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October 19, 1979 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-19

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 19, 1979-Page 3

Sullivan
asks govt.
to sanction
U.S. firms
in S. Arica
WASHINGTON (Reuter)-General
Motors Board Member Rev. Leon
Sullivan yesterday called on the U.S. to
impose sanctions on U.S. firms that fail
to promote equality in South Africa.
Sullivan, whose six principles for
conduct by U.S. firms in South Africa
have been signed by 135 businesses,
said the government must do more than
say it supports the principles.
"I'M CALLING on the United States
government to take a stronger stand on
the Republic of South Africa and to con-
sider placing penalties and sanctions
against' companies that do not promote
fair employment and equal opportunity
in practice and help apartheid," he said
at a Washington news conference.
Sullivan suggested tax penalties, Ex-
port-Import Bank sanctions and the
withholding of federal contracts from
companies that do not comply with the
principles.
ULLIVAN SAID that U.S. banks
should make no further loans to the
South African government until there
was clear, tangible evidence that apar-
theid had been ended.
U.S. banks should consider only
specific, privately sponsored projects
developed in cooperation with blacks
and other non-whites which contributed
to their social and economic advan-
cement and which did not support apar-
theid.
He also singled out Japanese firms
that do business in South Africa for
special mention.
"APARTHEID IS cracked," he said,
"but it is going to require the effort of
all the American companies, help from
foreign companies including the
Japanese companies, world public
opinion and the support of the gover-
nment and the help of people inside
South Africa for it to crumble."
He added:- "I singled out the
See SULLIVAN, Page 9

New to nukes
Daily Photo by DAVID HARRIS
Students from Emerson Elementary School look at a model nuclear reactor as part of National Energy Education
Day yesterday at the Institute of Science and Technology. The event was sponsored by Women for Nuclear Energy.
The children's trip to the Phoenix Nuclear Reactor was delayed by a power outage that occurred in four buildings
near the one which holds the reactor.
Greeks' recruitment methods
contribute to membership jump

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By BONNIE JURAN
The late 60s and early 70s were hard
on the Greek system. Fraternities and
sororities represent tradition and
tradition didn't sell well on campus
during those years.
At the height of the Greek era there
were 50 fraternities and 24 sororities.
Today ;there are 33 fraternities, 16
sororities.!
In recent years, however, a
resurgence of interest in Greeks has
become so strong several chapters
have been able to reestablish them-
selves on campus.-
TWO CHAPTERS are in the process

of making comebacks. Collegiate
Sorosis folded in 1969. Today, the alum-
nae are raising money and looking over
possible houses in an attempt to reac-
tivate the chapter.
They're at a standstill, though, since
they must wait to be voted members of
Panhellenic, the student-run governing
body for many sororities.
"Sororities with houses will not at-
tempt to reestablish without member-
ship ii Panhellenic," according to
President Susan Clark. "In the case of
Collegiate Sorosis, there is much con-
troversy over whether or not to admit
them. The issue is not whether or not we

like them but if they belong here now.
"THE SMALLER houses feel it will
be an added struggle (to recent mem-
bers), having another house on campus
whereas the larger houses want them
because of the added diversity they of-
fer," Clark said.
Acacia, a social fraternity which
closed in 1970 due to inadequate interest
after 66 years is also attempting to
reestablish on campus.
Returning Acacia to the University is
a four-fold process, according to Tom
Piernik, an Acacia consultant from the
national office in Boulder, Colorado.
It involves:
, Identifying student interest in
fraternities;
" Making sure the University is in-
terested in developing new fraternities;
Identifying alumni support, and;
" Launching an advertising cam-
paign to inform students about the
group.
PIERNIK ACKNOWLEDGES there
are some problems involved in re-
establishing a fraternity: "It is
sometimes difficult to keep active sup-
See GREEKS', Page 12

Student group prepares for national
meeting on future of labor movement

By NICK KATSARELAS
A University student group is
organizing a conference on labor,
scheduled for January, which promises
to. be one of the most prestigious
gatherings of labor leaders in the last
several years.
Students for Employment and
Economic Democracy (SEED), is
comprised of a half-dozen Michigan
students who have been working ar-

duously since May to put together the
two-day conference titled "The 1980's:
Plight or Prosperity?'
THE CONFERENCE will not only
examine the future of the American
labor movement, but also will offer an
interaction between labor and Univer-
sity students, according to co-
coordinator Mark Finkelstein.
"There needs to be stronger links
between the labor community and the

FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Bernardo Bertolucci, 1977, 7 p.m. only, MLB
Aud. 4.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-New Wave Cinema: National Lamhpoon Disco,.
7, 10:20 p.m.; Beaver from Outer Space, 8:40 p.m. only,- both in MLB Aud. 3.
Cinema II-The Innocent, 7, 9 p.m., Angell, Aud. A.
Gargoyle Films-Harbarella, 7, 9 p.m., Business School, Hale Aud.
Mediatrics-Five Easy Pieces, 7:30, 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
PERFORMANCES
UAC-The New Musket Co., In the Boom Boom Room, 8 p.m., Res. Coll.
Aud.
Music School-University Chamber Choir, Thomas Hilbisch, conductor,
8 p.m., Hill.
PTP-Guest Artists Series, Idiot's Delight, 8 p.m., Power Center.
SPEAKERS
Astronomy Visitor's Nights-Eliot Malumuth, "Giant Galaxies-Can-
nibals of the Universe," 8:30 p.m., Angell, Aud. B.
Wholistic Health Council-Kathryn Davies, M.D., "Foof'and Chemical
Sensitivity," 7:30 p.m., Wesley Lounge, 602 E. Huron.
Guild House-luncheon, Helen Howe, "Whose Body, Whose Decision?,"
802 Monroe, noon.
Information Science Colloquium-Prof. Bertram Brookes, "The Basis of
Quantification in Social Science," noon, Rackham, E. Conf. Rm.
Career Planning and Placement-Career seminars for humanists,
George Hartshorn, Ford Motor Co., "Training and Development," 3 p.m.,
Rackham, E. Lec. Rm.
Huron Valley. Institute, George Ebeling, clinical staff member,
"Children and Divorce," 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room.
NASCO-Ralph Nader and Maggie Kuhn, "Economic Democracy," and
"Life Style of this New Age-Independence and Cooperation," 7 p.m.,
Michigan Union Ballroom.
MISCELLANEOUS
School of Metaphysics-Workshop on "Reincarnation: Does It Make
Sense?," 7:30 p.m., 219'/2 N. Main.
Workshop on co-ops-NASCO Institute '79, Co-op Training for the '80s,
information on starting co-ops, co-ops for elders, food and housing co-ops,
and the co-op bank, Michigan Union. Call 663-0889 to register.
International Center-Apple picking and cider mill, 3-6 p.m., sign up In-
ternational Center, Rm. 18.
Hillel-Orthodox Minyan, 6:.30 p.m., Dinner; 7:45 p.m., Reform Minyan,
8p.m., 1429 Hill.
Union Gallery-Upper Peninsula Artists display, 10-6 p.m., Michigan
Union.
Society of Women Engineers-McDonnel-Douglas pre-interview, 8:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m., 270 W. Engineering.

University," said Finkelstein.
"We need to give students an ex-
posure to labor," added Marvin
Shapiro, another program co-
coordinator. "1980 appears to be a good
time to look back on what labor has
done," he said.
THE CONFERENCE, will bring
together labor leaders, blue-collar
workers, students, and academicians in
a series of lectures and workshops to be
held next January 18 and 19. The topics
of the workshops include plant closings,
students in labor, union busting, and
southern organizing.
"The workshops are an attempt to get
away from text-book analysis of labor
and economics," explained committee
member Robert Leighton.
The conference has generated much
excitement, both state and nationwide.
The United Auto Workers union (UAW)
has agreed to co-sponsor the event,
along with the Michigan State Building
and Construction Trades Council, and
United Steel Workers District 29.
See NATIONAL, Page 12
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