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October 26, 1979 - Image 16

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-26

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Page 16-Friday, October 26,1979-The Michigan Daily.

ARE TITLE HOPES FOR REAL?

Youthful Hoosiers ripe for upset

,.
4

By MARTHA CRALL
Mighty Michigan becomes even
mightier, it seems, on Homecoming
Day. The Wolverines have won their
last eleven homecoming games.
Ironically, the last Michigan
homecoming defeat came at the hands
of the Indiana Hoosiers in 1967.
However, the irony as well as the
tradition. of Wolverine homecoming.
wins will probably be near the bottom
of the list of things on the Hoosiers'
minds come Saturday.
Michigan has that familiar Blue
momentum rolling now, having won its
last five games in a row. They have

their next victims, Indiana, in their
sights this week and with a win, would
virtually eliminate the fading Hoosiers
from the Rose Bowl race. All they have
to do is beat the Hoosiers, which would
give Indiana two Big Ten losses. It
doesn't figure to be quite that easy,
though.
INDIANA IS 5-2 on the season, and 3-1
in Big Ten play. The Hoosiers' first loss
came on Septerber 29, a 17-16 hear-
tbreaker to Colorado. Their only Big
Ten defeat was a crucial one. Ohio
State, with whom Indiana was tied
going into the contest, blew them away,
47-6.

Where graduate education
in management began
The Amos Tuck School of Business Ad-
ministration is the oldest graduate school
of business in the United States. It was
founded at Dartmouth College in 1900
and continues to be a leader in the busi-
ness of educating managers. From its
inception, the Masters Degree has been
the only degree offered by the Tuck
School. This exclusive focus, combined
with its small size, offers a personalized
approach to professional management
education which is distinctive among the
leading business schools. The residential
nature of the program and close student-
faculty interaction furthercenhance the
quality of the learning experience.
Prospective applicants to MBA programs
will consider many aspects of the various
schools in choosing those to which they
will apply. Among them are likely to be
some of the qualities mentioned above as
well as location, teaching methods and
philosophy, the student body, reputation,
and placement. These issues as they re-
late to Tuck will be presented in a short
series appearing in future editions of this
paper. Look for them. And, for further
information about the Tuck program, clip
the form below.
Next edition:A Top Graduate School of
Business in Hanover, New Hampshire!'
Please send a bulletin and application
materials for Tuck School to:
Name (please print)
Address
City
State tip
College Degree Date
Director of Admissions
Amos Tuck School of
Business Administration
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
A representative of Tuck School will be
on campus Tuesday, October 30, 1979.
Schedule an interview with the Career
Panning and Placement, 3200 Student
A tivities Building - 764-7457.

Indiana bounced back last week,
however, with a 30-0 trouncing of Nor-
thwestern. It is on that wave that they
will ride into Michigan Stadium on
Saturday. The shutout of Northwestern,
coupled with their 3-0 shutout of
Wisconsin on October 6, marks the first
time Indiana has accomplished two
shutouts in one season since 1959.
The Hoosier defense has been led this
season by sophomore cornerback Tim
Wilbur. With his interception against
Northwestern his career total advan-
ces to nine, just two shy of the Indiana
record. Marc Longshore, a sophomore
defensive back, is a questionable star-
ter. He suffered a bruised shoulder last
week against Northwestern.
HEALTHY, INDEED, is junior
tailback Mike Harkrader, who rushed
for a season high 146 yards against Nor-

thwestern. Junior quarterback Tim
Clifford must be contained, as well.
Clifford is a 60 per cent passer who is
movjng up in the Indiana record books.
He's currently seventh on the all-time
list and has 1076 passing yards so far in
1979.
As far as tradition goes, Indiana
doesn't have much here in Ann Arbor.
Over the last 50 years, the Hoosiers
have managed only seven wins in 29 at-
tempts. The last time Indiana visited the
Wolverines in 1975, they were sent
home with a 55-7 spanking.
Co'rso, in appraising the Michigan
Machine said, "They have fine person-
nel. We'll have to play good,-solid foot-
ball. That's the only way to beat a team
like Michigan."
GRANTED, THAT particular
statement is a favorite from the college

I 1

STAR

BAR

109 N. Main St.-769-0109
APPEARING TONIGHT:
STEVE NEWHOUSE BAND
"Ann Arbor's Original Honky Tank Dance Bar"

Golden dreams
ex-Blue harrier i

By JOHN FITZPATRICK
Who is Greg Meyer?
If you asked anyone familiar with
track this question, you'd get replies
like, "He's the 3:59 indoor miler,
right?" or, "He set an American road
record for the 25-kilometer run this
year," or "He beat Bill, Rodgers in a
road race in Boston," or, "Didn't he win
the 1978 AAU cross-country champion-
ship?"
Greg Meyer, a 1977 graduate of
Michigan, has done all of these, and
more.
Yet, if a straw poll was taken on
campus, few, if any students, would
admit to knowing this famous ex-
Wolverine. Greg Meyer is a distance
runner, and it is football which is king
at U of M, not running.
Meyer, currently readying to defend
his AAU cross-country title and to gain
a berth on the 1980 U.S. Olympic team,
works in Bill Rodgers' running store in
Boston and trains with the members of
the Greater Boston Track Club. "My
training right now consists of a lot of
distance, but I'll also do one day of in-
tervals, one hill workout, one hard
distance run, and one long run a week,"
said Meyer.
"Bob Sevene, a coach at Boston U.,
helps me out with my training, but I
still talk to, Ron Warhurst once a week.
Sevene is able to gauge my day-te-dayd
condition, but Ron knows me better _
he's coached me for so long, he's better
acquainted with my characteristics."
In a typically self-effacing way,
Meyer credits Warliurst, Michigan
men's cross-country coach, with muc
of his success: "Ron Warhurst has had
a big effect on me. Warhurst made me

the runner I am today. Dan Heikkinen
('79 NCAA steeplechase finalist) 'is a
good example of Warhurst's coaching
ability; when Dan came to Michigan as
a freshman he wasn't very good, yet
Warhurst stuck by him and developed
him into the runner he is now. Ron
Warhurst is every bit as good as any of
the best track coaches in the country;
Michigan isn't a big track school, so he
doesn't get much recognition."
Meyer: Olyi pw goal
Meyer's achievements since his
graduation from Michigan are many:
the 3:59 mile, an American record of
1:14:29 in the Old Kent Bank River Run
of 25 km., (breaking Bill Rodgers' cour-
se record by three minutes), a victory
over Olympic bronze medalist Brendan
Foster of Great Britain in a cross-
country. ,racelast year, and the 1978
national cross-country title, which
Meyer won at Seattle, using a blistering
kick to nip NCAA champion Al Salazar
29:35.9-29:36.5 for the hilly 10,000-meter
course.
Meyer sees this year's AAU meet as a
tough race: "It'll be a dogfight from the
gun. I don't think it'll develop into the

coaches' quote-bag, but Corso is pretty
close to the truth this time. Indian a
must rally their offense to the same-,
heights as they did last week when they..,;
logged 465 yards. Of course, the
Michigan defense isn't as vulnerable as, -
Northwestern's, so the Hoosiers cer,
tainly have their work cut out for them.,.
The Indiana defense must keep the,
Wolverines inside, as well. Ohio State',
outside game shredded the Hoosier
defense, and so will Michigan's if in-.
diana doesn't keep it well contained.
Corso admits that the Hoosiers will do
something to protect against the out-
side game, but at the same time, he.,
realizes that other areas may open. . -
Indiana has everything to gain this,
week, so undoubtedly they'll be going
for broke. All their remaining games -
are with Big Ten rivals, and they can.t*
afford any more conference defeats.
keep
running
wait and kick sort of thing that it did
last year. Al Salazar will be there, and a
lot of other good guys like Herb Lin-
dsay."
In the U.S. Olympic Trials at Eugene,.
Oregon this spring, Meyer will eith.r'
run the steeplechase of 10,000 meter.
"The steeple is my first love, so then-
coaches will, have to do a lot of talking'
to persuade me to concentrate on theK
10,000. My main competition in the
steeple should come from Henry Marsh
of Athletics West and Bill McCullough
of the Santa Monica Track Club, and
there are quite a few others-who are
good competitors. I've beaten a lot of'.
them, though, so I stand a good chan-
ce.
Despite finishing third in this year's'
AAU steeplechase, Meyer considers
that to be his best event. "I wasn't
ready for the AAU's. I hadn't done
nearly enough speed or steeple wo-k',-,
just a lot of distance; I think there's a
lot of room for improvement in the
steeple."
When asked about how he would sum
up his running career to date, Meyer,.
perhaps better at understatement than}
he is at running, responds, "It's been,
fun." After a pause, he adds, "I think
that by running, and doing well at it,,If
proved to myself that I could do
something decent; it gave me a lot of
confidence, not just as an athlete, but as,,
a person.
Greg Meyer is an internationally,.
known track figure, a national chan-
pion, and an amateur athlete. Whereas,.
he would be handsomely paid and pam-
pered if he was a professional sports
figure, as an amateur he must make do
with quietly working in Rodgers' store
in between his twice-daily training-
sessions, as he runs toward the ultimate
goal of a track athlete: to compete if
the Olympic Games.

MIT,-
a a t

1

I

0)

the,(;ourg
5 DAYS

- H

To
impkin
latch

GRIDDEj
PICKS
1. Indiana at MICHIGAN
(Pick score)
2. Michigan St. at Ohio St.
3. Northwestern at Purdue
4. Illinois at Minnesota
5. Iowa at Wisconsin
6. South Carolinoat Notre Dame
7. Princeton at Harvard
8. Navy at Pittsburgh
9. Maryland at Duke
10. N. Carolina St. at Clemson
11. Auburn at Wake Forest
12. Florida St. at LSU
13. Toledo at Miami (.)
14. Central Michigan at Kent St.
15. Oklahoma St. at Kansas
16. Texas at SMU
17. Washington at UCLA
18. Houston at Arkansas
19. San Jose State at Long Beach St.
20. G.K.'s Vermont Saps at DAILY
LIBELS

d
' 4
.} I

,8,t I

a"

The University of Michigan
Committee on Southern Africa
TEACH-IN ON SOUTH AFRICA: CONTINUITY AND CHANGE
October 26 & 27, 1979

OCTOBER 26
School of Education
(corner South & East university)
Whitney
Auditorium

1:30

Panel-"CONTINUITY AND CHANGE
IN SOUTH AFRICA" Professors Vilakazi,
Seidman, Samoff, Wilfred Grenville-
Grey
Lecture-"WHITHER APARTHEID?
SOUTH AFRICA IN BLACK SOUTHERN
AFRICA" Professor Bernard Magubane,
University of Connecticut

Schorling
Auditorium

4:00

I

Al

11

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