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September 27, 1979 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-27

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aoge 8-Thursday, September 27, 1979-The Michigan Daily
BL UE DEFENSE TOPS IN CONFERENCE

QBs top Big Ten leaders

A MEFF
Is
ENOUGH

CHsICAGO (AP) - Tailback Steve
Smith of Michigan State, quarterback
Mark Herrmann of Purdue and quar-
terback Art Schlichter of Ohio State are

0

the individual leaders this week in the
Big Ten all-games statistical race.
Smith took over from Garry White of
Minnesota in a torrid race for the
rushing lead. Smith is averaging 102.7
yards a game to 101.7 for White and
100.7 for Illinois' Mike Holmes.
HERRMANN IS the passing leader
on a grading system. He has completed
48 passes for 640 yards while Tim Clif-
ford of Indiana is second and Bert
Vaughn of Michigan State third.
Schlichter leads in total offense
averaging 223.0 yards a game to 201.0
for Herrmann.
Ray Smith of Purdue leads in pass
receiving with 14 for 241 yards while
Holmes, Dave Young of Purdue, Dennis
Mosley of Iowa and Calvin Murray of
Ohio State are tied for the scoring lead
with 30 points each. Morten Andersen of
Michigan State is the kick-scoring
leader with 26 points.
DEREK HUGHES of Michigan State
is first in kickoff returns with an
average of 36.3 and Anthony Carter of
Michigan leads in punt returns with a
17.9 average closely followed by Mike
Guess of Ohio State at 17.2.
Ray Stachowicz of Michigan State is
first in punting with a 43.2 average
followed by Tom Orosz of Ohio State at
42.9. Bill Kay of Purdue is the intercep-
tion leader with three.
Michigan dominates in team
statistics. The Wolverines lead in seven
of the eight departments.
THE WOLVERINES lead in rushing
with an average of 255.3 yards to 237.3
for Ohio State; in total offense with
420.0 yards to 406.3 for Michigan State

Car Yid
Wysocki, Maryland ............84 47
Sherlock, Navy ................ 50 28
Dickey, Texas A&M............75 40
Hadnot, Texas Tech............82 38
Lewis, Virginia Tech ........... 60 38
Jones, Texas................ 23 12:
Taylor, Virginia.............54 36
Mordica, Vanderbilt............42 24
McDougid. Wake Forest........74 36
Hipp, Nebraska ................ 42 24
Leading Passers
Att Cum Yds
Broomell, Temple ....... 55 36 634
Herrmann, Purdue ...... 70 48 640
Clifford, Indiana..........58 41 547
Hutsell, E. Tenn..........74 47 566
St. John, Harvard.........17 10 153
Campbell, Calif..........98 72 787
McMichael, Rutgers .....59 36 474
Schonert, Stanford........62 38 321
Straeter, Tenn............39 20 327
Total Offense

ds
78
81
5
8
1
25
7
3
3
41

Avg
5.7
5.6
5.4
4.7
6.3
5.4
6.8
5.8
4.9
5.7

PG
159.3
140.5
135.0
129.3
127.0
125.0
122.3
121.5
121.0
120.5

and in scoring with 32.7 points per game
to 32.3 for Ohio State. Purdue is the
passing leader with 231.7 yards a game
to 197.0 for Michigan State.
The Wolves lead in all four defensive
categories. They have allowed 86.3 yar-
ds per game rushing to 103.7 for
Michigan State; 71.0 yards passing to
287.3 for Michigan State and 8.7 points
per game to 16.3 for Indiana.
NCAA INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
By The Associated Press
Leading Rushers

ART SCHLICH TER, Ohio State's out-
standing junior quarterback, leads the
Big Ten in total offense, averaging 223
yards per game. Schlichter's average is
tops in the conference followed by Pur-
due's Mark Herrmann with an average
of 201 yards per game. On a national
basis after three weeks of play,
Schlichter ranks .seventh in total offen-
se with 669 total yards gained, and a per
gain average of 8.2 yards. Herrmann,
incidentally, ranks second nationally in
the leading passers department.
Ohio State (3-0) comes off a victory
last weekend over Washington State
and travels west this weekend where
Schlichter will start against the Bruins
of UCLA (2-1).

Tds
7
8
4
4
1
2
2
3
3.
Avg
5.8
5.9
10.1
6.1
5.5
4.9
8.2
5.1
4.8
4.9

Luther, San Jose St...............
Campbell, Calif ...............
BroomellTemple............
Venuto, Wake Forest..........
Wilson, Brigham Young........
Hontas, Tulane ..................
Schlichter, Ohio St...............
Davis, Wyoming ..............
Richardson, Oregon St........
Brown, Aplchin St............
Receiving
Beasley, Aplchin St..............
Coury, Oregon St.................
Scott. Georgia...............
Carson, LSU .......... ......
Jones, Tenn St................

Yds
761
742
734
727
481
687
669
663
651
636

OmPg
189.7
171.7
162.3
142.9
142.1
139.5
132.9
131.7
131.7
PG
253.7
247.3
l244.7
242.3
240.5
229.0
223.0
221.0
217.0
212.0
ds PG
12 6.7
93 6.7
97 6.0
89 6.0
'7 5.7

Gm Ct
3 20
3 20
2 12
2 12
3 17

Y
3
2
18

By Billy Neff
Pros not for everyone.
... but Hardy prepared
W ,HEN JAMES NAISMITH was toying with a peach basket in the
nineteenth century and called his invention basketball, he had no
idea what a no-cut contract was, what an 11-player limit was or what a
hardship would be.
Nor did Naismith have any idea that his invention would have important
glass repercussions. "It's (basketball's) a means of getting out of the ghetto;
it's a means to an end," said Detroit Pistons' basketball coach Dick Vitale.
Naismith did not know his invention would turn college into merely a
stepping stone to fame and fortune. Who can forget what high school super-
star Ralph Sampson said when he decided to enter the University of
Virginia. "I will turn pro after two years here."
' Sampson's case and the example of Johnny Robinson, former Michigan
standout forward all fall into the same category. When Robinson was
waived by the LosAngeles Lakers, he dejectedly said, "now I'll go to work in
the steel mills."
Yes, basketball is a means of getting out of the ghetto-but it is not the
only means. Athletes often forget this fact and they also forget that everyone
can't be a professional athlete. Being a professional is an ambitious goal, but
it is not the cure all or end all. Let me illustrate this point.
Former Michigan starting forward Alan Hardy is trying out with the
Pistons. Hardy has survived rookie camp and has made it to the final 15
players. Unfortunately for "City Al," he does know the meaning of the terms
Naismith didn't know.
Hardy knows the meaning of these words because they are cutting into
his chances of fulfilling a lifelong dream of playing professional basketball.
Due to the fact that many Pistons have no-cut contracts, a lot of players are
almost guaranteed spots on the Pistons' roster. In addition, the 11-player limit
does not allow for Hardy to have much of a chance of playing with the
Pistons.
"It is obvious to the naked eye that the odds are against him. He is faced
with a tremendous dilemma," said Vitale.
Hardy, on the other hand, says, "I think my chances are pretty good.
Thaings are not going as well as I would like them to for myself. I'm trying to
adapt to coming into the NBA," added Hardy.
When asked what he would do if he did not make the Pistons, Hardy
declared, "I'm not going to talk about that yet. But I think another team
would pick me up."
Let's say, just perchance, Hardy does not make the Pistons and another
team does not add him to their roster (I hope this doesn't happen because
I've always been a big fan of Hardy's). What would he do?
Alan Hardy, you can bet, will meet success with his life. As a very in-
telligent graduate in communications, Hardy will be able to find a job
somewhere. But not all athletes that matriculate here, Black or White, are
as intelligent as Hardy, and most are not.
However, many of the athletes who pass through Michigan do envision
professional sports at the end of the tunnel. "In 95 per cent of all cases, they
(the athletes) are going to come in thinking pro. It's pretty natural; society
breeds that in our athletes," commented Jim Betts, former academic advisor
to athletes at Michigan, now residing in Boston.
"I was in pretty much the same boat with football. If you spent most of
your life playing a sport, it is a natural goal. Then, if you don't make it, you
ask yourself, what do you do now,".Betts said.
"If an athlete looks at any major institution with a reputation in
athletics, he says, 'I stand a damn good chance of playing professional foot-
ball or basketball'," Betts points out.
Betts agrees, though, that professional sports is not the cure all
especially since "less than 1 per cent make it in football, for example. The
odds areincredibly tremendous. There's just too much talent out there,"
continued Betts.
The obvious question, then, is when do the players come to grips with
this reality. "After they've been here two or three years, then they may
realize they're not going to make it in professional sports. In most cases, it is
a rude awakening," Betts concluded.
This article is not an indictment of the Michigan system, but instead of
the psychology of the Michigan athlete. He should realize both that at any
time, he could be injured or that less than 1 per cent of college football
players make it professionally.
I believe academic counselor George Hoey when he says, "there is an
emphasis stressed to make sure that the students graduate while they are
here."
Athletes should look at Hardy, when they start only seeing themselves as
professional athletes. "When I came here, I wasn't thinking professionally.
One of my goals was to complete school and I did." They should keep open a
diverse fild of goals.
If more athletes thought like Hardy and listened to Betts, in the
figurative sense, the Ralph Sampsons of the world would not join the Johnny
Robinsons in the steel mills. You see, Mr. Naismith, everything doesn't
always turn out peachy keen.

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PIONEER HIGH FACES LAWSUIT:

Golfer alleges sex bias

By DAN CONLIN
The Ann Arbor Board of Education
and the varsity golf coach at Pioneer
High School have been named as defen-
dants in a sex discrimination suit filed
by a woman who competed on the 1978
Pioneer golf team.
Pamela Othen, a senior at the school,
filed a $125,000 suit in federal court
Sept.- 21. The suit charges golf coach
Tom Wilson with cutting her from the
squad because of her sex.
In the suit, Othen coutends she scored
better in the August team tryouts than
seven players who were chosen for this
year's squad. Wilson said he based his
decision to cut Othen on more than just
her scores. The suit states that Wilson

cut Othen "to make
sophomores to play."
Wilson, when reached fo
on the case, said lie had be
remain silent on the matter.
however, say that Othen's a
"unsatisfactory."
Othen's attorney; Jack F
not to ask the court for a res
der which would force Wils
Othen on the team. Kini
withheld the order in hope1
would voluntarily allow Oth(
Among the damages for w
has filed suit is an award o
compensatory damage for h

room for "fall-ride" golf scholarship to an in-
terested college or university. The suit
also demands an award of $50,000 as
r comment punitive damages for "deliberate and.
en asked to willful violation" of the Elliot-Larsen
Wilson did, Civil Rights Act, the ,Michigan School
ttitude was Code, and the Public Accommodations
Act.
King, chose Last year, Othen played in one match
training or- for the Pioneers. Over the summer, she
on to place captured the women's championship at
g said she the Ann Arbor Country Club, as well as
that Wilson the Southeastern Michigan Junior Girls
en to play. Championship.
hich Othen But Wilson isn't so "hooked" on
f $25,000 as Othen's ability. When Othen's father
er loss of a questioned his decision not to place his
daughter on the squad, Wilson replied,

Grildde,
P*icks
Pick the winning teams for this wee*
from the Griddes list and win a one item
pizza from Pizza Bob's. All Gridde
choices must be delivered to 420
Maynard by 12 p.m. on Friday. So don't
forget to do your Griddes.
1. MICHIGAN at California
(pick score)
2. Michigan St. at Notre Dame
3. Ohio St. at UCLA
4. Oregon at Purdue
5. Northwestern at Minnesota
6. Wisconsin at San Diego St.
7. Navy at Illinois
8. Iowa St. at Iowa
9. Colorado at Indiana
10. Shippensburg at Slippery Rock
(Ann Arbor)
11. Columbia at Lafayette
12. Southern Cal at LSU
13. Miami (O) at Central Michigan
14. Penn State at Nebraska
15. Pittsburgh at Temple
16. Texas at Missouri
17. Georgia at South Carolina
18. Wake Forest at N. Carolina St.
19. Auburn at Tennessee
20. Detroit School Board at DAILY
LIBELS

I

rm mmm mmm m m mm mm m - - mmm -mmi4
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Now Delivering to the N. Campus Area
I BELL'S GREEK PIZZAI
995-0232 1
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"She loses fifty yards off the tee.."
Judge Charles Joiner, who is han-
dling the case, has yet to arrange a date
for the hearing.

RACE MAKES NO DIFFERENCE

Vitale only worried about injuries

Welcome Students
TO THE
DASCOLA
HAIRSTYLISTS
Liberty off State-668-9329
East U. at South U.-6612-0354
Arborland-971-9975
Maple Village-761-2733

By BILLY NEFF
There is an interesting sidelight in the
Detroit Pistons camp at Crisler Arena
- there are no white players in camp.
Even the referees for the Piston
scrimmages are all black !
Fortunately, Pistons' Coach Dick
Vitale doesn't seem to preoccupy him-
self with these matters. "The Red
Wings are all white. We're approaching
the 1980s. I always felt in my heart that
people are people. I'd like to think
people are judged by their ability,"
Vitale said.
"All I'm interested in is does. a team
give an honest effort; that's all that
counts," adds the second-year mentor.

VITALE, ALWAYS the philosopher,
lapses off into his famous analogies.
"Why is the black athlete dominating
as much as he is: I look at my kids -
suburbanites. You've got your country
club, your tennis club. I can take you
down to the inner city at midnight. Kids
are playing with torn sneakers. It's a
way of life. It's a religion."
It is easy for Vitale to accept the last
situation but not as easy for him to ac-
cept his present injury situation.
"Basically, it's a situation where we're
experiencing so many minor, nagging
injuries. You can't get a true picture of
your progress," opined Vitale.
"We have to find out real quick
(about the team). We have so many

THE MOUNTAIN PARKA

young players. Can they do it Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday? In college,
you play Tuesday, slap hands Wed
nesday and Thursday, and then play
again on Saturday. Here, you have to'
have the ability to do it consistently,"
continued Vitale.
WHEN VITALE referred to the
younger players, he had in mind first
round draft picks Gregory Kelser,
UCLA's Roy Hamilton, Michigan's own
Phil Hubbard, other draftees Earl
Evans, Terry Duerod, Tony Price and.
free agents Alan Hardy and Stan'
Joplin, of Milan.
According to Vitale, "It doesn't take
a genius to figure out a veteran will be -
out of a job." He must have in mind
Terry Tyler, Leon Douglas or John
Shumate.
Whatever happens, Vitale, always
candid and engaging, has as the bum-
per sticker says, "reVitaleized the.
Pistons." In just his second year as the
leader of the perennial dormats in
professional basketball, he has made
the Pistons a playoff contender. But if
they start winning, his philosophizing
won't be as much fun.

. . .,.

PITCHER
NIGHT

UNLINED & WOOL LINED

r
~~ (

MOUNTAIN PARKAS
in men and women's sizes

ABSOLUTELY
THE LAST CALL

7 nm f^'lU Ini nr,'I

i

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