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September 23, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-23

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; o EENrV'CL WAfN

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 23, 1979-Page 3
Young: EconomicS
issue for the 80's

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
LUNCH-DISCUSSION--12 NOON
"Appalachia: America's 'Third World'?"
The REVEREND ROBERT DAVIS
Director Sunset Gap Community Center
Newport, Tennessee
AT THE
International Center, 603 E. Madison St.
Co-sponsored by the Ecumenical Campus Center
Lunch-$1.00 For information: 662-5529

K

Go on and roll
the dice
The modern' version of Mark
Twain's famous line about not
letting his education get in the
way of his learning is found in the
new LSA Student Government
handbook: "The most effective
way of dealing with the higher
education experience is to deal
with the college experience as if
you are 'playing a game." To
familiarize LSA students with the
rules, LSA-SG has come out with
"Michigopoly," a booklet of-
fering a game plan explaining
resources, grades, ex-
tracurricular activities and
college quirks. The Monopoly
takeoff is available in the LSA
Building.

j
I
4
...
. , . .

From AP and UPI
On his last official day as the U.N.
ambassador, Andrew Young said
yesterday the U.S. has more to fear
from its economic competitors than
from the Soviet Union and predicted
that "national economic security" will
be the big issue of the 1980s.
Young reported to President Carter
on his recent trade mission to 10
African nations, saying that the journey
resulted in $1.5 billion in business for
American firms and the total could ex-
pand to $2.5 billion in a couple of years.
"The results were extraordinary,"
Carter told Young.
On his trip, Young criss-crossed the
continent in a gleaming Air Force 707,
hobnobbing with heads of state and
filling local headlines. He looked like a
man making a triumphant farewell
tour.
He was garbed in the cloak of an
Ashanti chief in Ivory Coast and of a
Moslem noble in Nigeria, he was
decorated with the Star of Africa in
Liberia. Tanzania's Julius Nyerere
greeted him fondly as "Andy" and
Cameroonians lined the streets to catch
a glimpse.
This was the vintage Andy Young
using his blend of charisma, frankness,
preaching and politics to guide a
delegation of two dozen American
businessmen through some of Africa's,
most economically promising
republics, selling American technology
and know-how as the "cheapest and
best."
It was also Young the free-lancing
diplomat, telling somewhat surprised

African presidents it was "ridiculous"
that they do not talk to Israel, and
grating on some State Department ner-
ves by saying Soviet troops in Cuba
"haven't bothered me at all" and that
the pro-Soviet Angolan government
should have been recognized long ago.
His traveling style had not changed
much from his first visit to Africa as
U.N. ambassador, in February 1977.
On his return, Young focused on trade
issues, declining to answer most other
questions.

"'

w''

Blue fat cats
The three universities most frequently mentioned by high-level
execs in major companies when asked where they took their graduate
work were New York University, the University of Michigan, and the
Michigan of the East, Harvard University. A composite "profile" of
corporate movers and shakers developed by an executive search firm
and the UCLA Graduate School of Management confirms that those
who climb to the top and become executive v.p.'s, senior v.p.'s, group
v.p.'s, functional v.p.'s and corporate specialists at those big, big
companies which make the "Fortune 500" and "Fortune 50" lists are
often products of the University. Asked how they Made It, they told
researchers that the following traits contributed: concern for results
(74 per cent), integrity (66 per cent), and desire for responsibility (58
per cent). Among the traits less often mentioned: creativity (45 per
cent), ambition (38 per cent), and aggressiveness (36 per cent).
Writing
If you're a student and want to learn how to become a more
skillful writer-or just need help putting together a particular
paper-drop by the English Composition Board Workshop in 1025
Angell Hall Mondays, 10-12, 1-5; Tuesdays, 9-12, 1-5; Wednesdays, 9-12,
1-5, 7-9; Thursdays, 9-12,,1-5, or; Fridays, 9-12, 1-5 for free assistance.
If you're an instructor who wants to learn how to improve your ability
to teach writing, meet with Daniel Fader, chairman of composition
board, and Jay Robinson, chairman of the English Department, for a
seminar on the five Tuesdays in October from 4 to 6 p.m. in room 2553
of the LSA Building. The seminar is intended to improve the instruc-
tors' writing and to prepare them for the new LSA Upperlevel Writing
requirement.
Happenings
SUNDAY
FILMS
Cinema I-Pierrot Le Fou, 7 p.m. only; Masculine/Feminine,
9 p.m.-only, Aud. 4, MLB.
MEETINGS
Hiking Club-1:30 p.m., Rackham, N.W. entry on E. Huron.
PERFORMANCES
Village Bell-"Another Roadside Attraction," local country-rock
band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
SPEAKERS
Gay Discussion Group-Representatives from the Michigan
Organization for Human Rights, "The Gay Civil Rights Movement in
Michigan," 6 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Continuing Education for Nurses/Educational Services-Alvin
Toffler, "Education of the Health Profession of the Future," 7 p.m.,
Rackham.
EXHIBITS
Mich. Museum of Art-Canadian Inuit (Eskimo) art, 1-5 p.m.,
State at S. University.
Michigan Union Arts-Open house, noon-6 p.m., Union.
Artists and Craftsmen Guild-Fall Art Fair, noon-6 p.m., Union
grounds.
MISCELLANEOUS
Mich. Media Resources Center-Poets Talking (T.V. broadcast),
6:30a.m., WJBK-TV.
Mich. Media Resources Center-The Dickens World (T.V. broad-
cast), 7 a.m., WDIV-TV.
Hillel-Rosh Hashanah Services; Conservative service, 9 a.m.,
Power Center; Orthodox service, 9 a.m., Hillel.
MONDAY
MEETINGS
Faculty Women's Club-Annual welcoming parties for incoming
women faculty members or wives of faculty members, 8 p.m., several
locations. Call 662-5577 for information.
Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin
America-"Solidarity With the Nicaraguan Revolution," 7:30 p.m.,
International Center lounge.
Indoor Light Gardening Society-8 p.m., Matthaei Botanical Gar-
dens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd.
PERFORMANCES
Carillon Recital-Hudson Ladd, carillonneur, 7 p.m., Burton
Tower.
Musical Society-Juliard Quartet, 8:30 p.m., Rackham.
SPEAKERS
Dept. of Chemistry-Dr. James O'Reilly, "FTIR Spectroscopy
and Calorimetry of the Amorphous State," 4 p.m., 3005 Chem. Bldg.
Spartacus Youth League-Mary Jo McAllister, "For Workers
Revolution In Iran," 7:30 p.m., Conference Room 4, Union.
Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies-K. Allin
Luther, president of the American Institute of Iranian Studies, noon,
Lane Hall Commons Room.
Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies-Harold E.
Hoelscher, "The Impact of the Current Situation in Lebanon on the
American University in Beriut," 4 p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Washtenaw Association for Retarded Citizens-Marjorie Mitchell,
"Mainstreaming the Trainable-Why, Where, How," 7:30 p.m., High
Point Cafeterium, 1735S. Wagner Road.
MISCEL ANEOUS

Yoiung

"The question of our national
economic security as opposed to
national military security is probably
the critical issue of the '80s," Young
said.
"I don; t think we're nearly in as
much jeopardy from the Russians as
we are from some of our economic
competitors.':'
Daily Official Bulletin
Monday, September 24. 1979
D~aily Calendar
Physics/Astronomy: G. Kane. "Can We Explain
Quark and Lepton Families with Substructure?",
2038 Randall, 4p.m.
Computing Center: Introduction to Mirs: 2. Aud.
B, Angel Hall, 7 p.m.
Best In Styling
and Best in
HAIR CARE Products
UM Stylists
at the
UN ION
Open 8.30 anMon-Sat

Hung up
A young Japanese Snow Monkey
ponders his role in the universe.
EVERYTHING YOUR
COLLEGE RING SHOULD BE,
AT A PRICE
EAR LESS THAN GOLD.
NEW WSTRIUM
mmW &MA

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