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October 05, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-05

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40

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 5, 1979-Page 3

DRAMA TIC PLO CHANGES A PREREQUISITE:
Dayan hints PLO-Israel talks

From The Associated Press
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan has dropped a broad hint that
Israel might speak to the Palestine
Liberation Organization (PLO), but
only to negotiate a solution to the
lestinian refugee problem.
However, Dayan has a list of further
conditions for Israel-PLO talks that he
acknowledges would require a
r6VOlutionary change in the PLO's
character.
-Although Dayan announced no shift
in Israeli policy, he has made a series of
pronouncements this year signaling a
willingness to consider a dramatic new
approach in the future.
IIS SOFTENED tone comes partly in
response to increasing pressure from
Weistern European governments and
private American groups hoping to
sponsor mutual Israel-PLO recognition
and a breakthrough toward an overall
Mideast peace.

Until now, Israel has flatly ruled out
talking to the PLO under any circum-
stances, and even rejects mediation at-
,tempts, such as that by the American
black leader, the Rev. Jesse Jackson,
who is on a Midwest tour now.
Jackson met with Palestinian
guerrilla leader Yasser Arafat yester-
day, seven hours after being released
from a hospital where he was treated
for a stomach ailment.
Leftist sources said Arafat met with
the Palestine Liberation Organization
Executive Committee before going into
the session with the American black ac-
tivist. The report could not be confir-
med immediately.
JACKSON, ARAFAT, and his aides
were rushed into a small conference
room bedecked with photographs of the
guerrilla leader and one of the Iranian
revolutionary leader, Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini. Arafat and
Jackson posed for photographers but
made no comments.

Jackson was expected to seek a
"document" from Arafat, outlining
basic PLO objectives. He wants the
PLO to renounce terrorism and
repudiate clauses in its charter calling
for the destruction of Israel and the
establishment of a secular, democratic
state.
PLO SOURCES say the Jackson
meeting with Arafat is not likely to
result in any major changes in PLO
policy, since revisions could not be
made without the approval of the 390-
member Palestine National Council.
Dayan said in a television interview
Wednesday: "Should an Arab
organization arise - even if it were the
PLO itself - at some future stage and
without engaging in terror to proceed to
deal with solving the refugee issue, and
if Israel were requested to take part in

the solution, in my opinion, she should
do so."
In an apparently contradictory
statement, Dayan also said, "even if
the PLO fulfills the necessary con-
ditions, I would not recommend nor
support a dialogue with them."
Dayan's aides had a hard time ex-
plaining the contradictions. They said
Dayan was responding to hypothetical
questions about Israel's response if the
PLO recognized Israel. Dayan still
believes that is not possible, they said.
SECOND
CHO NCE
995-5350

Student government heads
form campus-wide coaliton

OT SU

(Continued from Page 1)

ning faculty appointments as well as
tepure decisions.
]Mark Garman, School of Education
representative, said it was his under-
standing that certain Regental by-laws
precluded student members on such
committees from voting.
On the other hand, Public Health
representative Jim Murphy noted his
s ool's Executive Committee had two
voting student members. "It's quite a

prestigious committee to be on," he
said. "It's a high power position."
Also attending the meeting were
Michael Banar from the School of Den-
tistry; Rosa Ohno, Nursing; Laura
Lisideki, Engineering; Steve
Polarowzki, Pharmacy; Ron Borker,
Natural Resources; Kathy Faranski,
Social Work; Bob Milbrath, Rackham;
Buck Nordby, Law; Sherri Goodman,
Law; Steve Anderson, Medicine; and
Ron Booth, Economics. -

OT

0

DAY,
IDAY,

NOT TUESDAY

NOT WE

ES DAY,

UAW

Ford settle;

beat late deadline

NOT THURSDAY,
NOT FRIDAY,

(Continued from Page 1)
ORD, BECAUSE of its smaller
roiluction capacity, has relied on over-
in a more than General Motors Corp.
Ven with 24,000 Ford workers on in-
efinite furlough, the union complains
at many plants are still requiring ex-
ensive overtime and would like to see
aid off workers shifted to those plants.
Fraser said the bargaining could be
wrapped up quickly if Ford made "the
right decisions."
Another unsolved issue was believed
to be the schedule of paid days off,
which at GM will totay 25 over the next
three years, compared to 12 in the last
two years.
THE UAW WAS believed to be trying
to schedule the days off between now
and the expiration of a new three-year
contract, rather than in the 1980, 1981
and 1982 calendar years, as at GM.
The union also revealed Wednesday
night that it sought to rearrange Ford's
ecdnomic offer, an offer patterned on

the GM settlement. The
rearrangement, Bannon said, would not
increase the package, but he did not
elaborate.
Observers speculated that a
rearrangement might reduce
somewhat the schedule of heavy pen-
sion increases over the next three years
granted by GM, in order to devote more
money to wage increases for Ford's
skilled workers and increase the pay
differential between them and workers
with less skill.
The GM settlement continues the in-
dustry's traditional pay formula of
three per cent annual wage increases
plus protection against inflation. The
union said the formula would increase
an assembler's pay from $8.67 an hour
before the new GM contract to $11.32 an
hour in June 1982 if inflation ran eight
per cent a year. Ford workers get about
the same pay as GM workers.

of

4.

,

'a s
FILMS
Mediatries-Millhouse: A White Comedy, 7, 8:30, 10 p.m., Nat. Sci.
auditorium.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Midnight Express, 7, 9 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Gargoyle Films-Enter the Dragon, 7, 9 p.m., Hale Auditorium, Business
School.
dinema II - Stavisky, 7, 9:10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
'Alternative Action-The Big Sleep, 7, 9:30 p.m., Aud. 4, MLB.
Cinema Guild-The Asphalt Jungle, 7,9:15 p.m., Old Arch. Auditorium.
MEETINGS
Arbor Alliance-Film "More Nuclear Power Plants", 7, 8, 9 p.m.
Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 S. Fifth.
PERFORMANCES
Pendleton Arts Center-Crowfoot Press, poetry reading with Andrew
Carrigan, Rochelle Siegel, Robert Clifford, Simone Juda Press. 8 p.m., 2nd
floor, Michigan Union.
r'Professional Theater Program - "Show Boat", 8 p.m., Power Center.
'School of Music-Susan Matheke and Willie Feuer, faculty dance concert, 8
p.m., Dance Building.
'.School of Music-University Symphony Band, H. Robert Reynolds, con-
ductor, 8 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
SPEAKERS
South and South East Asian Studies/Asian Studies-Bernardito Operario,
"American Advertising and Filipino Taste Formation During the Pre-War
Years, 3-5 p.m., Lane Hall Commons.
Wholistic Health Council-John Schneider, "Loss and Grief," 7:30 p.m.,
Wesley Lounge, 602 E. Huron.
MISCELLANEOUS
Union Gallery-"Upper Peninsula Artists", traditional and functional
pieces by Ralph Wolfe, Gladys Wonnacott and Gordon Goehring, through
Nov. 4, 1st floor, Michigan Union.
Guild House Luncheor -"Mirage", a teaching and performing dance
collective, noon, 802 Monroe.
Visitors Night, Astronomy Department-"Mysterious Spiral Galaxies,"
"--j ...,.,a.. --T"l Iff~I.. 0l .13A- - Air L2. A1 rnl Acl

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THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "SATURDAY ONLY" BARGAINS:

SAVE $48
SANSUI AM/FM STEREO
RECEIVER SALE PRICED!
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Tuning meter. FM stereo indi-
cator. Tape monitor. Reg. $127.
$9

SAVE $67.88
TECHNICS SA200 25-WATT
AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER
25 watt/ch., min. RMS 8 ohms,
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than 0.04% THD. Reg $196.88.
s 129

AUTO PROGRAM SEARCH
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SHARP RT-1144
DOLBY CASSETTE DECK
Front-load. Automatic program
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SAV E $50.88
PIONEER CT-F650
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Front-loading DC servo motor.
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$1 19

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SPEAKER SYSTEM
Big 8" woofer and 1.4" tweeter.
Walnut enclosure with fabric
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I SAVE $21.88
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89

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Excellent sound reproduction
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SAVE $23.73
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With grilles, cables. Reg. $69,88.
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EA.

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