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October 18, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-18

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Page 2-Thursday, October 18, 1979-The Michigan Daily
A,2
A consumer group

TREASURY SECRETARY, VOLCKER, ISSUE WARNING
Miller: cut spending

tries to bea
By T HI CY YAGLE
A group of Ann Arbor consumers,
convinced that inf ition is here to stay,
have formed an organization they hope
will soften the blow on helpless wallets.
The Southeast Michigan Consumer
Alliance (SEMCA) is a group of more
than 50 people who "are fed up with
high prices." In response they are of-
fering Ann Arbor citizens discount
prices at area businesses, according to
one of the organization's founders Bart
Loeb.
THE BUSINESSES associated with
SEMCA agree to'offer 20 to 50 per cent
discounts to anyone carrying the club's
yellow and black membership card,
Loeb said. Cards are now available at
all area Pizza Bob's shops for $6. Mem-
bers also pay $1.83 in monthly dues.
The group was formed 10 months ago,
Loeb said, and was modeled after a
similar group in Minnesota.
SEMCA currently has nearly 1,500
members in this area, and will soon
open a branch office in Jackson. Ann
Arbor's branch is located at 100 S.
Forest.

t inflation
"WE DON'T charge the (member)
stores anything," Loeb said.
"Businesses love it because it increases
volume and they can afford to offer
discounts."
About 25 per cent of the group's
members are college students and the
rest are young businesspersons, Loeb
said. He added the group particularly
wants college students to join because
they can get the discounts as well as at-
tract other students and customers.
There are more than 80 area
businesses now associated with SEM-
CA, including such student favorites as
Tech Hifi on William St. and Bell's
Greek Pizza at 700 Packard St.
LOEB ADDED that he thinks "the
group will be a model for other groups
in the country." We hope to make this
the best, most complete consumer net-
work anywhere. Everybody goes crazy
when they first hear about SEMCA
because they can't believe it. They
think that there is a catch to it, but
there's not," Loeb explained.

WASHINGTON (AP) - Americans
face a reduction in their living standar-
ds if inflation is to be brought under
control, the chairman of the Federal
Reserve Board said yesterday.
"The standard of living of the
average American has to decline,"
Paul Volcker told the Joint Economic
Committee of Congress. "I don't think
you can escape that."
VOLCKER SA)ID Americans must
accept less because they are producing
less with the same amount of effort as
before, while the nation is losing
billions of dollars of its wealth each
year to oil-producing nations.
"If we fail to recognize that, and
people try to catch up with the existing
standard of living, or try to increase
their standard of living . . . up goes the

price level some more," he said.
Volcker said his best outlook for in-
flation this year is to reduce the annual
rate of price increase below 10 per cent
by the end of 1979, down from the
current 13 per cent annual rate of in-
flation.
ON ANOTHER front, Charles Schult-
ze, chairman of President Carter's
Council of Economic Advisers, said the
administration would consider its
policies successful if inflation falls
below 10 per cent "in the not-too-distant
future."
Volcker and Treasury Secretary G.
William Miller appeared before the
congressional panel to explain recent
government actions to drive up interest
rates and to slow economic growth in
the fight against inflation.

American consumers are saving too
little and borrowing too much, Miller.
said. He also said he did not want to.
"foreclose the possibility" that the,
government might need to impose.
direct controls to limit consumer
credit. But Miller said he didn't think
this action will be necessary.
MILLER CONCEDED that the'
tightening of credit "is a worry" for the'
housing industry because it could slow
the -amount of money available for'
home building and home-buying. But he
said the growth of money and credit in
the economy has to be restrained.
"If we do it rapidly enough, and for-
cefully enough, then housing does not
have to go into a tailspin," Miller said.

iiller
... worried about credit

UAC offers new mint-courses

abortion?.
.a }Free Pregnancy Testing
mmediate Results
Confidential.Counseling
r Complete Birth Control Clinic
Medicaid * Blue Cross
(31) 91.1810An n A rbor and
Downriverarea
w , (313) 559-0590 Southfield area
t Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc.

l

By MITCH STUART
To balance out a course load of horrors such as
organic chemistry, Econ 401, and foreign language
requirement, the University Activities Center (UAC) is
offering a series of 13 mini-courses including Magic,
Dream Analysis, and Disco Dancing.
The courses will be taught in the Michigan Union nd
will range in length from one session of one or two
hours, to six, two-hour sessions.
Tickets for the courses are available at Ticket Cen-
tral in the Union lobby 12 school days before each class
is scheduled to begin. Costs for the courses range from
free to $20 per couple (or $12 per person) for Ballroom
Dancing.
BO MANNING, chairman of the UAC Mini-Course
Committee, said the courses were created because,
"Thee are various skill areas that students have wan-
ted to explore, but have never had the time or mone; to
get into a course."
According to Manning, the mini-courses fill a gap for
students who may not have the time to take a Univer-
sity course they are interested in, but are not
necessary for their degrees. Also, he said the UAC

course fees are much cheaper than prices charged for
private instruction.
Although mini-courses have been offered for several
years, the program will be expanded this term. In the
past, mini-courses have been offered only one night,
for free or at very low cost. This year, however, the
courses have been expanded to include more material.
IN PREVIOUS YEARS, the courses have been sup-
ported financially by UAC, but this term those funds
have been eliminated and according to Manning the
mini-course program is now a "break even operation."
He said the change accounts for higher fees assessed to
students but Manning added that the fees are still less
than for private instruction.
Despite the fee hike, Manning predicts the mini-
courses will remain popular this term. Disco dancing
which has a 50 student limit and bartending, with two
sections of 25 students, are expected to close first, but
every course is expected to fill.
COURSE INSTRUCTORS come from throughout the
Ann Arbor community. A professional psychologist
will teach the Dream Analysis class, the Basic Invest-
ments course will feature a speaker from Merrill Lyn-
ch, and Ballroom Dancing will be taught by Jim Hilton,

the Union's operations manager and his wife Rhoda.
Hilton said he and his wife teach the course, "in our
spare time becaue we love it."
Univesity credit is not offered for the classes, which
generally do not offer any certification on completion.
The CPR course, however, offers official Red Cross
certification.
MANNING SAID the committee is already finalizing
plans to offer different courses next term. He said the
committee has "total freedom" in deciding which
courses to offer, and he urges anyone with coursb
suggestions to contact the committee.
Information on the courses is available in the UAC
offices on the second floor of the Union.
Courses offered this term are: Guitar, which beginis
today; CPR, beginning Oct. 31 and Nov. 20; Sign
Language beginning Oct. 30; Dream Analysis begin-
ning Nov. 1; Magic beginning Nov. 5; Ballroom Dan-
cing and Basic Investments beginning Nov. 7; Barten-
ding beginning Nov. 12 and 13; Disco Dancing begin-
ning Nov. 13; Massage, Plant Clinic, and Winetasting
all beginning the last week of November, and Cross

1

GRAD STUDENTS:
RACKHAM STUDENT GOVT.
FALL ELECTIONS
OCT. 30 & 31
APPLY NOW FOR THESE POSITIONS:
PRESIDENT PHYSICAL SCIENCES & ENGINEERING
VICE-PRESIDENT SOCIAL SCIENCES
DIVISION REPRESENTATIVES: HUMANITIES
BIOLOGICAL & HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION

Country Ski
December.

Waxing, beginning the first week of

Marines stage landing. exercise, in Cuba

APPLICATIONS AT 2006 RACKHAM

763-5271

DEADLINE: OCT 22 : 2

A
The University of Michigan
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Second Distinguished Senior Faculty
Lecture Series
Professor Angus Campbell
in a three-part series, will discuss
Psychological Well-Bemg

GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (AP) -
The U.S. Marine Corps flexed its might
on soggy Cuban soil yesterday in a lan-
ding exercise by 1,200 soldiers who
surged onto the island's U.S.-held
eastern tip aboard helicopters and am-
phibious craft.
Daily Official Bulletin
T"U'RS A OCTOBER 18,1979
D~ailyCalendar:
Center Western European Studies: Jean Carduner.
"The New Right in France." League, noon.
Division Biological Sciences: Dan Axelrod,
"Motion of Cell-Surface Receptors," 1139 Nat. Sci.,
noon.
MHRI: Richard L. Sprott, "Genetic Analysis of
Avoidance Behavior," 1075 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
Industrial and Operations Engineering: Stanley B.
Gershwin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
"Analysis of Unreliable Transfer Lines with Finite
Buffers," 243 E. Eng., noon.
English: Wesley Morris, "The Irrepressible Real:
Jacques Lacan and Poststreuturalism", W. Conf..
Rackham, 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: R. Brandt, MY-U., "Stability
of Non-Abelian Magnetic Monopoles," 2038 Randall,
4p.m.
Guild House: A. J. Lindenbery. Deborah Richar-
dson, Amy Rohner, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
Chemistry: Mustafa El-sayed, U-Calif.,; time
Resolved Laser Spectroscopy; Spectral Diffusion in
Solids and Conformation Changes in Photobiological
Systems," 1300 Chem, 8 p m.
Russian/East European Polish American
Congress: Jerzy Turowics. "The Popeand Poland."
Lec. Rm. 2, MLB, 8p.m.
* '

No weapons were fired, and no in-
juries or problems were reported in the
maneuvers at the U.S. Navy base on
Guantanamo Bay.
PRESIDENT CARTER ordered the
landing earlier this month. Carter said
at the time that he wanted there to be no
doubt that the United States could stand
up to the threat to American shores
posed by the presence of Soviet combat
troops in Cuba.
In the landing exercise, the Marines
moved into the 45-square-mile base in a
downpour yesterday morning. The
troops then entrenched in positions they,
would take to reinforce the base in an
emergency.

Military spokesmen said they saw no
evidence of Soviet surveillance yester-
day around the base - the only United
States base on communist soil.
HOWEVER, THE officials said a
small Cuban observation boat was spot-
ted about two miles from the base and
about 2,000 yards from a Navy carrier
early yesterday. The Cuban boat
moved away after a Navy frigate ap-
proached it.
Officers planning the exercise em-
pliasized .that it was a routine
maneuver. U.S. officials put the cost ofl
the exercise at $500,000.
Col. Louis Piantadosi, commander of
the landing forces, said live am-

munition was kept nearby but not
loaded into weapons because "This is
an exercise. We do not want anybody to
get hurt,"
THE RAIN delayed some parts,.of the
landing for a few minutes, but Pian-
tadosi said he considered the operation
a success. "I think what the exercise
does is show the American people thaf
the resolve is there and we have the
capability to defend," he said.
It took a week. to move the Marines--
and supplies from their base at Camp
Lejeune, N.C., to Guantanamo. But of-
'ficials emphasized that in a real
emergency, Marines would be flown to
the isolated base in a matter of hours. :

CREATIVE ANACHRONISTS ON CAMPUS:

4

Medieval enthusiasts hold cou rt

(Continued from Page 1)
and Pennsylvania is fought over each
year. No one seems to know how many
devotees live in this area.
SCA ATTRACTS a diverse member-
ship of students, professors,
housewives, and writers. Both young
and old are welcome, and students in
the organization come from both
grammar schools and universities.
From mock battles to 25 course feasts
that feature authentic costumes, table-
settings, foods, and etiquette, SCA
members immerse themselves in a
Medieval lifestyle.
Combat is a part of that lifestyle, and
SCA members who aspire to knighthood
must gain proficiency in the medieval
martial arts.
NOVICE FIGHTERS are carefully
trained by experienced knights, and,
according to SCA member Linda

Glasscock, "injury is very rare."
Prospective knights are taught to
recognize the relative severity of blows
in terms of the injury they would cause
if they were delivered with sharpened
steel instead of tape-wrapped rattan.
Fighting is on the honor system - com-
batants admit "injury" when they are
hit in the proper manner._
The Pensic War, as the war for Pen-
nsylvania is called, is a major event -
about 700 attended last year - in which
knights from the Middle Kingdom bat-
tle knights from the East Kingdom.
War is waged for three to four days.
The loser wins Pennsylvania.
Knights are expected to be more than
"sword jockeys," as one SCA member
put it. Indeed, many SCA members
devote themselves solely to the arts.
COSTUMING IS a popular art, and

October 4, 1979
October 11, 1979
October 18, 1979

,Psychological Well-Being
Well-Being Through
the Life Cycle
Well-Being and Ill-Being

i

A' rccclitif in Ractkhami Assembnly Hal.ll will followv thy fi nal lecnrr

PINBALL
AT THE UNION
50 machines
You name it,
We've got two of each!
UNION LANES
AND
UNION STATION

Kay of Triastrium,/known outside of
SCA by her "mundane name" of
Deborah Anderson, is a master
costumer.
She appeared at a recent meeting in a
velvet and taffeta costume patterned
after those found in the late 16th cen-
tury court of Elizabeth I. Equipped with
a hoop skirt and a steel-canvas corset,
Kay sacrifices comfort for authenticity.
All SCA members have personas:
separate names and personalities that
exist only in the medieval world of SCA.
SCA members act, dress, speak, and
function as their chosen personas when
attending events. Personas are often
elaborate, and backed up by lengthy -
personal histories and numerous
idiosyncracies.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS:344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 37
Thur'sday, October 18, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of ichigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Rackham Amphitheatre - 8:00 p.m.
All lectures are open to the public

c~l 1Y U1_t
'1,
I,. \,
I'
Y
I U i'

There once was a hungry young barber;
A love of good food he did harbor.
So, each day at one,
To the League he did run.
For the tastiest meal in Ann Arbor!
D.C.
S
heM

CAFETERIA HOURS;
11:30-1:15
5:00-7:15
SNACK BAR
7: 15-4:00

ti .

*
* , '
* S

M M M M M~I

Today Is

1
--_..
r, r
. . r

*
*
*
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*
*
*
*
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*

Next to Hill Auditorium
Located in the heart of the campus.
it is the heart of the campus ..

22
Yo
tic
on

I

end your League Limerick to:
anager, Michigan League
27 South Ingalls
eo will receive 2 free dinner
ckets if your limerick is used in
ne of our ads.

Interested Students and Faculty Invited. .
PRE- LAW
DAY

The Day

..,.-
L
a

Have Your
C . .. D ..4.-. : 4 T- I . K I - ,

Friday, Oct. 19
1:00 am-4:30 Dm

I

U'

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