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October 09, 1979 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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Page 12-Tuesday, October 9, 1979-The Michigan Daily
A2 March Against
Hunger draws 670;
$26,000 pledged

Smith says economic
problems confront 'U'

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
The 670 adults and children trudging
wearily along local streets Sunday
weren't walking for their health.
Rather, they were walking in behalf of
hungry people in Washtenaw County,
Peru, Vietnam, and Kenya.
The walkers, whose backs were
adorned with orange "Help Crop Stop
Hunger" signs, were participating in
Ann Arbor's fifth annual March Against
Hunger.
SPONSORED BY the Hunger Task
Force of Interfaith Council for Peace in
cooperation with the Michigan branch
of the Community Hunger Appeal of
Church World Service (CROP), the
weekend march will bring in more than
$26,000 to aid the hungry. That is, if the
marchers' per mile pledges all are
paid.
"This is a 25 per cent increase in par-
ticipation over last year," said Tom

Hayes, who helped coordinate the mar-
ch. "Our main objective is getting
people involved. We think that raising
awareness is as important as raising
money."
MORE THAN 500 marchers com-
pleted the 10-mile course which began
and ended at St. Andrews Episcopal
Church op S. Division. Checkpoints in
churches and synagogues along the.
route provided water, rest, and words
of encouragement.
"I've done it four times and the kids
really enjoy it," said Don Coucke, a six-
th grade teacher at St. Francis Elemen-
tary School who annually takes his
students on the march. "We've always
managed to walk the whole distance."
U.S. Rep. Carl Pursell (R-Ann Arbor)
and Rev. John Woods of the Bethel
A.M.E. Church of Ann Arbor co-chaired
the event and led ,members of the
student, civic, and religious community
on the first leg of the march.
"I'm pleased to help give this issue
the visibility it deserves," Pursell said.
He added that the success of the Ann
Arbor program has made it a model forl
similar drives throughout the nation.
Several hikers ended their grueling1
day with a simple meal of rice and tea
served at the church.

(Continued from Page 1)
salaries.
"THIS IS WHY we need some mind-
sets or thought patterns to be revised,
so that the operating units of this
University will turn to modes of self-
help for retaining quality, retaining
competitive posture in the educational
world, and determining which parts of
the program are worthy of continuation
in the face of restricted resources,''
Smith said.
He later pointed to the merging of the
Department of Speech and Theater
with the Department of Journalism,
creating a new Department of Com-
munications and Department of
Theater and Drama, as evidence of the
type Hof reorganization which will be
more common in the future analysis
and review of University programs.

After discussing financial matters,
Smith mentioned several significant
events during his nine months-plus as
president. Using a "verbal scrapbook,"
he touched such issues as the Univer-
sity's involvement in China policy, and
the Replacement Hospital Project,
which has been the focus of much of
Smith's efforts in the last nine months.
Smith also briefly commented on the
University's affirmative action
programs.
In closing, the interim president said:
"I will leave the office knowing that you
will have an extraordinarily able
president reporting to you next year. I
take pride in the Regents' appointment
of Harold Shapiro as the President of
the University because I want it to have
strong, capable, innovative, and
dedicated leadership - and it will."

SACUA releases reports
on Marwil tenure ease

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HUGHES

MICHIGAN UNION,
i SEVENTY-FIFTH
ANNIVERSARY
Women were only allowed to enter the Michigan Union
through the side door because the Union was a men s
club. This practice stopped in 1954. In 1968 women were
finally allowed to enter the billiards room unescorted.

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(Continued from Page 1)
compendium of policies or a faculty
code,or bylaw. He claimed that "the
language" is only a "double check to
department heads in order to insure
they do not accidentally allow someone
to stay on and acquire de facto tenure
after seven years."
SHAPIRO WAS referring to the
Regent's bylaw which states that any
one who has held a full-time teaching
appointment at the University for eight
years is granted the same rights as
someone who has formal tenure.
Because SARC members agreed the
ruling was ambiguous, they presented
additional reasons for granting a tenure
review. According to the report, Marwil
felt assured of a tenure'review, and this
expectation was heightened by mem-
bers of the department itself.
Marwil assumed he would be
reviewed because consideration for
tenure is routinely given to faculty
members who survive six years at the
University, and because he was given
oral and written statements which led
him to believe a review was forth-
coming. The report states that no one
informed Marwil he might not be con-
sidered for tenure. I
THE MEMBERS of SARC believe,
according to their report, that because
Marwil's expectation of a review was
justified, the department must consider
Marwil's case again.
Shapiro informed the Regents that
non-reappointment following an ap-
pointment for a limited time is not at all
uncommon. Therefore, SARC's conten-
tion that Marwil legitimately expected
a review because it is the usual
procedure is in question.
The report also states a review should
be granted because a number of faculty
Sitbigan
is preserved on
The Michigan Daily
420 Maynard Street
ANo
Graduate Library

members in Marwil's department ;
disagree with the decision of the Ad-
ministrative Committee. Members of
SARC assert that the denial of tenure
review in this case has a negative effect
on the whole department.
THE REPORT concludes, "We can-
not agree that the blocking of a tenure
review was a reasonable approach,
much less an approach that reflects the
highest ideals of this University."
Shapiro, however, concludes that the
procedures followed by the Department
of Humanities and the College of
Engineering were proper, and Marwil
"was given procedural consideration
beyond that required."
* Marwil, who could not be reached for
comment yesterday, was not informed
of the exact reasons for the decision not
to grant him a tenure review. Accor-
ding to Shaw Livermore, a history
professor and chairman of SARC, "It is
not standard procedure to explain the
justification for a particular decision.
The University council has told depar-
tments not to say very much about
denial of tenure, and it is sufficient
legally to tell the person that the proper
procedures were followed."
LIVERMORE CONCEDED that
Marwil's qualifications in the three
areas usually discussed in a case of
tenure review - research, teaching,
and service - were "average, maybe
better than average."
Some allegations have been offered
that Marwil's alleged abusive behavior
on several occasions was an important
factor in the department's decisiont
pecause Livermore said he has not
seen any assertions that Marwil was-in
any way deficient, he commented,
"One is led to draw one's own con-
clusions, and one might be led to think it
was personality problems."
Frank Kennedy, a Law School
professor and the first chairman of
SARC, spoke to SACUA members about
the Marwil case in an off-the-record
meeting several weeks ago. But yester-
day he reaffirmed his belief that
SACUA should not "throw its weight in-
to this," now that Marwil has brought
suit in a federal court.
Kennedy said he believes Marwil
presented a plausible case. "Under all
circumstances he should have a tenure
review. On a doubtful issue like this, it
should be resolved in favor of the
faculty member," he said.
If Marwil wins his court case,
however, Kennedy said he thinks the
University might rewrite and tighten
up its tenure rules and policies, thus
limiting some of the flexibility which
faculty members tend to view as
beneficial.
Marwil's case was discussed again
yesterday by SACUA in a closed
meeting with Interim University
President Allan Smith. SACUA's
meetings with the president are always
closed, ,as are meetings in which mat-
ters of personnel are discussed.

IDENTIFY THESE 5 UNION SITES &
* WIN 2 OHIO STATE TICKETS*
Submit entry to Office of Student Organizations, Activities, and Programs-1310 Union.
Use entry form (availble at office) or your own paper-enter as many times as you want.
DEADLINE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th-in case-of a tie-drawing will be held.

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GOOD LUCK!

COME TO THE UNION and SEARCH'

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Well, the Great Escape is here...this
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