. . to any external attempt to
exploit the situation in the Republic of
Korea." This was seen as a warning to
North Korea.
Park's government frequently was
accused of human rights violations, and
he had barred all criticism of his
government, saying South Korea could
not afford divisions because of the
threat of attacks by Communist North
Korea.
Carter had raised the issue of human
rights violations with Park when he,.
"= isitMtl3outh Korea iiY Jure.
CARTER ASSURED acting
President Choi Kyu-hah last night that
the United States will stand firmly,
behind its treaty commitments to South
Korea following the shooting death of
President Park.
Carter said he was shocked and sad-
dened by the death, and praised Park
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 45
Saturday, October 27, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Streets Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
OPEN TONIGHT
till 1 am
BILLIARDS
BOWLING
PINBALL
AT THE UNION

as "a firm friend of America, a staunch
ally, and an able leader."
"In particular, his role in Korea's
remarkable economic development will
not be forgotten," the message released
by the White House said.
"LET ME assure you as you assume.
your duties as acting president that the;
United States government will continue
to stand firmly behind its treaty com-
mitments to the Republic of Korea,','
Carter said.
Park's government drew praise for
its strong economic development and
condemnation because of its harsh'
treatment of critics.
There was speculation that Choi, a 60-,
year-old former diplomat, will be little
more than a caretaker leader as the-
various political factions emerge.
THE CONSTITUTION provides for'
the prime, minister to become acting
president if the president is unable to
perform his duties and for the electoral'
college to choose a new president within
three months.
Members of the electoral college,
called the National Conference for
Unification, were elected by popular
vote in May 1978, and all were firm
Park supporters.
Daily Official Bulletin.
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 764-7460
SATURDAY. OCTOBER 27,1979
The William L. Patterson Foundation offers three
grants in amounts rangng from $500 to $1000. Open to
persons or organizations engaged in projects,
research or activity pertinent to todays struggle
against racism, oppression and exploitation.
The University of Detroit is sponsoring a'
Metropolitan Detroit careers Convention on Wed.
The Annual Fellowship Competition of the prin
ting, publishing, and packaging industry is open in
the following areas of study: Physics, chemistry,
business, engineering, industrial education and
mathematics. Primary interests are fields which,
contribute to the printing and publishing industry,;as
well as related industries, i.e., paper, ink, etc.
Stipend to $1,000.
The 11th Annual Philip Morris Marketing/Com-
munications Competition is open to graduate and un-
dergraduate students. A first place award of $2,000, a
second place award of $1,000 and a third place award
will be given to the winning teams in both the grad-
uate and undergraduate categories.
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer T. Olin Fellowships are
available for women at Washington University .
Awards up to $4,500 for the academic year.
1979 MBA Admission Forums: Chicago, November
30-Dec. 1, Holiday Inn Mart Plaza, 350 N. Orleans
Street. San Francisco, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, Holiday Inl >
Golden Gateway, 1500 van Ness Ave.
THE LADY DAVIS FELLOWSHIP TRUST, P.O.
Box 1255, Jerusalem, Israel. Graduate or Post-
Doctoral Fellowships available for study, Research
or Teaching at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
& The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.
Haifa.
Check the D.O.B. file at Career Planning &
Placement for detailed information on the above
fellowships and awards.

TONIGHT & SUNDAY
SAT. at 8pm & SUN. at 2pm & 8pm
POWER CENTER
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Tickets Availble at Power Center
box office.
Today 1pm-5pm and 6pm-8pm
Sunday 12 noon-5pm and 6pm-8pm

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

7 Solutions To Your Problem
Use these numbers to call
the Michigan Daily

This question is the opening words of the 2nd Psalm. It is
asked and answered by God Almighty. The heathen are
revealed as those who resist and seek to get rid of God's L aw,
and His Ten Commandments. Not only do the heathen rage,
resist, and seek to get rid of Gods Law, but also they resist
and seek to get rid of GodsAnointed, TheLord Jesus Christ,
who came from heaven to deliver man from his "estate of sin
and misery." He came down and was born of The Virgin
Mary, and so became God and man. The God-man
substituted Himself for fallen man and kept Gods Com-
mandments perfectly in his stead. Then, He again
substituted for fallen man and took upon Himself the wrath
and curse of Gods judgment upon rebellion and
lanaanra n - .. u .n , inw TnThe n s... A f*ertr,.

in recent years the Protestant Nations have forsaken
God's Commandment regarding The Sabbath Day. Even
before The Bible records God's Commandment to Adam
forbidding the eating of "the tree of knowledge of good and
evil," there is the implication of the 4th Commandment -
"Remember The Sabbath Day to keep it holy..." - given at
Mt. Sinai much later in time. This implication appears in the
2nd chapter of Genesis, verses 2 and 3: "And God blessed
the seventh day, and sanctified It because that in ItHe rested
from all His work which God created and made." God
sanctified it! What do you do with it - as you please? Jesus
Christ said: "The Son of Man is Lord of The Sabbath Day...
The Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the Sab-
hath." Was It made for man to flout and Drofane by working,

BILLING....
CIRCULATION.
CLASSIFIED . . .
DISPLAY.......
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* " "
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* "0".

764-0550
764-0558
764-0557
764-0554
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