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October 23, 1979 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-23

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SPOR TS OF THE DAIL Y

,

agic'
By The Associated Press'
LOS ANGELES - Rookie guard
Earvin Johnson, sidelined because of a
sprained right knee, will return to ac-
tion this Friday night when the Lakers
face Kansas City, the National Basket-
ball Association team announced
yesterday.
Johnson was injured in the third
quarter of last Wednesday night's game,
in Seattle and has missed the Lakers'
last two games. The injury was first
believed to be serious enough to keep
the former Michigan State All-
American out of action for six weeks,
but was later diagnosed as only a
sprain.
The Lakers said that Johnson will
practice for the first time since his in-
jury on Tuesday, at the Forum in
suburban Inglewood.
Johnson averaged 20.0 points, 6.7
rebounds and 5.3 assists in the Lakers'
-first t ree games. Los Angeles now has
a 3-2 record.
Los Angeles faces the Utah Jazz at

to return Friday

the ForumTuesday night. In addition to
Johnson, the Lakers will be without
starting forward Spencer Haywood,
who has a hip pointer.
Haywood, who didn't play in the
Lakers' 106-97 victory over Seattle Sun-
day night, is also expected to return to
action Friday night.
O}regon .St. coac'h ra11edel
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Oregon State
University football coach Craig Fertig
was fired yesterday, effective at the
end of the season.
Fertig and Oregon State University
President Robert MacVicar said in a
joint statement that Fertig will be
relieved of coaching duties and will ac-
cept reassignment at his current salary
for the rest of his contract that runs
through the end of 1981.
The duties were not specified.
"Mr. Fertig agreed that he would
assist in all possible ways in the tran-
sition to the new coach who hopefully

will be named before the end of
November," the statement said.
Fertig; former star quarterback at
University of Southern California,
became Oregon State coach in Decem-
ber 1975. His teams have won seven,
lost 33 and tied one.
(;lavborn Itron It appeal
NEW YORK - New England Patriot
defensive back Raymond Clayborn,
fined $2,000 by Commissioner Pete
Rozelle as a result of his altercations
with sports writers, has withdrawn his
request for an appeal, the National
Football League confirmed yesterday.
Clayborn threatened Bruce Lowitt,
an Associated Press sports writer, after
the Patriots' loss to Pittsburgh in the
teams' Monday night season opener.
The following Sunday, after the
Patriots beat the New York Jets 6-3,
Clayborn threatened and poked Boston
Globe sports writer Will McDonough in
the eye, and the two scuffled briefly.
Homecoming
l9?9

SPORi~TS E[rNl Tflq
i GYMNASTICS
KOREAN NATIONAL TEAM. Oct. 28 (men &
women
VOLLEYBALL
at Big Ten Tournament.Oct. 25-26
MEN'S C'ROSS COUNTRY
at Central Collegiate ('ha mpionships, Oct. 27
F"IELDHOCKEY
at Central Michigan. Oct.21
BOWLING GREEN, Oct. 24
NORTHERN MICHIGAN, Oct. 26
WOMEN'S (ROSS ('OUNTRY
at Michigan State Invitational, Oct. 27
FOOTBALL
INDIANA, Oct.K27
hOCKEY
Minnesota-D~uluth, Oct. 26-27

The Michigan Doily-Tuesday, October 23, 1979-Page 11
STEVE'S LUNCH *
We Serve Breakfast All Day *
*
* Try our Famous 3 Egg Omelette *
with your choice of fresh bean sprouts, mushrooms, "
green peppers, onion, ham, bacon, and cheese.
See Us Aso For LunchT& Dinner Menus
STUES.-FRI . 8-7, SAT.-SUN. 9-7
* 1313 S. University 769-2288

i NEFF
IS.
ENOUGH-
By Billy Neff

HELD OVER
By Popular Demand-
-THREE DAYS ONLY
SENIOR PORTRAITS
ARE CONTINUING
THROUGH WEDNESDAY
OCT. 24
CALL 764-0561 FOR
YOUR APPOINTMENT I

Scent of roses .. .
. Bo smells it
Tp HEIR FRAGRANCE IS in the air and Bo Schembechler smells them.
' You know what he smells as well as I do-Blue roses again.
In the Michigan-locker room after the Illinois game, played in Cham-
paign, Bo, as usual, wanted to know the scores of some other games. But he
* broke with tradition and desired to learn the score of the USC game. In ad-
,dition, he asked who would go to the Rose Bowl if Stanford won the remain-
,. der of their games. You see, Stanford had tied USC the previous week.
The answer was given by a Big Ten official, who remarked that USC
* <would to due to a power percentage formula. In short, Bo was curious as to
who his opponent would be in Pasadena.
This repartee is not meant to imply that he has forgotten upcoming op-
ponents, nor neglected the fact that Ohio State is demolishing opponents left
''and right. Instead, Bo seems to have the gut feeling that his Wolverines will
overcome them all and visit his famous New Year's hangout.
I must agree with them wholeheartedly on this matter. No matter how
C' "you look at it, Bo has his team once again right where he wants them.
Sure they lost to Notre Dame, and it was a heartbreaking loss at that.
But is was probably a good loss as although bad for national prestige, it un-
doutedly made his forces realize they havemuch further to go.
And it is that much further that they have gone. They have won five
gamies in a row, keep rdunning up impressive offensive totals (their apparent
weakness) and seem to dominate each game they are in.
l For example, in the Illinois encounter, after a terrible first half, Bo's
n ridders simply rolled over a pesky Illini contingent. The Wolverines, right
off the bat in the second half, forced the turnover that set the tone for the rest
iof the half.
Several plays later, the first TD was scored. And just a few minutes
later, another touchdown was tallied. On the Wolverines third touchdown,
they went for the first down on fourth and five at the Illini 30. Michigan's
blockers simply crushed the Illinois defense and Butch Woolfolk sailed into
the end zone from the 30.
It looked so effortless, as they rolled up the score. But thenagain, winning
always looks so easy for Michigan. Every year you get the feeling Michigan
5vill come out on top.
Wolvlerine seasons appear to follow a distinct pattern. After some mid-
season slump or snag, Michigan becomes invincible in the Big Ten: And in
!,easier games like Illinois the Wolverines play well enough to win. Against
Minnesota this year, although the Gophers drew within. three at one point,
: you just knew Bo's boys would come up with the big play-and they did as
1,Woolfolk sprinted 41 yards for the clinching touchdown.
The Wolverines are powerful, again. Their defense is as strong as it has
rver been. Curtis Greer, Ron Simpkins and Mike Jolly are some of the finest
,players in the nation.
And now, the offense is in gear somewhat. B.J. Dickey has established
rt himself as the number one quarterback. The talents of Anthony Carter,
d,.Ralph Clayton and Doug Marsh are unlimited. Bo's offensive line has
matured considerably, enabling two of the Big Ten's finest tailbacks to run
efree.
Stanley Edwards is hurt and may be unable to play against Indiana so
-all Bo does is call on Woolfolk. He has been real shoddy the last two weeks
,with TD runs of 58, 41, 30, 1 and 1.
Blue wins look effortless
' But Michigan's winning always seems so blase, and Schembechler
Xouldn't agree more. In yesterday's press luncheon, he said, "all of us at
JMichigan are a little bit spoiled. After beating Illinois 27-7, they (the players)
didn't say a thing. It was like they just came off the practice field. Anytime
;you beat a team in its own backyard, it's a big win."
p "Everything we do negatively is magnified. You say Michigan wins by
0 points and then you (the media) say we've struggled," Bo continued.
# Bo is right. Michigan is spoiled and so is he. In a telephone hookup at the
*ncheon with Indiana head coach, talkative Lee Corso, Bo had this to say.
Don't try to con them (the writers). You know if you win your last four
dames, you'll go to the Rose Bowl. If you Win three out of four, it's a good
season," Bo concluded.
Bo is not conning anybody. He knows he's got a very good team and is
pretty sure where they'll end up. There seems to be no other way for him.
So amid all the controversy around him this season, one thing remains
clear. He is one fantastic coach who knows no other way but to win as his
teams do year in and year out.
But he won't say he has a great team as Michigan State's Darryl Rogers
has said because, Bo is spoiled. He is spoiled to the point of not reavping.
satisfaction until he wins his last five games. I have the feeling he'll win of
those five.
And especially since Stanford can't smell roses.
2FREE12Z.COKES
With Purchase of Any
1 Item or More Pizza a
(WITH THIS AD),

Defense is a strong institution
under Michigan head football
coach Bo Schembechler. It has
been ever since his reign of
leadership began at Michigan.
Current co-captain Ron Simpkins
is only one of many in the line of
defenders that have gained noted
recognition for their brilliant
play.
In 1976, linebacker Calvin
O'Neal led the Wolverine defense
straight to Pasadena. That 1976
season was one of ups and downs
for O'Neal and his teammates as
the Wolverines suffered a major
defeat on the road against Pur-
due only to regroup for a momen-
tous 22-0 slashing of Ohio State in
Columbus.
O'Neal, co-captain of that
team, gained All-America honors
that year as he paced the
Michigan defense with 86 solo
tackles and 54 assists.
This Saturday, number 96 will
be back in Michigan Stadium
along with many other former
Michigan All-Americans as part
of this year's Homecoming
celebration, marking 100 years of
Michigan football.
I B 48CIAMA ' GB
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