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October 19, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-19

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Page 2-Friday, October 19, 1979-The-Michigan Daily

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EARLY BIRD SAVINGS
$100 OFF
d PHOTO
GREETINGS

FORMER 'U' PRESIDENT UNDER CONSIDERA TION:
Fleming: Ed. det. chief?

Beast's
a hit ten
thousand
yrs. later
JOHN GOjYER

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COUPON REDEEMABLE WHEN ORDER IS
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VAILID ENTIRE MONTH OF OCTOBER, 1979. f
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PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
ii 1115 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
PHONE: 665-6101J

From wire and staff reports
WASHINGTON - Former University
President Robben Fleming is under
consideration tobe the first secretary
of education, White House sources say.
Clifton Wharton Jr., former president
of. Michigan State University (MSU) is
also under consideration, the sources
said. Wharton, who left MSU in
January 1978, a year before Fleming
took a post as head of the Corporation
for Public Broadcasting in Washington,
is currently head of the State Univer-
sity of New York.
THESE SOURCES, who declined to
be identified, said that at least seven
names are on various lists, but that no
list has been sent to Carter. No consen-
sus candidate has emerged among the
White House staff, they said.
"I don't know about it," Fleming said
last night. "I never really thought about
being considered for the job.
"I wouldn't take the story too
seriously," he added. "This is a great
town for rumors, and my name gets

thrown around a lot."
A DAY AFTER President Carter
signed a bill creating the Department of
Education, White House aides said the
search is far from complete. Some of
the best-known names in public
education are under consideration, they
indicated.
The sources said that prominent on
the lists are: Fleming, Wharton, Alan
Campbell, director of the Federal Of-
fice of Personnel Management; Mary
Berry, who has been assistant
secretary for education in the Depar-
tment of Health, Education, and
Welfare; Wilson Riles, superintendent
of California's school system, and;
television journalist Bill Moyers.
The Carter administration has
broadened its search.for a secretary of
education after former New Mexico
Gov. Jerry Apodaca apparently talked
himself out of the job, White House
sources say.
INTERVIEWED BY telephone
yesterday, Apodaca, whose guber-
natorial term expired in 1978, said he
met with Carter in the Oval Office for
half an hour in early August and again
aboard Air Force One on Oct. 10 during
a flight to New Mexico.
Apodaca, 45, originally promoted by
White House political aides interested
in seeing more appointments from the
Hispanic community, had been thought

to have
education
still nn th

The University of Michigan
Department of THEATRE & DRAMA
presents . .
The game that never means
anything...and never ends
October.
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Fortune 300 '
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Featul"aGestAris n Res
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echr~~al ~POWER CENTER
Placement Offlcetoarrange Wed.-Sat. Oct. 17-20 at 8pm
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the inside track on the
post. While he is formally
e lists of candidates, he ac-

Fleming
tually is out of the running, these aides
said.
"He didn't impress the president in a
meeting they had," said one aide. "He
apparently wasn't that heavy substan-
tively on education issues."
AFTER APODACA met with Carter,
the sources said, the whole process
started over to find a chief to run the
department, which will have 17,000 em-
ployees and a $14.2 billion budget.

Forget for a moment that University
scientists hear of Mastadon discoveries
about once a year. Pretend Mastadon
skeletons have not been found in every
county in the bottom half of the lower
peninsula.
Now put yourself in the place of
Douglas and Shannon Johnson of rural
Richfield, Mich., last Saturday when a
neighbor wandered over to their place
with a four foot thigh bone he'd found.
AN' EARTHMOVING machine
digging a pond on the Johnsons' pond
had exposed a femur, or thigh bone,
belonging to a giant wooly ancestor of
the elephant who died on what would
10,000 years later be the Johnsons'
place.
"I just can't believe how much they.
found," said Shannon Johnson of the
archeological dig that has replaced the
construction dig on her land. "It keeps
going on and on."
Monday morning the Johnsons calle'
Ann Arbor.
THE SKELETON of the beast who
once roamed the lower peninsula is
"exceptionally large," according to
University Paleontologist Gerald Smith
who is at the site with other resea-rchers
to determine when and how the animal
died. So far, Gerald Paulsen, -a
preparator from the University and,
others have removed the front half of=
the skeleton, including two nine-foot'
tusks found in their proper positions in
the Mastadon's skull.
"Much of the skeleton is there and in
place," Smith said. The job should be
completed by the weekend, he said.
The Johnsons are providing a trailer
for Paulsen to live in while he works.
Johnson, who seems to know as much
about Mastadons as any zoology major,
was effusive in her thanks to those who
had helped the family.
Not only had police worked overtime
to keep looters away, but townspeople
had helped with the digging, and one
person even bought a tent so the ex-
cavatiork could go on in the rain.

HEW offers 'U'
ichigamu Roptions
SContinued from Page 1)

cortinued. "At this point, the only thing
that can be said is that the University
will take them into consideration under
advisement from the University attor-
ney and will respond in due course."
The vice president said he had no idea
how long it would take the ad-
ministration to get back in touch with
HEW and that he has not discussed the
matter with Interim University
President Allan Smith. Easthope,

however, said he was certain talks bet-
ween the federal agency and the
University would continue and could
result in a meeting between the two
parties.
The administration was given 90 days
from the issuance of the decision on'
Sept. 20 to come into voluntary com-
pliance with Title IX.

OVER 300 GA THER A T FEDERAL BUILDING:
Crowd protests against rape

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(Continued from Page i)
Coha pointed out, however, that
women are still afraid to go to the police,
and rape still is a stigma to the woman
who is victimized. "We as a society,"
said Coha, "are responsible for the rap-
victims."
"Our anger," said Cathy Keresztesi,
one of the Women in Action organizers
of the rally and march; "should be
directed at the system that forces
violence out- of its people and needs
violence to survive."
The message that consumerism and
the negative representation of women
in the media are reasons for the vic-
timization of women was loud and clear
on Liberty Street. After the rally, men
were asked to step aside in solidarity as.
women marched through the streets
chanting, "Take back the night. Take
back the night!"
Rice stressed that the women mar-
ched without men as a symbolic
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-90)
Volume L.XXXX, No. 38
JF iday, October 19. 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
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side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
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G 1

gesture; the area they traversed
usually is considered unsafe for women
to walk unescorted at night.
Their route tools them past
Washington, Ingalls, Observatory;
Catherine, and Huron Streets, passing
the Adult Bookstore, MLB, the Univer-
sity Hospital, and some downtown bars,
then back to the ,Federal Building.
These sites were chosen because, ac-
cording to Women in Action member
Jackie Rice, they are the areas with the
highest incidence of rape.
There will be a mass meeting as a
follow-up to last night's rally and mar-
ch in the Kuenzel room of the Union
Monday, October 22, at 7:30 p.m. The
meeting is intended to form strategies
to work on the long-term problem of
rape and societal changes. -

Also at the rally was the Theater
Company of Ann Arbor, which pefor-
med 'Judy Grahn's "A 'Woman, is';
Talking to Death," about a 55-2year-old
woman found in the snow after being
raped. Paula Amann sang "Take Back
the Night," a song about rape by Sue
Fink and Joelyn Grippo. Barb
Christansen, a black belt in karate, per=
formed a self-defense maneuver called
a kotta.
Last night's rally was one of many
Take Back the Night rallies and mar-
ches that have been held on campuses
and in cities throughout the country.
This was the first "Take Back the
Night" in Ann Arbor, although similar
ones have taken place recently in Yp-
silanti and Lansing.

Profs., administration
disagree on pay hike

COMPOSITION

0 0 0

Ib + Sban+ 1OuI

HELD OVER
By Popular Demand-
- THREE DA YS ONL Y-
SENIOR PORT RA IT S
THRDARE CONTINUING
ITHROUGH WEDNESDAY

(Continued from Page 1)
University should ask the state for
"that which we need now."
"I'm personally very supportive of
the suggestion," said Regent Deane
Baker (R-Ann Arborl). "My question
is: How do we do it?"
HIGHLIGHTING the annual after-
noon visit to Flint were presentations
on the riverfront campus, and its new
and projected facilities. The Regents
and executive officers journeyed
through the newest areas of the Univer-
I

STAR

BAR

sity branch campus when they com-
pleted the day's business.
The Regents also tabled an item con-
cerning a small construction project at
Flint. They said they were concerned
about the lack of bids. The lowest bid-
der is a company, Sorenson-Gross of
Flint, which has taken the University to
arbitration in a construction dispute.
Edgar Holt, a member of the
National Association for the Advan-
cement of Colored People (NAACP) in
Flint was the only speaker to address
the Regents during a public comment
session.
Daily Official Bulletin
FRIDAYOCTOBER 19, 1979
Daily Calendar:
Guild House: Luncheon, Helen Howe, Exec. Dir..
Religious Coalition for Abortion Rights: "Whose
Body, Whose Decision?", 802 Monroe. noon.
Industrial and Operations Engineering: J.
Weglarz, "Control Theory Models for Resource
Allocation Problems," 229 W. Eng., 3 p.m:
Career Planning and Placement: George Har-
tshorn, Ford Motor Co., "Training and Develop-
ment," E. Lee. Rm., Rackham, 3 p.m.
Astronomy: Eliot Malumath, "Giant
Galaxies-Cannibals of the Universe," Aud. B,
Angell, 8:30 p.m.

109 N. Main St.-769-0109
APPEARING TONIGHT: DICK SIEGEL and his
MINISTERS OF MELODYS
"Ann Arbor's Original Honky Tank Dance Bar"
The Uion Nhsbeen found
Yes, JENNIFER SIMON will be sitting prettier than she
expected to be at the Ohio State Game.
As WINNER of-the

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