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October 24, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-24

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 24, 1979-Page 5

I

Chemical
clean-up
to cost
Hooker Co.
$20 million

LANSING (UPI)-Attorney General Frank Kelley has
called a news conference for today to disclose details of a $20
million-plan clean-up agreement with Hooker Chemical Co.,
settling the biggest anti-pollution suit in state history.
Scheduled to attend the news conference along with
Kelley were state Natural Resources Director Howard Tan-
ner and Donald Baeder, a vice president of Occidental
Petroleum Corp.-Hooker's parent firm.
IN ONE OF THE major environmental controversies of
recent years, Hooker has been charged with responsibility
for the discharge of chemical contaminants into Muskegon
County's White Lake as well as seepage from a dump site
near its plant.
Fish from the lake tentatively have been ruled unsafe for
human consumption as a result of tests indicating toxic
chemical contamination. Questions also have been raised
about the safety of swimming in the lake.
Kelley filed a 40-page lawsuit against the firm in
February. Hints that a settlement was near have been
growing in recent weeks.r

THE AGREEMENT would require Hooker to dismantle a
building where pesticides were manufactured and scrape up
roadside dirt near its Montague plant. The dirt and building
parts would then be placed in a 10-foot-thick, clay-covered
vault.
Inaaddition, Hooker would have to provide fresh water to
Montague families with contaminated wells either by pur-
chasing bottled water or paying to connect them to city water
lines.
The DNR would be barred from further prosecution of
Hooker but private persons and organizations would not be.
bound by that restriction.
DEED RESTRICTIONS would prevent construction of
homes or stores on the site at any future date-a clause in-
spired by the Love Canal incident in New York in which it
was discovered several hundred homes were built on a toxic
waste dump once owned by a Hooker plant.
The proposed agreement has some opponents.
Representatives of a Swartz Creek chemical disposing
firm which handled Hooker wastes have asked for a tem-
porary restraining order blocking the agreement.

ASK THEM WHY

Hitchhikers assault
Ann Arbor motorists

1'
A y

Drawing power
A satellite receiving antenna was installed this morning atop the LSA build-
ing for WUOM use. All National Public Radio affiliates are receiving the
antennas, and by 1980, all public broadcasting programs will be carried via
satellite.
RSG president stays on;
council vacancies remain

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
Ypsilanti Police said yesterday that
a woman who is recovering from stab
wounds at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital is
a prime suspect in two armed robbries
in Ann Arbor Monday night.
Though Ann Arbor Police are han-
dling the case, officials would not
comment on the Ypsilanti police theory
about the woman. Ypsilanti police are
involved in the case because they inter-
viewed the woman when she was ad-
mitted to Beyer Memorial Hospital in
Ypsilanti early yesterday morning.
THE WOMAN, who Ann Arbor Police
Sgt. Walter Lunsford said is in her
twenties, entered the hospital with a
knife wound in her chest and cuts on her
arms. She was later transferred to St.
Joseph Mercy.,
Earlier, Ann Arbor police were
notified of two armed robberies which
Moratorium
is defeated
b advisory
commission
(Continued from Page 1)
is not making a stronger statement on
the future of nuclear power.
"They apparently are not able to say
clearly that either the program is safe
and can go ahead or that- it is not safe
and has to be reformed," said Peter
Franchot, a spokesman for the Union of
Concerned Scientists.
CARTER APPOINTED the pi'esiden-
tial panel last April to probe the
nation's worst commercial nuclear ac-
cident near Harrisburg, Pa., and make
recommendations on safety issues.
According to several commission
sources, the panel will call for a broad
reorganization of the Nuclear
Regulatory - Commission, (NRC),
saying it has not paid adequate atten-
tion to safety matters under its present
structure.
The panel reportedly will suggest the
current five-member panel be replaced
by a single administrator and that
licenses for nuclear plants be subject to
review on a regular basis.
THE NRC currently makes decisions
by a majority vote, and a power plant
now is licensed only once.

Ypsilanti police believe may have been
carried out by the female and a male
accomplice who is still at-large.
The first hold-up occurred at 11 p.m.
Monday when a motorist picked up a
couple hitchhiking at the corner of
Liberty and South Division Streets,
police said. After the woman held a
knife to the driver's throat and deman-
ded money, he stopped his car in the 200
block of South Ingalls Street.
Twenty-five minutes later another
motorist also offered a couple a ride at
the corner of Washtenaw Avenue and
Hill Street. When the car stopped, the
woman held a knife to the driver's
throat and demanded money, Lunsford
said. When she struggled with the
motorist over the knife, the woman was
stabl;ed. The woman's accomplice hit
the driver over the head with a bottle,
police said. The driver was shoved out
of the car and the couple drove away.

Ask Peace Corps volunteers why they travel to Africa, Asia
and Latin America to work with farmers, teachers, and
trades people. Ask VISTA volunteers why they work for a
year organizing poor people in their American neighborhoods.
They'll probably say they want to travel, help people, see
new places and meet different people. Ask someone who's
been there.

PLACEMENT CENTER
OCT. 30 - NOV. 1

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG.
hITA.

Y

COMPUTERS

HEWLETT

,* u
f
.4

l-hP-

INSTRUMENTS
PACKARD

By CHARLES THOMSON
Bob Milbrath, president of 'the
Rackham Student Government (RSG)
last night officially withdrew the
resignation he submitted to the RSG
Executive Council earlier this year.
Milbrath told the Executive Council
that in light of the fact that no one had
applied to replace him in the upcoming
RSG elections, he would stay on as
president. The council unanimously ac-
cepted the withdrawl of Milbrath's
resignation.
A TOTAL OF three persons have ap-
plied for the ten vacancies to be filled in
the October 30 and 31 elections, accor-
ding to Milbrath. One person, Patricia
Carstensen, has definitely applied to
represent Physical Sciences and
Engineering on the council. Two people
have apllied to represent Education,
according to Milbrath and council
member Nancy Tucker. But RSG of-
ficials neither knew the names of those

possible candidates nor confirmed that
they were running.~
By October 22, the filing deadline for
elections, no one had applied for the
position of president, vice president, or
represenative from either Humanities,
Social Sciences; or Biological and
Health Sciences.
The council last night considered ex-
tending the filing deadline for the elec-
tions, but decided against it after coun-
cil member Susan Van Alstyne claimed
that such an extension might damage
the council's credibility.
The council also decided to table until
after the next election an amendement
to the -RSG by-lawys, proposed by
Milbrath, which would have altered the
way in which council members are
elected. The amendment would have
established an assembly of ap-
proximately 120 representatives who
would have been selected from depar-
tments within the Rackham School of
Graduate Studies.

" INVESTS 10% OF SALES IN R&D FOR TECHNICAL
LEADERSHIP AND SUSTAINED HIGH GROWTH
" ENCOURAGES INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTION IN AN
IN FORMAL SMALL-COMPANY, ATMOSPHERE
OFFERS THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND
RESOURCES OF A CAREFULLY MANAGED $2 BILLION
COMPANY
HAS OPENINGS THROUGHOUT THE U.S. FOR BS, MS OR
PhD GRADUATES:
COMPUTER SCIENCE PLACEMENT 24 OCTOBER,1979
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT 26 OCTOBER, 1979
SPRING INTERVIEWS 13-15 FEBRUARY, 1980

1

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©

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