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October 18, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DEADLINE FOR G.I. BILL FUNDS NEARS:

Vietnam vets to lose federal aid

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 18, 1979-Page 3
S EMIN A R
RICHARD L. SPROTT, Bar Harbor, Maine
Speaks on
"GENETIC ANALYSIS OF
AVOIDANCE BEHAVIOR"
THURSDAY, October 18-3:45 p.m.
Room 1057 MHRI
Tea at 3:15 at MHRI Lounge

By MARY FARANSKI
Some 887,000 Vietnam era veterans -
several hundred of them University
students - will become ineligible for
educational aid by next October when
their 10-year time limit under the
present GI Bill is reached, according to
Veterans' Administration predictions.
Veterans receive monthly checks
from the government while they are in
school that are intended to cover tui-'
tion, living expenses, and school sup-
plies. The problem is that the benefits'
are only given up to the tenth anniver-
sary of a veteran's separation from ac-
tive duty.

DAVE WILD, the Veterans'
representative on campus, reported
that there are between 700 and 800
students at the University who are
currently taking advantage of the
benefits. He said he is unsure how many
more are attending classes here who
are not aware that they are eligible.
In order to receive the benefits, a
person must have had at least 181 days
of continuous active duty any time bet-
ween January 31, 1955 and January 1,
1977. Veterans who received a
dishonorable release or discharge are
not eligible for the aid.

People in active duty at the present
will have a little more than ten years to
use their benefits, since the current bill
expires December 31, 1989.
WILD SAID the bulk of veterans fin-
i shed their active service between 1967
and 1969, and are thus ineligible now.
He stressed that those still eligible
should look into the program. "This is a
very good benefit for anyone who has
been in the service, but it has the time
limit on it," he said.
The size of the payment depends on
how many credit hours the veteran is
carrying, and how many dependents he
or she has. For example, a veteran who

is a full-time student with no dependen-
ts receives $311 a month, while a half-
time student with two dependents
receives $211.
Also available to veterans are a work-
study program and an educational loan
for those still within the ten-year "de-
limiting" period. Work-study jobs are
in a V.A.-related field, such as the V.A.
hospital. Tutorial assistance is also
available.
Nationally, the Veterans' Ad-
ministration estimated that only about
65 per cent of all eligible vets have used
the GI Bill.

LSA-SG picks executive board members

pp.

"""-PUBLIC NOTICE
LIQUIDATION OF
PERSIAN AND OTHER
ORIENTAL RUGS
ALL TO BE SOLD FOR UNPAID ACCOUNTS
TO OUR OVERSEAS CREDITORS
THROUGH FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON
AUCTION AT
BRIARWOOD HILTON
State Street at 1-94
Ann Arbor, Mich.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20,1979
Viewing 1 p.m.--Auction 2 p.m.
Public Inspection: On Sale Premises
Big, small, scatter and large room size rugs
includes silk Qum, Esphan, Nain, Tabriz, Kerman, Keshan Princess Bakhara,
Deep pile Bakhara, Tabotaby, Chinese, Romanian and Indian rugs.
ORIENTAL RUG PALACE
Counsultants-Appraisers--Auctioneers
of Massachusetts
TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

tP

By CHARLES THOMSON
The Literary College Student Govern-
ment (LSA-SG ) Executive Council
made more than 20 appointments last
night; filling four seats on the LSA-SG
Executive council and one position on
the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA).
Appointed to MSA at last night's LSA-
SG meeting was Tom Robinson, a
junior in the Residential College
studying philosophy. He said one of his
primary goals on the assembly will be
getting a student regent elected.
HE ADDED that he was also in-
terested in assuring student control of
the MSA budget and in establishing a
student supermarket that would serve
the same purpose for food as the
University Cellar currently serves for
school supplies.
The executive council appointed four
new members to its own ranks: Mark
Alonso, Beth Iori, Margaret Talmers,
and Greg Wert. Alonso, an LSA
sophomore, said he is interested in
developing more communication bet-
ween various student governmentson
campus.
TALMERS, AN LSA freshwoman,
said she wants to "find out how
programs in LSA can be improved."
Talmers also said she wants more
student participation in University
decisions.
The other two appointees to LSA-SG
executive council could not be reached
for comment.

Kathy Friedman, vice-president of
LSA-SG and a member of the commit-
tee that interviewed the applicants for
the positions, said she was "very ex-
cited" by the appointments and that she
was pleased with the number of ap-
plicants. Friedman said the appointees
have "a lot of energy and a lot of new
ideas."
VALARIE MIMS, an LSA-SG
Executive Council member and also a
member of the interviewing commit-
tee, said she was pleased by the number
of people who were interviewed. "I
think it shows that people are, willing to
take a more active role in their
education," she explained.
According to Friedman, more than 50
people were interviewed for the
positions.
One position that was not filled at last
night's meeting was the elections direc-
tor spot for the upcoming elections for
LSA-SG executive council. Bob
Stechuk, president of LSA-SG, said only
one person had applied for the position,
even though the council had been ad-
vertising for a director.
IN A RELATED action, the council
voted to change the election rules to
allow the LSA-SG election to be held 25
days after the appointment of an elec-
tion director. Before the council's ac-
tion, the election could not have been
held less than 50 days after the appoin-
tment of a director.
SStechuk, who proposed the change,
said the 50 day waiting period was too
long "since 50 days takes us up to.

almost next term (for holding the elec-
tions)." He said he "would love to have
the elections as soon as possible," ad-
ding that he hoped the election director
would be appointed next week.
The exeszutive council also discussed
eliminating the use of a preferential
ballot in LSA-SG elections.
At a previous meeting, council mem-
ber Dan Solomon had proposed the
change. But last night, after Stechuk

said such a change would require
revamping the constitution of the
organization and thus having two elec-
tions, Solomon changed his mind. "Why
don't we just forget it and realize that
it's not going to happen this year,''
Solomon said.
In other actions, the council:
" discussed using computers to count
the ballots in the next election;
* and allocated $200 for a secretary.

AATA official says new
plan proves more efficient

I,

1 '

FILMS
Cinema Guild-Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man, 7-9:05 p.m., Old
Arch.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-The Left-Handed Gun, 7-8:45 p.m.; Wagon
Master, 10:30 p.m. only, Aud A, Angell.
SPEAKERS
Center for W. European Studies-Jean Carduner, "The New Right in
France," noon, Michigan League.
Div. Biological Sciences-Prof. Dan Axelrod, "Motion of Cell-Surface
Receptors,"_noon, 1139 Nat. Sci.
MHRT - Richard L. Sprott, "Genetic Analysis of Avoidance Behavior,
3:45p.m., 1075 MHRI.
Comparative Literature-Prof. Rodolph Arnheim, "The Reach of Reality
in the Arts," 4:10 p.m., Rackham Amph.
LSA-Distinguished Sr. Faculty Lecture Series, Prof. Angus Campbell,
"Well-Being and Ill-Being,' 8 p.m., Rackham Amph.
Chemistry Dept.-Prof. Mustafa El-_sayed, "Time Resolved Laser Spec-,
troscopy; spectral diffusion in solids and conformation changes in
photobiological systems," 8 p.m., 1300 Chem.
Russian E. European Polish American Congress-Jerzy Turowicz, "The
Pope and Poland," 8p.m., Lecture rm. 2, MLB.
Rudolph Steiner Institute-Brian Butler, "The Problem of Evil in Our
Time," 8p.m., Rudolph Steiner House, 1923 Geddes.
Lecture-Wesley Morris, "The Irrepressible Real: JAcques Lecan and
Post-Structuralism," 4 p.m., W. Conference room, Rackham.
PERFORMANCES
PTO-Guest Artist Series, "Idiot's Delight," 8 p.m., Power Ctr.
Pendleton Arts Center-"Open Hearth," Janet Smarr, music for voice and
instruments, noon, 2nd floor, Union.
Guild House, poetry series, A. J. Lindenberg, Deborah Richardson, Amy
Ronner, 7:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Musical Society-Youri Egorov, pianist, 8:30 p.m., Hill.
Student Dance Compositions-3 p.m., Dance Bldg.
Concert Band and Chamber Winds-Carl St. Clair, conductor, 8 p.m., Hill.
EMU Symphony Orchestra-Russell Reed, conductor, 8 p.m., Pease Aud.
MISCELLANEOUS
Transporation Program Advisory Comm.-Transportation research
seminar series, Richard Duke and Gary Williams, "Conrail Re-regulation
Gaming Stimulation," 3 p.m., Rackham.
Women in Action-Take Back the MNight, rally and march to protest
rape, 7:30 p.m., Federal Bldg.
Sufi Order-Githa class, Mureeds only, (Call 994-3700 for location,) 8 p.m.
Career Seminar for Graduate Students in the Humanities who are in-
terested in Non-Academic Alternatives-George Hartshorn, Supervisor,
Training and Development department, Ford Motor Co., 3 p.m., E. Lecture
Room, Rackham.
Union Gallery-"Upper Peninsula Artists," exhibition of prints, weaving
and ceramics, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Union Activities Center-Guitar mini-course, sign up at Ticket Center,
Union Lobby. Call 763-1107 for information.

By SARA ANSPACH ,
The number of riders per hour on city
buses during the first full fare week of
the Ann Arbor Transportation
Authority's (AATA) new service plan
increased 35 per cent over last Oc-
tober's figures, Executive Director
Richard Simonetta reported at last
night's AATA meeting.
Several city residents, however,
voiced concern over the new plan's cuts
in service hours and elimination of
reduced fare passes for school children.
AATA's new service plan, implemen-
ted Oct. 1, includes increased fare from
35 cents to 50 cents, increased fixed
routes and elimination of Dial-A-Ride
services for the general public.
SIMONETTA NOTED that while
ridership has been down four per cent
from last year's figures, productivity
under the newly-implemented plan has
increased since overall service hours
have been cut. Last October, he said,
AATA buses serviced 8.4 passengers
per service hour compared to 11.3
passengers per service hour during the
first full fare week under the new plan.
The newly-implemented use of rider-
ship tokens, available to passengers at
a reduced rate of 35 cents, has really
"caught on," Simonetta noted.
The AATA voted last night to provide
student identification cards, which will
enable K-12 students to ride for 25 cents
Monday through Friday while school is
in session.
THE MOTION was passed for Thur-
ston school district residents who were
concerned that fares for school children
who regularly ride AATA buses had in-
State's nuke
crisis plans
upgraded
LANSING (UPI)-Lt. Gov. James
Brickley yesterday received upgraded
emergency plans for nuclear power
plant accidents which, expand the
evacuation areas to a radius of up to 10
miles around each facility.
Gov. William Milliken requested
upgrading in April after learning, in the
wake of the Three Mile Island incident,
that only one of the three counties
which host nuclear plants had a for-
mally-adopted emergency plan.
OFFICIALS SAID drills held in con-
nection with the upgrading demon-
strated the capability exists to
evacuate people during an accident, but
also showed need for improvements.
"The plans have been expanded to in-
clude evacuation procedures for a
radius of up to 10 miles around nuclear
power plants and work is continuing on
procedures for a radius of up to 50 miles
around the three plants," Brickley said.
ENERGY.
We can't afford
to waste it.
O YOU LOVE

creased from $10 per month to $28 per
month under the new plan.
The AATA also voted to spend a grant
from the Michigan Department of
Transportation to extend service hours.
In December the AATA- will add two
new routes, expand evening service one
hour, and provide later service to Yp-
silanti. In January, 1980, when new
buses arrive, an additional route and
increased frequency to the existing
Stadium route will be added.

j off
--~~

I

PIANTAUCTI0N
AND
SALE
Monday, Oct. 22- 7:30 p.m.
MATTHAEI
BOTANICAL GARDENS
1800 Dixboro Rd.
(South of Plymouth Rd.)
Indoor Lightgarden
Society of America
A'in Arbor Chapter

PITCHER
NIGHT
Th.brs. Oct. 18

Il

r
tout
Invites You To
Join Him For:

C Ount of
JpaSto

8p.m.-2a~m.
1140 S. Unive
668-8411

rsity
2 A.M.

at. 11 A.M.-2 AM. Sun. 3 P.M.-1

,

__ U

(pr ) Sport,,noun. Recreation.
Athletics. Pastime. Everyone
has a sport of some sort.
To play, compete, or 'ust to watch. Meijer is one of the
biggest sporting go ods stores around. o matter what
your sportis, Meijer Thrifty Acres has the quality gear
and the same name brands you want, priced to save you
money. So, instead of spending your last
dime at the sporting specialty goods store,
why not jog on over to Meijer and save
some money. Maybe enough for two seats
behind the dugout. Whatever your sport,
Meijer can outfit you. On the court
diamond, or field.e- -
And off.
Six miles southeast of campus on Carpenter Rd.
4
}
-I
-I

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