100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-I

LOW COST
COOPERATIVE s CHILD CARE
Two full-time coordinators;
Half days available.
CORNTREE, 1910 Hill
Hrs: 8-5:30; CALL 994-4513
PART-TIME
- STUDENTS &
TEACH ERS
MEN, WOMEN.
ALL AGES.
$500 commission per month to
start possible. Part-time for follow-
ing up thousands of inquiries about
the world-renowned Encyclopedia
Brittania.
ALSO IN-STORE SALES
For interview,,
call Mr. Sultini
569-0575
An equal opportunity employer,

Paqe 2-Sunday, September 30, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Kcinichfaces close race in
Cleveland's mayoral primary

-J

CLEVELAND (AP) - Dennis
Kucinich, the scrappy mayor whose
two years in office have embroiled him
in bitter fights over the city's-tottering
finances and his abrasive leadership
style, will be judged by the voters
Tuesday in a non-partisan mayoral
primary.
Five candidates are vying for the
$50,000-a-year job and voters will
narrow the field to two for the Nov. 6
general election.
Kucinich, whose 33rd birthday is on
Oct. 8, survived a recall attempt by
only 236 votes a year ago. Last fall, he
was sidelined for five weeks with an
ulcer-in part becaue of the hectic pace
of his former 18-hour days. The city also
has failed twice to meet loan payment
deadlines, with a third default looming
next Saturday.

POLLS SHOW him running a strong,
second to Lt. Gov. George Voinovich.
Voinovich, 48, is a Republican.
Kucinich is a Democrat who unseated
veteran Mayor Ralph Perk in 1977
without party support. Others in the
race are Democrats Basil Russo, 32,
majority leader of the City Council; and
state Sen. Charles Butts, 37; and
machine press operator Thabo Ntweng,
31, a candidate of the Socialist Workers
Party.
"It's a referendum on Dennis," said
Cuyahoga County Democratic Chair-
man Timothy Hagan. "What you are
going to have is Dennis being judged by
the voters in the primary."
Hagan said the race is too close to call
because of the uncertainty about the
turnout. Of the 290,000 registered
voters, polls show at least one-third
have yet to make up their mind.
ROBERT HUGHES, chairman of the
county Republican organization, said
he is sure the runoff wiill feature
Voinovich and Kucinich.
Kucinich has focused his campaign
entirely on Voinovich and has often
discussed, without apologizing, his out-
spoken, often acrimonious style.
"All I had to do in the last two years
to gain the favor of the media, the
praise of editors, the laurels of the
Growth Association was to remain
silent . . . and keep my lips sealed as
dozens of dirty deals danced across my

desk," Kucinich said yesterday in his
only debate with his challengers.
"If I had done these things I wouldn't
be here this afternoon facing an uphill
battle against the quiet onslaught of
corrupt corporatepowers secretly fun-
neling cash into the campaign of the
Republican, in order to steal back the
city quietly, like thieves in the night."
KUCINICHI SAYS his problems were
inherited and that he needs two more
years to turn around the industrialized
Lake Erie-port city of 600,000 residents.
Voinovich, who attacked Kucinich for
discord in government promises an
administration of cooperation and
maturity.
"You'll hear noise from City Hall, but
it will be constructive noise, useful
noise-the noise of mature, experien-
ced, professional city officials going tok
bat for every single resident of
Cleveland," Voinovich said.
Similarly, Butts and Russo have been
focusing on Kucinich and on bread-and-
butter issues such as clean streets and
beefed up police protection.
Ntweng, who is viewed as completely
out of the running, has nonetheless won
applause with his jibes at the other
candidates.
"No one has professed to be the frien-
ds of anyone," Ntweng says.
"Bickering means nothing to us-the
people."

"WHERE DO OUR RIGHTS
COME FROM?"
Lecturer James Spencer, C.S.B.
OCT 2,12:15 pm Michigan League
Sponsored by the Christian Science Organization

CLEVELAND MAYOR Dennis Kucinich will be opposed by four other candi-
dates for mayor in Tuesday's nonpartisan primary. The two top vote getters
will face each other in a run-off election for mayor on Nov. 6.
Carter, Portillo end
talks on pollution, oil

(Continued from Page 1Y
Carter administration negotiators
would press Mexico to pay for damage
caused to the U.S. shoreline by the
recent oil well accident. Mexico has
resisted such suggestions so far, and
Carter has conceded publicly that no in-
ternational agreement exists that
would force Mexico to pay.
At the conclusion of two days of talks
here, both Carter and Lopez Portillo
were 'smiling and saying they were
pleased with the outcome.
Their final, 90-minute session in the
White House also covered the Middle
East, Cuba, the U.S.-Soviet strategic
arms limitation treaty, long-term
prospects for U.S. purchase of Mexican
oil, and cross-border sales of elec-
tricity.

I

0, 0
ERIC'S
FACTORY OUTLET
Warmups-40% off
Women's Jog Shoes
PUMA-TIGERS $1S-$20
Women's BANCROFTS $10.95
2 pair for $20
Men's BROOKS $12.95
SPEEDOS $9.00
Leotard & Tight Sets $9.25
40" Rain Jacket $16.95
White Stag Vests - Ir'S
were $65 now $35.95
Rain Poncho-side snaps $1.75
Plaid Shirts $8-$12
Baconta T-Necks
were $ i9.5o'now 510.50
406 E. Liberty- 663-6771
2 blocks off State St.

WHITE HOUSE spokesman Jerrold
Schecter said the two presidents spoke
for less than 10 minutes about Cuba, but
he refused to say whether Lopez Por-
tillo had agreed with Carter's position
that the presence of a Soviet combat
brigade on the Caribbean island is
unacceptable. The Mexicans are
believed to be far less concerned about
the matter than the Carter ad-
ministration, however.
The closest thing to a solid agreement
that came out-of Lopez Portillo's visit,
his second to the United States during
Carter's presidency, was the anti-
pollution accord.
A joint statement issued after the
final session said the two leaders
"agreed on the need for both countries
to prevent actions on one side of the
land or maritime boundary from
degrading the environment on the other
side. They''also instructed their ad-
ministrations to give 'a high priority to
such questions."
CARTER AND Lopez Portillo asked
their negotiators to report on whether
an anti-pollution agreement "is
possible or appropriate," the statement
said.t
There has been concern in the United
States not only over the highly
publicized oil spill, but also over such
less familiar problems as the* New
River, a polluted stream which flows
northward across the border.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
r (USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 22
Sunday, September 30, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornin
during the University year at 42
Maynard Street Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); 13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

U

r

"I

JPSI1LOVE YOU
Fortress Woman
walls besieged
open your gates
to the juggler
I am the fool
who knows of nought:
teach me why
days taste of honey
tears of old wine
and I will make known
wisdom
I, the wanderer,I
I have been nowhere;
let us travel
beyond all walls
wind between abysses
cow-dotted slopes
until scrambling, we stand
above the cloud-piercing mountains
I ask no handouts
have no wealth:
draw me welled waters
f..A.,oknA nr rm e

I

I

N

THE

MOR

N

I

N

G

ANN ARBOR'S
PAPER DELIVE
DOOR BEFORE
dn E U m - A'= J' ,rda

ONLY MORNING NEWS-
RS TO YOUR DORM OR
8:00AM TUESDAY-SUNDAY
rl i.r rauu- r - ~7F- A £7FFO -i{\'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan