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October 23, 1979 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-23

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Page 12-Tuesday, October 23, 1979-The Michigan Daily

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SWEDISH AUTHOR SPEAKS ON CHINA
China an influential world power

III
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K_ -

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Invites You To
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Soup and
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(Continued from Page 1)
village decided it wanted to improve its
housing conditions and agricultural
production," Myrdal explained. "Since
that time, the people of Liu Lin have
gone from living in caves to stone
houses, as well as cultivated their land,
leveled their fields, built dams, and
dealt with the erosion that's wearing
away their land.
The village has its own government-
funded cooperative medical system,
Myrdal said. This system, is made
possible by the villagers' taking
medical courses, which enables them to
treat various minor illnesses. Major
illnesses are treated at a local hospital.
MYRDAL, WHO ,is on a three-week
tour of the U.S. with his wife, stressed
that education has improved vastly in
the country-side and the wide gap that
once existed between urban and rural
education has closed considerably. Set-
ting up daycare centers in rural
villages has enabled rural children to
start school at the same age as urban
children, Myrdal said.
"These advancements are the result
of much discussion and debate," he
emphasized. "Life is a constant
struggle for the Chinese people and
western people cannot expect changes
Broadway's Most Honored Play"
Winner of Four Tony Awards

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THE
GREAT ESCAPE.*
You dream about it at night...the day you
can close your books, get out of this place and
forget about studying for awhile.
Well, the Great Escape is here... this
weekend, with Greyhound. Escape to the
country pr go see some friends. Just decide
which escape route you want and we'll do
the rest.
We'll get you out of town and away from the
books so you can clear your head. It doesn't cost
much and it'll do you a world of good.
So make the Great Escape this weekend...
with Greyhound.

to occur overnight."
Most people in China understand that
an egalitarian society can never be
achieved because different work
requires different pay, Myrdal added.
"IF ONE FARM worker is weeding
the fields and the other worker is
digging up and hauling rocks from the
field then the latter worker will earn
more money because his job is harder,"
said Myrdal.
China's paucity of wealth has a great
impact on education, Myrdal said.
"Lack of resources and facilities
prevent many young people from at-
tending college," he said."This is a big
problem because many young people
wish to further their education and
can't.
Myrdal explained that once young
people have graduated from high
school they are required to spend two to
three years on a commune. After ser-
ving that term, they can be selected by
their commune to attend college, he
said. However, the number of ap-
plications' far exceeds the number of
available positions.
MYRDAL SAID he supports the
policy of sending city youth to the coun-
try-side because it closes the social gap
between urban and rural youths, and
may permit youths to become familiar
with technological advances.
The Chinese people are looking for-
ward to higher standard of living and
believe that the modernization of the
agricultural and industrial economy is
necessary to achieve a better way of
life, according to Myrdal.
"MOST OF THE Chinese people are
highly motivated," he said. "They
desire particular goods, such as
bicycles and sewing machines, but they
realize it will take a long time to
achieve these goals, both personal and
national."
He also said closer military ties bet-
ween the U.S. and China would help
curb Soviet imperialism. "The Chinese
believe the U.S.S.R. is the most
aggressive super power on the earth
today," exclaimed Myrdal. "To answer
this threat the Chinese are modernizing
their army and defense systems, and
are seeking closer diplomatic ties with
the U.S."
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Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
Swedish author Jaxn Myrdal, renowned China scholar,.spoke Sunday eve-
ning at Schorling Auditorium of the School fo Education in an event spon-
sored by the U.S.-China Peoples Friendship Association.
South Quad develops
darkroom i nfocusl

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By PAULA LASHINSKY
When Larry Shapiro arrived on cam-
pus two years ago, he was eager to
make use of one of the dorm facilities
listed in the University's housing
booklet - a darkroom.
After the photography buff moved in-
to South Quad he discovered that, sure
enough, there was a darkroom waiting
for him. The catch was that none of its
equipment was ready to be used.
SHAPIRO APPROACHED then
South Quad Building Director Max
Smith asking that the film developing
facility be renovated.
The University will provide the
money, he was told, if students do the
.work
Two years, a term of football Satur-
days, and $700 of his own money beyond
dorm funds later, Shapiro has made the
South Quad darkroom the best on cen-
tral campus.
"MY SUMMER earnings and the fact
that my father is a good sport is what is
currently keeping us going," said
Shapiro. "But it really is just a matter

of time until the darkroom is self-
sufficient and my investment will be
returned. "
The South Quad darkroom, which
opened last January, charges a $7.50
lab fee to dorm residents and $10.00 to
outsiders. Photographers are allowed
the use of equipment and chemicals,
but must furnish their own paper.
IN ADDITION to individuals, the Art
Collaborative, a University-run arts
program, holds its lab and class at the
darkroom Shapiro built.
"We try to maintain fairly tight
security, but we also try to leave the
room (open) to students," Shapiro said.,
"We take pride in our facility and hope
that those who use it will too."
Five other dorms provide darkrooms,
but none of them are as well maintained
as the.South Quad facility.
Stockwell tried to muster interest in
photography last year by offering
lessons, but Building Director Ruth Ad-
dis says only one resident expressed
any interest.

_

UNION TERMINAL-116 W. Huron-662-5511
GREYIOIAY
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OCTOBER 26-28
FRI & SAT-om-SUN -2pm &8om
POWER CENTER
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
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Michigan League PHONE: 764-0450.
Hours: Mon-Fri 10-1,& 2-5 pm
Also at all HUDSON'S out ets

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"Gimme a'D*
Gimme an A*
Gimme an . . L . ..Y
Give the MICHIGAN DAILY
that old college try.
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription

Iy
ENGINEERS AND COMPUTER
SCIENCE GRADS:
HERE'S YOUR CHANCE TO
PUT WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED
TO WORK.
YES, as a company we're a leader in fast, exciting
fields...aircraft, missiles, spacecraft, electronics, automa-
tion, and health services. But we also realize that our
leadership depends on how fast our people grow.
SO, our goal is to provide opportunities for future-minded
engineers and computer scientists who want to grow right
along with a leader.
AND, we want to talk to graduating seniors and graduate
students about their goals.
IF, you're ready to get your career off the ground, McDon-
nell Douglas wants to talk to you. Sign up at the-Placement
Office for a personal interview. Here is the date we'll be on
campus:

TUCK SCHOOL
Case vs. Theory
It is generally agreed that the overall
objective of an MBA education is to
prepare students for responsible careers
as managers. However, the question of
which methods a school should use to
achieve this objective continues to
arouse discussion and debate. For some
academicians'and many practitioners,
the answer is to give students a thorough
understanding of current business prac-
tices and a massive exposure to practice
in making management decisions in both
real and simulated environments. For
others, particularly some academicians,
the objective is to cram students full of
skills, techniques, theories, and prin-
ciples. Indeed, much of the discussion
among academicians and practitioners
has taken place in terms of these two
polar views of how a school ought to
prepare people for careers in manage-
ment.
For Tuck, however, the argument of
theory vs.practice involves a false di-
chotomy. The School believes that both
are important and must be a part of a
successful program. Theories, tools, and
principles are vital components of an
MBA curriculum. As change erodes exist-
ing practices and builds up new and
different challenges, nothing is more
practical or relevant than sound theory.
But theory by itself is not enough. The
hallmark of the effective manager is to be
able to apply theory in ways that lead to
sound judgments and decisions.
Next edition: Who Attends Tuck?
Please send a bulletin and application
materials for Tuck School to:
Name (please print)
Address
City
State Zip
College Degree Date

Thursday & Friday,
November 1 and 2

11

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