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September 23, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-23

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Page 2-Sunday, September 23, 1979-The Michigan Daily

IL

PROJECT COMMUNITY

Community Placements In:
SCHOOLS}
DETENTION CENTERS
PRISONS (JACKSON, ETC.)
MENTAL HEALTH
COURTS
GERIATRICS
DAY CARE CENTERS
CONSUMER
WOMEN'S FACILITIES
COMMUNITY CENTERS

Upper Level Credit In:
SOCIOLOGY
EDUCATION
GAIN:
CAREER EXPLORATION
PROFESSIONAL CONTACTS
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE

GM to sell
gasless car
by 1985,
article says
CHICAGO (AP) - General Motors
has developed a smaller, lighter, more
powerful battery that will enable it to
market electric-powered cars by 1985,
the Chicago Tribune said in a copyright
Sunday story.
Cliff Merriott, director of news
relations for GM in Detroit,"said
yesterday, "General Motors has no
comment on the Chicago Tribune
report. Mr. Elliott Estes, GM president,
will be in Washington on Tuesday to
make some announcement." He
declined to elaborate.
The newspaper said it had been told
that Estes' announcement will be of a
major breakthrough in battery
technology.
THE TRIBUNE said that by 1985, if
not sooner, GM will use new zinc nickel
oxide batteries, with a life span of
20,000-30,000 miles, and .an electric
motor to power some of its cars.
The new type battery is said to have
about twice the power of the lead-acid
battery it will replace and will need
recharging every 100 or so miles. This
compares with 50 miles for GM's ex-
perimental Electrovette using lead-
acid batteries.
The Tribune said replacement costs
for the new batteries would be
anywhere from $800 to $1,200.

'

REGISTRATION THRU SEPT. 27th
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 763-3548 OR
COME BY 2204 MICHIGAN UNION
1A

_.

EL

CINE

PO"'LITICO1

.iro-cnOice protest
About 70 pro-choice advocates gathered on the steps of the Capitol Building in Lansing yesterday. The citizens, from
all over Michigan, were predominantly members of the National Organization for Women and spoke out for the right
to abortion. The group listened to brief speeches from several speakers, including State Sen. Edward Pierce (D-Ann
Arbor).

ANGELL HAL
SUN., SEPT. 23
8:00 P.M.
AUD. "A"
SUN., SEPT. 30
8:00 P.M.
AUD "A"
SUN., OCT. 7
8:00 P.M.
AUD "rB" (note chc
SUN., OCT. 14
8:00 P.M.
AUD "B" r(note cha

1

Mexico: The Frozen Revolution

BRZEZINSKI DISCOURAGES SPECULA TION:

1

The film's examirlation of modern-day Mexico includes scenes of the Presidential
election of Luis Echeverria; the depiction of a day in the life of a tenant farmer;
the living conditions and customs of the Indian. communities; plus interviews
with a hacienda owner, a union official, a Socialist Party leader, and aging
veterans of Zapata's legions.
Queimada! (Burn)
Marlon Brando plays Sir William Walker, a cynical free-lance secret agent and
adventurer who is hired by the British government to dismantle Portugal's
or trade monopoly in its Caribbean island colony of Queimada. Sir William
Lame to the same stratetic conclusion in the 1840's as did the Pentagon in the
1960's. that the way to fight a guerrilla movement with a broad popular base
is to fight the people themselves, Thus in both cases we see used as routine
weapons widespread torture and executions, the recruitment of native mer-
cenarv armies to kill their own people, the rozina of villooes. the destruction of
crops. And both colonial wormokers were forced to learn the same lesson,
that the battle against an ideal cannot be won by force of arms
Nicaragua: Patria Libre 0 Morir
Film beings with scenes of Fall 1978 uprising by FSLN-explores history of
intervention in Nicaragua and role os Sondino-Eden Pastora (Commandante
Cero) discusses organization and armed struggle ~interviews women and men
Inge) of FSLN---Ernesto Cordenal celebrates Mass in camp and speaks of the oppressed
and liberation.
Six Days In Soweto
'Six Days In Soweto" s'a cinematically stunning and emotionally powerful
film-not merely a record of rebellion agoinst the violence of apartheid, but
ne an insight into the da lyliyes and consc ousness of the people of Soweto

Carter restates
WASHINGTON (UPI)-President Carter said anew the
United States will take "appropriate action" if negotiations
over Soviet troops in Cuba fail, but his security adviser
discouraged specualtion about possible military interven-
tion.
Both the president and national security affairs adviser
Zbigniew Brzezinski made the comments to a group of
editors Friday. Texts of the interviews were released yester-
day.
Brzezinski said there was no sense in "shooting oneself in
the foot" by taking steps such as a grain embargo against
Moscow.
AND, HE SAID, it would be "a cop-out" to reject the new
strategic arms limitation treaty (SALT II).
Carter described the situation this way: "We are meeting'
with the Soviet Union, assessing our intelligence data, under-
standing clearly what is the status quo, and I'll have to make
a judgment on what to do about it within the near future.
"If this effort should be unsuccessful, then I would have to
take appropriate action, and to go into further detail than
that would be inappropriate."

stance on Cuba
IN A SEPARATE session, the editors asked Brzezinski if
military action had been ruled out.
Brzezinski said the situation-an estimated 2,000 to 3,000
Soviet combat troops stationed in Cuba-is not as dangerous
as the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, which "posed a direct overt
strategic threat to the United States" in the context of a
wider crisis between the two powers over Berlin.
"This is not a situation like 1962," he said. "The crisis is
neither immediatenor as threatening by a long shot."
ASKED WHETHER U.S. wheat exports to Russia mightt
be curtailed, Brzezinski replied, "We do not think that the
prfofitable response to the Soviet Union 'is one which involves
shooting oneself in the foot in the same process."
He added, "It is a cop-out from the world of competitiort to
reject SALT II as a substitute for effectively competing"
with the Soviet Union. "In rejecting SALT, we punish our-
selves as much, if not more than we punish the Soviet
Union.'
On the troops issue, he said, "We are not seeking a
solution which involves the humiliation of one side, and the
proclamation of a victory by the other side."

For information:
Ethics and Religion
764-7442

Igv

* JOBS*
Seniors and Graduate Degree Candidates
(December 1979 and May 1980 Graduates)
It's not too early to start interviewing for jobs!
The following companies and graduate schools will be interview-
ing between now and Thanksgiving:
Contact Career Planning and Placement about signing-up for interviews
(3200 Student Activities Building)
Interviewing on Campus:

GEO-University struggle goes
on, even after all these years

OCTOBER 1. 1979
Council for Opportunity in Graduate
Management Education (COGME)
University of Southern California/
Graduate School of Business
University of Pittsburgh/Law
School
OCTOBER 2, 1979
Battelle Columbus Laboratory
Northwestern University/Graduate
School of Management
HUD
OCTOVER 3, 1979
Tektronix, Inc.
Federal Bureau of Investigation
OCTOBER 4, 1979
Harvard Law School
United Energy Resources, Inc.
OCTOBER 5, 1979
United Energy Resources, Inc..
OCTOBER8, 1979
George Washington University/
National Law Center
Rutgers University/Graduate and
Professional Admissions
Monsanto Company
OCTOBER 9, 1979
Monsanto Company 1
Montgomery Ward
OCTOBER 10, 1979
The J.L. Hudson Company
Saks Fifth Avenue
Bureau of Labor Statistics
OCTOBER 11. 1979
-U.S. Air Force
Touro Colege/Law School
OCTOBER 1 2, 1979
Ashland Oil Company
*Henry Ford Hospital
University of Missouri-St. Louis/
Graduate Admissions
National Bank of Detroit
OCTOBER 15, 1979

OCTOBER 18, 1979
Cargill Inc.
Roosevelt University/Lawyers
Assistant
Chevrolet/Info Systems Department
OCTOBER 19, 1979
PRE-LAW DAY
Manufacturers National Bank
Michigan State University/Business
Program
OCTOBER 23, 1979
AETNA Life and Casualty
Diamond Shamrock Corporation,
Peter Sundholm Associates
OCTOBER 24, 1979
General Instrument Corporation
Tandem Computers Inc.
Hewlett Packard
OCTOBER 25, 1979
Data General Corporation
Electronic Data Systems
OCTOBER 26, 1979
Professional Computer Resources
Indiana University/Graduate School
of.Business
OCTOBER 29, 1979
Dayton Power and Light Company
Rand Corporation
OCTOBER 30, 1979
Lawrence Livermore Laboratory
ACTION/Peace Corps/VISTA
Gimbels-Midwest
Dartmouth College/Amos Tuck School
of Business
OCTOBER 31, 1979
Control Data Corporation
ACTION/Peace Corps/VISTA
Fabri-Centers of America, Inc.
The GAP Stores, Inc.
NOVEMBER 1, 1979
ACTION/Peace Corps/VISTA
Intermetrics, Inc.
NOVEMBER 2, 1979

NOVEMBER 7, 1979
U.S. Navy
State Farm Insurance
U.S. Air Force .
Honeywell,'Inc.
Consumers Power Company
Woodrow Wilson School/Princeton
University
Standard Oil of Indiana
NOVEMBER 8,1979
PRE-BUSINESS DAY
Ford Motor Company
NCR Corporation
NOVEMBER 9, 1979
Ford Motor Company
Xerox Corporation
-Capital Analysts, Inc.
NOVEMBER 12, 1979
Tri-Onics, Inc.
NOVEMBER 13, 1979
Gantos
K-Mart Corporation
Northeastern University/Graduate
School of Business
Best Products Company, Inc.
Factory Mutual Engineering
Association -
Howard University
NOVEMBER 14, 1979
Center for Naval Analysis
Analytic Services, Inc.
Procter & Gamble Distribution
Company
Bendix Corporation
Harvard University/School of Business
The Upjohn Company
NOVEMBER 15, 1979
IBM Corporation
New York University/Graduate School
of Business
Lever Brothers, Inc.
NCR Corporation
Stanford University
J.B. Robinson Jewelers
NOVEMBER 16, 1979

(Continued from Page 1)
brought with it much confusion. Studen-
ts did not know which, if any, of their
ERIC'S
FACTORY OUTLET
Warmups-40% off
Women's Jog Shoes
PUMA-TIGERS $15-$20
Women's BANCROFTS $10.95
2 pair for $20
Men's BROOKS $12.95
SPEEDOS $9.00
Leotard & Tight Sets $9.25
40" Rain Jacket $16.95
White Stag Vests - Ir'S
were $65 now $35.95
Rain Poncho-side snaps $1.75
Plaid Shirts $8-$12.
Baconta T-Necks
were $19.50 now $10.50
406 E. Liberty- 663-6771
2 blocks off State St.

classes were going' to be held.
Organized walkouts took place at the
beginning of large lectures, while
strikers outside the building harangued
students to support the strike, and
professors inside urged students to at-
tend class.
Eventually, students adjusted their
class schedules. Some met for informal
classes at the homes of their teaching
assistants. Some discussion sessions
were led by professors. Many students,
however, boycotted classes altogether.
Three weeks into the strike, both sides
submitted bargaining positions to a
MERC-appointed fact-finder. One week
later, a settlement was reached.
THE UNION won a 5.6 per cent wage
increase, and $400 per term tuition fees.
GEO also succeeded in securing
assurances from the University that
T HE MICHIGAN DAILY'
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 16
Sunday, September 23, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Street Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

reprisals would not be taken againist
strikers. One key issue resolved in the
union's favor was its demand -for an
agency shop. The agency shop
provision provided that all GSAs either
join the GEO or pay a service fee to the -
union.
GEO continued to push toward a
more effective labor organization by
affiliating itself with the American
Federation of Teachers (AFT). The
AFT now provides legal service to
GEO, and advice on organization and
bargaining.
The 1975-1976 contract was to expire
August 31, 1976. Negotiations between
the University and the union criept
along, and when it appeared the tglks
were headed toward a stalemate, the
deadline was extended.
BUT DESPITE two more extensionsw.
approved by- GEO members, talks
came to a standstill in early November.
The University would not sign the ion-
tract until GEO withdrew two grievan-
ces they had against the administration
under the previous contract. GEO
refused and filed an unfair labor ptac-
tice (ULP) with MERC.
In August 1977, MERC Ad-
ministrative Law Judge Shlomo Sperka
ruled that the University had inot
bargained in good faith with the union,
and ordered it to sign the 1976-1977 coin-
tract. Sperka also ruled GSAs wero in-
deed employees, entitled to bargain
The University decided to appeal
Sperka's ruling to the full MERC board.
Last March, the University and GEO
concluded testimony in the case.

PRE-LAW
INFORMATION MEETING
Wednesday, September 26th
4 pm-Aud. C Angell Hall

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