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October 23, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-23

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 23, 1979-Page 3

The Amos Tuck School
of Business Administration
Dartmouth College* Hanover, N. H.
Men and women seeking
EDUCATION FOR MANAGEMENT
are invited to discuss the
TUCK MBA
with
Marilyn Hammond
Admissions Representative
Tuesday, October 30
Career Planning and Placement
3200 Student Activities Building
764-7457

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HEY YOU .

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SOME 3,000 ANTI-NUCLEAR demonstrators march from Lansing's Riverside Park to the Capitol grounds as part of an afternoon rally Sunday.
Anti-mnuclear protesters rally at Lansig

By JOYCE FRIEDEN
One message at Sunday's demon-
stration against nuclear power in Lan-
sing was that more demonstrations
against nuclear power may not do
much good.
Perhaps disappointed by a lower tur-
nout than had been anticipated,
organizors said action, not speeches,
are needed to achieve their uncom-
promising goal - the end to nuclear
power in the state and the country.
DESPITE A delightfully warm In-
dian Summer afternoon, anti-nuclear
luminaries such as Howard Morland -
author of the article on the H-bomb
published in the Progressive magazine
after a long censorship.battle - and the
promise that protest in the right kind of
numbers might make a difference, only
about 3,000 demonstrators marched in
Lansing during the peaceful four-hour
rally.
It wasn't a failure, but it wasn't as
they'd hoped. Organizers had predicted
the march would top the figure reached
in Midland in April when 5,000 demon-
strated.
But on Sunday the most generous -'
estimate reached 4,000, while most
figured lower. One state patrolman put
the number at 1,000.
"THOUSANDS OF us are standing up
against nuclear power," local Arbor
Alliance member Lynn Boumaster told

the crowd which lounged on the Capitol
grounds after most of the speeches and
songs and chants were done. "But when
we go to the Legislature, our voices are
not heard. The courts deny our
petitions. But take the corporation's
money away, and suddenly their power
evaporates."
Boumaster was referring to a "rate
strike" against Detroit Edison and
Consumer's Power. Strikers would
refuse to pay that portion of their mon-
thly bill used to finance nuclear power
plant construction. Since the customers
who do not pay their bills are entitled to
both a check on their meter and a court
hearing, say organizers, the money and
effort spent by the power company
fighting the strike would be con-
siderable if many participated.
Mary Dent, a member of the Oct. 21
Coalition, a group of representatives
from across the state, said: "A rate
strike hasn't been tried before and it
needs to be tried. Just holding rallies
isn't going to do it."
THE MARCH began at Riverside
Park in Lansing, where pro-nuclear
demonstrators passed out information
and held up signs such as the one
reading, "We're not Fonda Jane."
"Fusion energy has been proven a
feasible concept," said Marty Rowland,
a University of Michigan engineering
graduate and a member of the Fusion

4 Wow
FILMS
Cinema I-Salt of the Earth, 7, 9p.m., Aud. 3,MLB.
Cinema Guild-Shame, 7,9:05 p.m., Old. Arch Aud.
SPEAKERS

Energy Foundation. "We must have
fission (power plants) to get the
economy ready when fusion technology
arrives."
The anti-nuclear marchers had
various reasons for opposing any form
of nuclear power.
"THE TECHNOLOGY is so complex
that it's just impossible to operate (it)
without accidents," said 72-year-old
Carfon Foltz, a member of the local Ar-
bor Alliance. "Even the engineers ad-
mit there will be accidents." Foltz is
planning to go-to Washington next week
for a protest with members of the
clergy against nuclear weapons and
nuclear bomb testing.
Disposal of radioactive waste produc-
ts is a big concern of Harry
Moldenhauer, a Michigan State
University student. Moldenhauer is a
researchers
measure
solar
radiation
By WILLIAM THOMPSON
University researchers are
measuring solar radiation levels
around the state in an effort to provide
exact figures for the construction of
solar collectors.
The Solar Radiation Project (SRP) is
run by the Department of Energy to
make it easier for Americans to use
solar energy and to publicize the fact
that it is a workable energy source.
MEMBERS OF the University's At-
mospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Department working out of North
Campus are covering one of the six
national regions for the SRP. Sunday,
they launched their drive to create
public awareness of their work by
enhibiting their equipment.
The exhibit was part of a tour of area
facilities involved with solar energy
and was sponsored by "Sunburst
'79", a conference on solar energy held
in Ypsilanti over the weekend.
The SRP measures solar radiation
and issues data which serve as a
guideline for how solar equipment can
be used in this area. "The purpose of
this is to cater to the public;" said SRP
research assistant Bruce Baker.
The design of a solar collector, which
See RESEARCHERS, Page 6
The University of Michigan
Alumni Association
in cooperation with
The School of Music
present
alMziliBlues
In Joint Concert With The
Wiconsin ngers
NOV. 2, 1979 8:00 p.m.
POWER CENTER

member of the "Big Rock 14," a group
of people who were arrested last
December for trespassing at the Big
Rock nuclear plant. The case is curren-
tly under appeal.
"There are just no viable solutions to
the problem of waste disposal,"
Moldenhauer said.
At the Capitol, protesters sat on the
lawn for over three hours. Among the
musicians who performed was Holly
Near, nationally-known activist and
folksinger. "I'm very much opposed to
the 'nuclear mentality'," Near said.
She said the need for cohesion among
the marchers is important. "Among us
are many different ways of thinking
and feeling. We must remember not to
be oppressive to each other."
See ANTI, Page 6

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Does Every Option Look Good To You?
Do You Have Restless Nights Every Time You
Make A Decision?
Is Making The Right Decision Just Dumb Luck?
Then,... Beat The Odds
And Come To A Workshop On
DECISION MAKING.,
Wednesday, October 24
11:30-1:30, Kuenzel Room in the Michigan Union
P.S. You have the option of buying the University Club's Cold
Buffet and "Make Your Own" Sandwich or bringing your own
lunch. The decision is up to you.
SPONSORED BY:
Student Organizations,
Activities, & Programs,
1310Michigan Union, 11
763-5911

Ecumenical Campus Center International Center-James Fine,
"Israel-Palestine Peace Prospects", noon, International Center.
Physical Education-John Faulkner, "Contracile Properties of
Human Skeletal Muscle", 12:10 p.m., 1250 CCRB.
Public Policy Studies-Theodore Moran, "Multinational Cor-
porations and Bargaining Power in the Third World", 12:30 p.m., West
Conference Room, Rackham. ,'
College of Engineering-Michael Ronan, "Some Applications of
Topolohy to Finite Geometry',, 4 p.m., 3201 Angell Hall, Khalil Mancy,
School of Public Health, "The ,Environmental Impact of the Nile
Resources Management", 4 p.m.; White Auditorium, Cooley Building.
Thomas M. Cooley Lectures-Guido Calabresi, "Nonsense on Stilts?
The New -Law and Economics Twenty Years Later", "The
Inevitability of Interpersonal Comparisons: The Pointlessness of
Pareto and Some Thoughts on Paternalism and Changing Tastes", 4
p.m., 120 Hutchins Hall.
School of Education-Robert Knights, Carleton University,
"Neurophysiological Testing in Children with Learning Problems", 4
p.m., Schorling Auditorium.
Bioengineering-Robert Marshall, "Multispectral Spectroscopy", 4
p.m., 1042 East Engineering.
Art School-Edys Hunter, "The Mystique and Traditions of Provin-
cetown", 4 p.m.,'Slusser Art and Arch. Building. 1
Geology and Mineralogy-Prof. Robert Smith, University of
Missouri, "Yellowstone: A Window Into The Earth", 4 p.m., 4001 C. C.
Little.
Spartacus Youth League Forum-Brian Mendis, ''Dump. the
'Repubi/icrats' and Build a Workers Party: Hate Carter! Hate
Capitalism!" 7:30 p.m., Trotter House.

TWO NEWSMEN
from the W Str
W -1 eet CJo U
will be on campus
TH URSDAY, NOVEMBER 1st
to interview Sophomore, Juniors, Seniors and Grad Students in-
terested in Journalism Careers.
Charles Camp, Detroit Bureau Chief,
and
Richard Martin, Chicago Bureau Chief
at the Student Publications Building
420 Maynard St.
2-5 pm on Nov. 1st
A S D
COMPUTERS __INSTRUMENTS,
HEWLETT ~hbPACKARD
" INVESTS 10% OF SALES IN R&D FOR TECHNICAL
LEADERSHIP AND SUSTAINED HIGH GROWTH
" ENCOURAGES INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTION IN AN
INFORMAL SMALL-COMPANY ATMOSPHERE
" OFFERS THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND
RESOURCES OF A CAREFULLY MANAGED $2 BILLION
COMPANY
" HAS OPENINGS THROUGHOUT THE U.S. FOR BS, MS OR

PERFORMANCES
Music School-Faculty harpsichord recital, 3 p.m., St. Andrew's
Church.
Department of Dance-Gus Solomon lecture demonstration, 8 p.m.,
Studio Theater.
Musical Society-Gaulin Mime Company, 8 p.m., Power Center.
MEETINGS

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