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October 09, 1979 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Birds h(
By JON WELLS
On October 17, 1971 pitcher. Steve
=Blass of the;Pittsburgh Pirates weaved
masterful four-hitter, leading his
team to a 2-1, seventh game World
aSeries victory over the Baltimore
;rioles. Tonight in Baltimore at 8:30
p.m., eight years later, the same two
;eams square-off in the 76th 'Fall
Plassic' between the American and
National League champions.
Both teams are, without a doubt, wor-
;hy representatives of their respective
leagues. Baltimore, compiling 102 vic-
tories and the best record in the
American League, rolled over West
bivision champion California in four
games, outscoring them 26-15. Pit-
isburgh, like the Orioles, led its league
in winning percentage and was im-
$ressive in its three-game sweep. of the
incinnati Reds, outscoring its
eleagured West Division foes 15-5.
,~THIE ORIOLES have traditionally
een a team characterized by superior
Ditching and defense. This year's team
no exception. As a team, they led the
merican League in earned run
average with an outstanding mark of
x.26. Not one. Baltimore pitcher finished
with an ERA above 3.80.
American League Cy Young Award
Ievorite, lefthander Mike Flanagan (23-
,3.08), who will start the Series tonight
ar the Orioles, has been the stopper all
season long. His big-breaking curve
from the left side promises to create
roblems for Pittsburgh's lefthanded
ower duet of Dave Parker and Willie

REMATCH OF '71 CLASSIC
)st Bucs in Series opener tonight

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 9, 1979-Page 11

Weet

CFA

I

Stargell.
Orioles' manager Earl Weaver plans
to go with veteran righthander Jim
Palmer (10-6, 3.30) Wednesday night,
lefthander Scott McGregor (13-6, 3.35)
Friday night and, if he elects to go with
a four-man rotation, righthander Den-
nis Martinez (15-16, 3.66) on Saturday.
The Baltimore defense was tgird
over-all in the American League in
fielding percentage and boasts the
leading shortstop in the person of 1971
World Series veteran Mark Belanger.

Statistics aside, the Orioles win with
defense as third baseman Doug Decin-
ces artfully illustrated in the California
series.
AS IN 1971, when their hitters were
known as 'The Lumber Company,' the
name of the game in Pittsburgh is of-
fense. Led by Willie 'Pops' Stargell (32
HR, 81 RBI, .281 AVG.) and Dave
Parker (25, 95, .310) the Pirates were
third inthe National League in batting
(.270) and second in homeruns (140).

Their infield, much improved defen-
sively by the addition of shortstop Tim
Foli, is as dangerous offensively as any
in the major leagues with Stargell at
first, Phil Garner (.294) at second, Foli
(.287) at shortstop, and Bill Madlock
(.299) at third.
Pirate righthander Bruce Kison (13-7,
3.24) received the starting nod for
tonight's opener from manger Chuck
Tanner. Kison was a rookie with the
Pirates in 1971 and picked up the win in
the fourth game of the World Series by
limiting the Orioles to one hit over 62/3
innings of relief work. Tanner has said
that he will stick with a three-man
rotation, slating righthander Bert
Blyleven for game two and big lefthan-
der John Candelaria for game three.
The backbone of the Pittsburgh staff,
however, is located in their bullpen.
The ace fireman is righthander Kent
Tekulve (10-8, 2.81, 31 saves).
Righthander Enrique Romo (10-5, 2.99,
5 saves) and lefthander Grant Jackson
(8-5, 2.96, 13 saves) combine to give Pit-
tsburgh bullpen depth that is sure to b'e
a factor in the Series.
THE BALTIMORE bullpen, as well,
is anything but a liability. The Oriole
relief squad is a youthful blend of long.
and short relievers, anchored by
righthander Don Stanhouse (7-3, 2.85, 20
saves), lefthander Tippy Martinez (10-
3, 3.10, 3 saves), and rookie righthander
'Sudden' Sammy Stewart (8-5, 3.52).
Besides Kison, five other players
currently on the two teams' rosters par-
ticipated in the 1971 World Series. Willie
Stargell had a miserable series at the
plate, managing only five hits in 24 trips
to the plate, one RBI, and a .208 batting
average. Manny Sanguillen, now in his
twelfth season and limited to pinch-hit-
ting duty, was a terror for the Bucs,
collecting 11 hits in 29 at-bats for a .379
average.
Baltimore's three-time Cy Young
award-winning pitcher Jim Palmer
started two games in the series, win-
ning game two and pitching nine in-
nings in game six but not getting a
decision. Veteran Mark Belanger had a
mediocre series at the plate for the
Orioles, getting five hits and batting
.238.
Grant Jackson has the dubious
distinction of being this year's Benedict
Arnold. The 15 year veteran pitched
two-thirds of an inning for the Orioles in
the 1971 Series and now, eight years
later, finds himself in the other dugout.
Wells Tells: Birds plucked in six.

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
(The Club Sports Roundup, which will appear in the Daily every Tuesday this:
month, relates briefly the activities of Michigan's club sports teams during the
previous week.) ;.,

AP Photo
STARTING PITCHERS for tonight's opener of the World Series are Bruce
Kison (left) of Pittsburgh and Mike Flanagan of the hosting Baltimore
Orioles. As a rookie, Kison won the fourth game of the 1971 World Series
between the same two teams.

SOCCER
The undergraduate soccer club's perfect record was tarnished last
Wednesday evening as Michigan settled for a 1-1 double overtime tie with,
Michigan State af East 'Lansing.
The Wolverines, 5-0-1, led the Spartans, 1-0, at halftime on a goal by
junior Pablo Goic. Michigan State knotted the score midway through the'
second half on a disputedkpenalty kick. Two 10-minute overtime sessions
failed to break the deadlock.
With 15 minutes left in regulation, top performer Stefan Mitkov was
ejected from the contest, forcing the Wolverines to compete with 10 players
for the last 35 minutes.
Blue goaltender Dave Peress turned away 20 Spartan shots, while
Michigan unleashed 25 shots on goal.
The team hosts the University of Toledo Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. on the"
Tartan Turf, then travels to Rochester, Mich. Sunday to face Oakland
University.
The graduate soccer club's record slipped to 1.2 after a 5-1 road loss.
Saturday to the University of Detroit.
Captain Art Anderson scored a first-half goal, with an assist from Alan
MacSayden, as Michigan grabbed a 1-0 halftime lead. The Wolverines then
watched the Titans connect for five goals on the muddy, rain-soaked U-D
field.
Eastern Michigan visits Elbel Field Saturday for an 11 a.m. contest with "
the Blue grad booters.
RUGBY
Michigan, last year's conference champion which brought a 13-game
win streak into the 1979 season, saw its winless streak extended to three
Saturday as Miami (0.) fought the 'A' team to a 7-7 standoff at Elbel Field.
Senior Jack Goodman's 35-foot penalty goal with 30 seconds remaining
salvaged a tie for Michigan, 1-2-1, which trailed, 3-0, at halftime. Dave
Weber scored a try to put the Blue ruggers in front, 4-3, before the Redskins
added a try of their own to gain a 7-4 edge.
The 'B' team, 2-1-1, thumped Miami, 29-18, as Dan Shimpke scored nine
points and Jim Shetter eight. Joe Krieder and Tony Menyhart had four
apiece. ROWING
Michigan's scrimmage with Wayne State was postponed by Saturday's
nasty weather.
However, the Blue unit will participate in the Second Annual Head-of-
the-Thames Regatta in London, Ont. Saturday morning. Several teams from .{
Canada and the northern United States have been invited to compete.
SAILING
Last weekend the Michigan sailing team hosted the 14-team Cary-
Price Memorial.Regatta on Base Line Lake in Dexter.
Michigan's team, presently ranked first in the midwest, dominated both
'A' and 'B' divisions to win the regatta with 44 points (low points wins). Tufts
University, which won the event last year, was edged out of the top honors by
one point, with a total of 45 points. Boston University finished in a solid third
place with 59 points.

WASHINGTON GOOD BET TO REPEAT:

Bullets' lookirng strong in Atlantic

By BRAD GRAYSON
" A Daily Sport Analysis
t It's only early in October and NBA
players are already lacing up their
,hoes for what promises to be another
;xciting pro basketball season. This is
the time of the year every coach hails
his team as the one to watch during the
;course of the long season. The Atlantic
"Division looks like it will have one of the
nore interesting races with
:Philadelphia challenging Washington
'for the title.
WASHINGTON BULLETS
Coach Dick Motta's Bullets look like a
ood bet to repeat as Atlantic Division
, hamps. The acquisition of Kevin Por-
,er in the off-season will be a valuable
,asset to the Bullet's backcourt. Porter
pet an NBA record last year with 1,099
passists while playing for Detroit and
F'ets the ball up court as quick as
Fnyope in the league. If Phil Chenier
yomes back, successfully from surgery
ion his baclk, he will prove extremely
,valuable to the Bullets. Kevin Grevey,
Larry Wright, Charlie Johnson and a
grapidly-developing Roger Phegley fill
tout a deep and talented backcourt in
;Washington.
4 It's the awesome depth up front,
;however, that makes the Bullets go.
,Elvin Hayes, Bobby Dandridge and
-Wes Unseld combine muscle, finesse
.and scoring like few other front lines in
basketball.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS
The Sixers look like essentially the
same team as last year. The answer to
whether or not they can overtake
Washington appears to be in Doug
Collins shoes. Collins, an all-star-guard,
missed 35 games last year because of
C foot and ankle injuries. If he can stay
healthy, Philly could finally be a winner
at the end of the year.
? Teaming up with Collins in the back-
court will be Maurice Cheeks. Coming
off a good rookie year, Cheeks promises
w to be even better as a sophomore.
y Rookie Jim Spanarkle, free agent Billy
Ray Bates, Henry Bibby, Eric Money
r and Al Skinner round out a talented,
deep backcourt.
Julius Erving and Bobby Jones will
once again be at forwards with Cald-
well Jones and Darryl Dawkins sharing
time at center. Also like last year, Steve
Mix 'and Joe Bryant will fill in at for-
ward.'
BOSTON CELTICS
Boston has the most improved team

C_7 C7

in the division, Still that should only be
enough to climb over the Nets and
Knicks into third place. Coach Bill Fit-
ch just has too many question marks
this year for the Celtics to be con-
sidered a contender.
Dave'Cowens is the biggest question
mark. It is unknown whether he can
return to old form without the coaching
responsibilities this year. Also, can
Nate Archibald return to the form that
made him one of the NBA's top guards
a few years ago? And finally, will the
additions of rookie Larry Bird and M.
L. Carr at forwards be enough to vault
Boston over the Bullets and Sixers?
NEW JERSEY NETS
Coach Kevin Loughery is going to
have to get big help from rookie for-
wards Calvi Natt and Cliff Robinson if
the Nets are going to be good this
season. The loss of Bernard King should
make room for Robinson to take over at
power forward.
John Williamson, never afraid to
shoot, will provide scoring punch from
the backcourt and Ed Jordan filled in
well at point guard last year, but the
Nets don't have the dominating center
they would need to contend. At center,
George Johnson will get some help
from Rich Kelly, recently acquired
ALL
YOU
CAN
EAT
Tues: Lasagna
4.75
Wed: Fied Ch(icke
4.75
Thur: Smorgasbord
4.95
Includes: Soup-Salad-
Relsh Bar and Bread
a 114 EL
DOWNTOWN
Washington

from the Jazz in the trade for King, but
the Nets don't have the horses to
challenge anyone but the Knicks for the
cellar.
NEW YORK KNICKS
,This year under Red Holzman the
Knicks look like the pre-season
favorites for the cellar. The only real
bright spot for the Knicks appears to be
the addition of 7-1 rookie center Bill
Cartwright. Look for Cartwright to
replace ailing center Marvin Webster
in the pivot this season. Also rookies
Larry Demic and Sly Williams must
provide some needed punch.
Aging Earl Monroe and Jim
Cleamons will have to find some new
spark to get the backcourt going unless
Ray Williams and Mike Glenn can. Od-
ds are, they can't.

WORLD SERIES
W EEK Waterinq 3hole
4-AI.'1 4444 44 Nf44 MI
LI it jstaCeu .1.

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