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September 22, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-22

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Page 2-Saturday, September 22, 1979-The Michigan Daily
'U'ospital wil have to make do with

i

$210 millio
(Continued from Page 1)
officials yesterday refused to comment
on the reliability of the report, which
cited no sources for its information on
the cost ceiling.
UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS have said
they doubt the project could be com-
pleted without exceeding $210 million if
all necessary programs are included.1
University officials have maintained
the hospital's research and teachingl
functions justify added costs for the
new facility.1
Following approval of the hospital
project by the Department of Public

Health, 1
forts tow
new hosp
The st
$140 mil
tained1
Authority
plans to
throughd
THE,
hospital1
will be p
through
fund ap
state.

according to health
the Univesify will direct its ef- Seven per cent interest on the bonds
ward securing funding for the will hike the actual cost of the hospital
pital. far above $200 million.
ate legislature has set aside The department's decision will
lion for the hospital, to be ob- climax a stormy six-month review of
through a state Building the hospital project by the regional
y Bond issue. The University health systems agency and- the Depar-
raise the remaining funds tment of Public Health.
donations. REGIONAL PLANNERS and Univer-
UNIVERSITY will rent the sity officials presented a final plan to
from the state, and the bonds the department, which has final say on
paid back over several years the hospital's construction, in - late
patient care fees and general August.
propriatons allotted by the The final proposal left the University
and regional planners agreeing to

officials'
* disagree-the regional agency recom-
mended a cost ceiling of $200 million for
the project, while the University in-
sisted that the recommendation state
the University's doubt that the project
could be completed at that figure.
In the final proposal the University
agred to trim the number of patient
care beds in the new hospital from 900
to 888, the number of operating rooms
from 35 to 30, and to cap the number of
private rooms in the new hospital.
The regional council also recommen-
ded that the University explore ways to
share health care facilities.

Terrorists strike again,
Fiat executive slain

TURIN, Italy (AP) - Terrorists
pumped seven bullets into a ranking
executive of the Fiat auto company in
a street ambush yesterday, moments
after the man had kissed his wife good-
bye before going to work, police repor-
ted.
Carlo Ghiglieno, .51, head of the
automobile planning division, was
killed instantly by the four commandos
as he walked to his car, police said. The
attackers stepped close to the executive
before he could enter the car and shot
him.

One hour after the attack, a telephone
caller to a local news agency said the
killing was the work of the "Prima
Linea" or Front Line, a terrorist
organization police say is linked with
the Red Brigades who kidnapped and
killed former premier Aldo Moro last
year.
GHIGLIENO'S WIFE, a school
teacher, was among the first to rush to
the scene of the attack and saw her
husband lyingIn a pool of blood.

Uncertain results of

divestment spark debate

(Continued from Page 1)
maintained that the only way the
University can effect change in the pro-
apartheid South African government is
to divest from corporations that do
business there-a symbolic step that
could contribute to the eventual with-
drawal of those countries from South
Africa.
A large-scale corporate withdrawal
from the country would wreak havoc on
the South African economy, the
divestment advocates claim, setting
the stage for ipassive social change.
The Regents have also expressed
strong disdain for the racial
discrimination in South Africa. But
they have steadily maintained that
means other than divestment-using

stockholder power to change coporate
policies, for example-would better
battle apartheid in South Africa.
MANY OF THOSE favoring divest-
ment say the effect of the policy on the
money-making potential of University
stock holdings would be negligible.
Some Regents and administrators,
however, have expressed concern that
wholesale divestment would result in
purchases of stock that are less
desirable financially.
"My first inclination is that it
(divestment) would do nothing," said
Prof. Alan Deardorff, associate chair-
man of the University's Economics
Department. "I don't think it makes
much difference to the University, the

companies, or South Africa," Deardorff
said yesterday.
"I never understood why they
(Univesity officials) have to hold onto
those stocks," Deardorff said. "They
could be doing really well without
them."
MEMBERS OF the Washtenaw Coun-
ty Coalition Against Apartheid (WC-
CAA), the group that has spearheaded
the divestment drive, say the Univer-
sity could benefit black South Africans
without hurting itself financially by
divesting.
"If you look at it all ... the blue-chip
organizations aren't doing that well,"
said coalition member Heidi Gottfried,
indicating that the University invest-

ments could be profitably shifted from
the presently-owned stock to stock with
companies not involved in South Africa.
According to Norman Herbert, the
University's investment officer, the
University's total investment portfolio
amounts to about $62.4 million in stocks
and about $35.5 million in bonds. He
estimates that more than 55 per cent of
that money would be affected by
University divestment.
HERBERT SAID divestment would
not likely affect the companies in South
Africa. According to the administrator,
the University probably holds less than
,one per cent of any given company.
Herbert said the University might
have a difficult time finding investmen-
ts that would provide the same yield as
the present ones should the Regents
decide to divest.
Last year, the Michigan State
University Board of Trustees voted to
sell its stocks in corporations that do
business in South Africa. Steven Terry,
assistant vice-president for business
and finance at MSU, said MSU will
likely be able to make as much of a

profit from their portfolio as they were
making prior to the move. He added,
however, that MSU's portfolio is
significantly smaller than that of the
University of Michigan, and that this
may make a difference in U-M's ability
to profitably reinvest its funds should it
choose to divest.
Yale University presently has the
same policy as the University of
Michigan-it will retain stocks in all
companies doing business in South
Africa as long as they ascribe to the
Sullivan Principles, which are designed
to discourage discrimination.
- Yale Vice-President for Finance and

Adminstration Jerold Stevens
estimated that Yale would lose about
$15 million from its $600 million por-
tfolio should it choose to divest from
firms doing business in South Africa.
The Michigan Society of Fellows, a
program unique to public universities,
was established in 1970 at the Univer-
sity with a $2 million Ford Foundation
grants to assist graduate students "who
show originality and whose interests
are not regularly accommodated in
other scholarship programs."

.:r:::: . _ _. ..i :+ Y}:if +;. +.f:it$:i\ +:. ,- . "' v ~$ 'ii ,M Y':ri:i "+"

Detroit firm to buy National Bank

Daily Official Bulletin

By STEVE HOOK
A Detroit firm has arranged to purchase the local company
.that controls National Bank and Trust Co., one of four banks
operating in the Ann Arbor area.
Detroit National Corp., parent company for National Bank
of Detroit-the state's largest-as well as several outstate
banks, will purchase the 441,130 shares of National Ann Arbor
Corp. common stock, according to a deal reached earlier this
week.
DETROIT NATIONAL will buy the shares, which sold
Wednesday .for $35-38, for $65.25 per share.

"It will give us tremendous clout," said National Bank
Vice-President Eugene Fowler. "They'll have a lot of resour-
ces we will now have access to."
Fowler estimates that the National Ann Arbor Corp. will
continue to operate for "about a year" until the Detroit cor-
poration assumes full control.
National Bank's localbranch is located on the corner of
William and Thompson Streets.
National Detroit Corp. currently owns banks in Detroit,
Saginaw, Dearborn, Portage, Port Huron, Troy, Grandville,
Lansing, and Alpeda.

SaturdaySeptember 22,,1979
Daily Calendar:
Institute for Continuing Legal Education: James
White, "Current Problems in Commercial and
Banking Law," 116 Hutchins, 9a.m.

Football: UM vs. Kansas, Michigan Stadium, I
p.m.
Macromolecular Research Center: James
O'Reilly, "FTIR Spectroscopy and Calorimetry of
the Amorphous State," 3005 Chem, 4 pam.

J

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ChrchWrship Services'

at
I Free Pregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
Confidential Counseling
Complete Birth Control Clinic
Medicaid " Blue Cross
(313) 941-*1810 Ann Arbor and
Downriver area
(313)559.0590 Southfield area
Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc. V54

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 15
Saturday, September 22
is edited and managed by students;
the University of Michigan. Publish(
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornini
during the University year at 4:
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, M ichigz
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septen
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 k
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summ
session published Tuesday throug
Saturday mornings. Subscription rate
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail ou
side Ann Arbor. Second class posta
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POS.
M ASTER: Send address changes1
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynai
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

1 LUi J C J l _ C_ J l

4'

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
727 Miller Rd.
at Sunday School--10a.m.
SO Morning Worship-11 a.m.
SO Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
an 7:00 p.m.
S SundayEvening Service, 727 Miller,
by Community Room-6:00 p.m.
gh For spiritual help or a ride to our
s: services please feel free to call Pastor
It- Thomas Loper, 663-7306.
to UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
rd THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
* * *
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.m.'
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Right of Reconciliation-4 °p.m.-
5 p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30a.m:.
Sunda Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
MidWee-Worship-Wed esday at
10:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule :
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Mike Pennanen, Shirley Polakowski
Sunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
ing. Meal at 5:30.
Sunday-6:15-Worship Fellowship.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. South St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish.
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship at Canterbury Loft.
6:00 p.m.-Sunday Evening Medita-
tion.

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
502 E. Huron St. (between State &
Division)--663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service, Child
Care Pr.iee-Sept. 23 Sermon: "In
Sear i 9f Heros
11:00 a.m.-College Class-led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop.
5:30 p.m.-Sunday Family Night Sup-
pers in Fellowship Hall.
Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m.-Campus
Discussion Group-led by Margi
Stuber, M.D., in the Campus Center
Lounge.
* * *
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
CHURCH; SBC
2580 Packard Road
971-0773
Michael Clingenpeel, Ph.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:45, Sunday School; 11:00,
Morning Worship.
Student Transportation call 662-6253
or 764-5240.
6:00 p.m.-Student supper; 7 ,m.-
Worship.
Wednesday, 6 p.m.-Dinner and
Church family activities.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
a.m.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY
CHURCH
-1769 Broadway
Rev. Ted Richmond
3 p.m.-Worship with presentation by
Representative Perry Bullard.
For Gays.

Graduating Engineers

You've learned a lot in school. Now it's
time to put your knowledge to work. You
want that work to be interesting and
challenging. And to lead you to a
rewarding career.
You'll find that kind of work experience
at Sperry Flight Systems, a leader in the
development and manufacture of high
technology systems and instrumenta-
tion for the aircraft and space industry.
We're looking for BS and MS graduates
in Electrical, Electronic, Mechanical and
Aeronautical/Aerospace Engineering.
Your work assignments may involve:
Product design
Research & development

more than just exciting work and good
pay. Employment at Sperry also means
you'll benefit from the attractive lifestyle
and year-round recreational activities
that come with-our Phoenix location.
Well be on campus
Oct 4
Talk to us while we're on campus. We'd
like for you to know about our attractive
compensation and complete benefits
program, and for you to have more
details about the sophisticated work you
can be doing. Contact your campus

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Christ's Sermon On The Mount Is near the beginning of
The New Testament in The Book of Matthew, chapters 5, 6,
and 7. In chapter 6:9-13 is recorded The Lord's Prayer.
Usually these verses are recited by the congregption in the
public worship of Protestant and Evangelical Christians:
"OUR FATHER WHICH ART IN HEAVEN, HALLOWED BE
THY NAME. THY KINGDOM COME.THY WILL BE DONE IN
EARTH, AS IT IS IN HEAVEN. GIVE US THIS DAY OUR
DAILY BREAD. AND FORGIVE US OUR DEBTS, AS WE
FORGIVE OUR DEBTORS. AND LEAD US NOT INTO
TEMPTATION, BUT DELIVER US FROM EVIL: FOR THINE
IS THE KINGDOM, AND THE POWER, AND THE GLORY,
cn cvc A Sfc&

The forgiveness of God is made conditional upon our
forgiving those who have wronged us. We submit this is a
dangerous prayer for the unconverted, and those unable to
forgive others, lest we be found praying God to condemn us,
and not fotgivel
Myriads of Christians have, and doubtless every true
Christian can testify how they have "cast the burden of an
unforgiving spirit upon The Lord," and have been so blessed
and their attitude changed that they could truly
sing: "Makes me love everybody." A forgiving spirit, and
the spirit of hatred of evil, are not enemies, but rather
brothers with the same Spirit of God: "Ye that love The
i~nd hwat kmA W-Ps.al~m 07!1nl

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