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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1979 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COMBINES 31 YEARS OF STUDY
'U' professor has new theory on hyj

By BETH ROSENBERG
Thirty million Americans - 15 per
cent of the U.S. population - suffer
from some form of hypertension, and
half of them don't know it, according to

Dr. David Bohr, physiology professor
at the University Medical School.
Bohr has studied the causes of hyper-
tension, or high blood pressure, at the
University for 31 years and has
requested $3.7 million from the

Freshperson SAT

National Institute of Health so he can
continue hypertension research for
another five years. Bohr said his next
study, scheduled to begin in 1981, will
center on his latest hypothesis concer-
ning smooth muscle found surrounding
blood vessels.
BLOOD PRESSURE rises because
constriction of the blood vessels causes
increased resistance. The doctor ex-
plained that genetic abnormalities or
induced hormonal changes might affect
the smooth muscle and cause it to
become more excitable. When the cell
muscle becomes excited it contracts
more and causes increased resistance
to blood flow through the tube surroun-
ding the cell, according to Bohr.
"The hypothesis of basic abnor-

malities says that it (the abnormality)
is inherited and can be made to take
place in experimental animals or does
take place in humans exposed to kidney
damage or hormones," Bohr stated.
Bohr said if his hypothesis proves to
be correct, the next logical step in his
research is to find the nature of change
in the membrane and what causes the
change.
"ONCE WE find one answer, it will
open up new ones to be answered," he
said.
Hypertension is a general term en-
compassing several different diseases
which result in elevated blood pressure.
Hypertension can result from problems
involving the kidneys, hormones, diet,
or unknown causes.

Dogs, pigs, rab
genetic strain of hyp
been used in Bohr's
crease the blood p
perimental animals
used approaches
manipulation, chan
intake in the diet, a
tion.
Cures for kidn
hypertension are
surgery offers relief

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 9, 1979-Page7;
iertension
bits and a special some cases, Bohr said. He added that.
pertensive rats have some drugs, including diuretics, are ef-
experiments. To in- fective in lowering hypertension.
pressure in the ex- A person suffering from hypertension
s, Bohr successfully should see a physician, Bohr said. The
including kidney doctor will decide what type of hyper-
ages in the sodium tension the patient has.
and hormonal injec- "High blood pressure itself doesr't
hurt anything," Bohr explained. "Tbe
ey .and hormonal danger is the secondary effects of
available, while damaged blood vessels causing a stroke
F from the disease in or heart attack."

(Continued from Page 1)
There was little discussion by the
'Aculty concerning the possible in-
;Clusion of the ACT in University ad-
mnissions criteria. Gordus stressed that
the issue is currently under discussion,
and no action is planned until more in-
.ormation about the effectiveness of the
tests is obtained.
THERE WAS some concern ex-
pressed that neither the SAT nor the
ACT adequately measure a student's
ability to do college work.
DalaiLama
brings peace
message to
Ann Arbor
IContinued from Page 1)
The key to achieving inner peace, he
said, was in discovering "the nature of
the mind" and "the functions of con-
sciousness," in destroying con-
sciousness so that the true nature of the
mind would be revealed.
The Dalai Lama, launching into a
detailed, academic exposition on
Tibetan Buddhist meditation practices,
explained that meditation was the key
to breaking through one's con-
sciousness. In the short-term such inner
peace, he said, would provide one with
clear thinking, and more tranquilized
thoughts. In the long-term it would link
the individual with the essentially
common nature of all people, which
would then lead logically to a valuing of
speace and an end to selfishness, he said.
THE EXILED religious leader said
he felt that he and Pope John Paul II
shared "common ground."
"Christians and Buddhists have the
same basic emphasis on love. We are
the same in that we are working for the
benefit of humankind," he explained.
The Dalai Lama's visit to America is
seen by many as a result of changes
recently in Chinese-American
relations. Although for years he has
asked to tour the United States, he was
refused an entry visa, many say,
because his visit might have infuriated
Chinese officials.
Now that diplomatic relations with
China have been established, the State
Department felt secure in issuing a
visa.
The Dalai Lama particularly ex-
pressed a desire to visit Ann Arbor, af-
ter local architect Rich Ahearn began
corresponding with the exiled Tibetan
leader after a visit to his Dharmsala,
India refuge in 1971.

better
ECB Chairman Fader outlined the
success of the ECB program, which in-
cludes assessment of writipg skills of
incoming students, placement into ap-
propriate composition classes, and
research into the effects of the program
on writing ability.
Fader said that the program has met
with wide acclaim across the country.
English Prof. Richard Bailey, who is
responsible for the ECB research
program, said, "At no other com-
parable institution is an entire faculty
devoting such an effort to writing."
Both Bailey and Fader cited the ECB
Outreach program, in which University
professors. visit Michigan high schools
to help establish composition
programs, as widely praised and highly
successful.'

INGMAR BERGMAN'S

1956

THE SEVENTH SEAL (at 7 only)
Bergman proves again that the questions about the existence of God and man's
place in the universe can be filled, can be dramatic, and can be commercial.
A Knight returns home from the Crusades to find Europe ravaged by the
plague and plays a game of chess with Death. With MAX VON SYDOW.
The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter (at 9:05)
A girl who cherished a seemingly hopeless dream of becoming a concert
pianist meets two other people with lonely, circumscribed lives: a sensitive
deaf mute and an embittered black father. With ALAN ARKIN, CICELY TYSON
and STACY KEACH.

The AnnAd~r film CueperOe Presents at Aud. A: $1.50
Tuesday, October 9
THE 400 BLOWS
(Francois Truffaut; 1959) 7 & 10:20-AUD A
In 1957, a young film critic named Francois Truffaut was banned from the
Cannes Film Festival. In 1959 the some Truffaut won the Grand Prix with this
beautiful film of a boy unloved and unwanted at home who withdraws into a
private, then fugitive, existence. The film's ending is one of the most famous
in cinema. French with subtitles.
SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER
(Francois Truffaut, 1960) $:40 only-AUD A
Truffaut transformed the plot he found in a dime novel detective thriller into a
deeply personal examination of an artist's handling of success in this, his fun-
niest and most daring film. Marked by the brilliant photography of Raoul
Coutard and dazzling shifts in pace and mood, Shoot the Piano Player repre-
sents a high-point that Truffaut has yet to reach again. "Truffaut's film busts
out all over! "-Pauline Koel. French with subtitles.
TOMORROW'S SHOWING IS CANCELLED
DUE TO PRIOR BOOKING

CINEMA GUILD

$2.50 both
$1.50 each

OLD ARCH. AUD.

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