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September 06, 1979 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

age 4B-Thursday, September 6, 1979-The
Studen
By ADRIENNE LYONS

}

When most newcomers to the University
arrive in Ann Arbor they are faced with the
academic rigors of this institution. There are
generally two options open to all individuals:
spend four years huddled over open books in
guest of a nearly flawless grade point average,
or sacrifice a little of that study time in order to
Vnjoy those years.
It seems that most students choose the latter
course, with many opting to spend their time in
student organizations, which are plentiful on
eampus. These groups serve not only as time-
killers, but to some they're also helpful in
striving toward , future, and sometimes
professional, goals.
There are groups that meet in almost every
Mrt of town and at a great variety of times
roughout the week.
- 'ANY STUDENT organizatiops register
th the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA).

Michigan Daily
groups
"Registration lets us know who's on campus
and lets them (organizations) have access to
University facilities, such as use of the Diag,"
said Roy More, coordinator of student
organizations for MSA.
Registration with MSA also allows
organizations to receive funding from the
student organization. Groups must go to MSA's
budget committee for a review of their fund
requests.
"Only student organizations are registered,"
More said, "but some organizations have
national affiliation, or corporate affiliation. We
recognize local student chapters."
One such organization is the Students Inter-
national Mediation Society (SIMS). According
to Laurie Quarton, a teacher for SIMS, the Ann
Arbor group is just one branch of the 25-year-
old organization that teaches transcendental
meditation (TM).
QUARTON SAID anyone can join the seven-

relief
year-ola cnapter. wnen people first join, she
said, they are taught the techniques of TM. Af-
ter TM students master the techniques, they
can continue in special programs SIMS
organizes, such as lectures or courses.
Quarton estimated that SIMS ha taught
2,700 people TM techniques, adding that about
one-half of them were University students.
If your tastes are more up in the air, there is
the University Skydiving Club. "Our main pur-
pose is to just get people out to make their first
jump," said President Nancy Domeier.
Domeier said the biggest advantage new
students have in joining the club is in the
discounts on skydiving classes and the use of
University equipment. Domeier said students
are required to take six hours of class before
they make their first jump. The class regularly
costs $50, but students receive a $10 discount.
Domeier added that when students become
advanced enough to make free falls, they must

rom academics

pay the fee, which ranges from $3 to $6, but
students get to use University equipment.
THE MICHIGAN Gamer's Council is an
organization which coordinates role-playing
games and board games for members.
Eldert Bontekoe, chairman of the group, said
the Gamer's Council acts as coordinators for
all the games by setting up rooms and times for
players to meet and by publishing a magazine.
"The club introduces people with others who
have similar interests," Bontekoe said, adding
that during the school year approximately 80
per cent of the club's members are students.
Bontekoe also said many of the club's members
are high school students and University alum-
ni.
THE UNIVERSITY Activities Center (UAC)
is the "programming organization on cam-
pus," said UAC Vice-president for Public

Relations Patrick Day. According to Day,
UAC's 14 committees provide both cultural and
entertainment events for the University. From
Homecoming to the Viewpoint Lecture Series,
and Eclipse Jazz concerts to mini-courses in
the Union, UAC's "focus has been program-
ming" since its inception in 1965, said Day.
Day stressed that UAC is "entirely student-
run and we're always looking for new studen-
ts." He said the 400 UAC staff members act as
promoters, business managers, and coor-
dinators. In addition, there are several senior
officers who maintain continuity between the
14 committees, and committee chairpersons.
Day said the 14 committees organize UAC's
features, including noted speakers such as
economist John Kenneth Galbraith and
political satirist Mark Russell. UAC also gave a
presentation with slides for incoming freshper-
sons at orientation this summer.

Religious groups thrive in A2

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
With over a hundred religious
Tim TaLorganizations on campus this year,
students shouldn't have much trouble
finding a group to match individual
lifestyles.
The Office of Ethics and Religion at
the Michigan Union carries a complete
listing of campus ministries-every-
thing from Eastern, Muslim, Jewish,
and denominational facilities to black
spiritual resources and interdenomina-
tional.
CAMPUS CHAPEL is one of several
Christian Reformed Churches on cam-
pus. According to Rev. Don Postema,
church activities center around
University issues. Chapel activities in-
clude discussion groups, Bible study,
mini-courses and social events.
The Wesley Foundation of the United
Methodist Church sponsors discussion
groups, social programs, and weekend
retreats.
ABOUT 3,000 students, faculty, and
staff attend St. Mary's Catholic Church
located on the corner of Thompson and
William. "We have a very open chur-
ch," says one member, "and you don't
have to be Catholic to participate."
Student groups include the Newman
Student Association which meets Mon-
Welcome Students
TO THE
DASCOLA
HAI RSTYLISTS
ARB0RLAND971 -9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
JEWELRY AN D FINE WA TCHESE. LIBERTY-668-9329
sUHUVE YNARBO RE. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

day evenings for educational or
recreational activities. Facilities at the
Father Richard Center adjacent to the
church are open daily and include a
student library, comfortable lounge
and classrooms.
Ecumenical Campus Center for In-
ternational Understanding Director
Paul Dotson explains the philosophy
behind the program as, "global in em-
phasis, not sectarian. The world's
cultures and values are interdepen-
dent," he said, "and we attempt to
represent as many issues and opinions
as religious beliefs."
If you're looking for an artistic per-
spective, Canterbury Loft is one choice.
The Loft combines conventional and in-
novative approaches in a double
program. For the traditional
Episcopalian student, Sunday activities
at St. Andrews Church on N. Division
include a 9 a.m. study group, workship
at 10, and a soup, bread, and cheese
lunch at noon.
THE LOFT, located at 332 S. State
St., is used as a campus center for the
performing arts. The idea behind it, ac-
cording to staffer Andrew Foster, is to
bring the nature of the arts to
everybody-not just theatre majors.
"The religious focus is pluralistic," he
says. "We don't evangelize-the arts
stand out on their own." Productions
put on by student groups are designed
to promote awareness of the world by

raising ethical, spiritual, social, or
political questions.~ p
The interdenominational groups on
campus also conform to a "we don't
evangelize" doctrine. At Word of God,
classified by staff member Martha
Charnely as an "ecumenical,
charismatic, Christian community,"
all of the Christian denominations are
represented. Emphasis at Word of God
is to help members incorporate God in-
to their day-to-day lifestyles. Group
members spend time together in prayer
and recreation, and there is no formal
church meeting.
At Guild House, located at the corner
of Monroe and Oakland, the focus is on
"the human condition," explained Ann
Coleman, the organization's co-
director. Coleman added that "issues
are as important as religion." The
House offers its facilities to students
concerned with social action or change.
BUT NOT ALL campus ministries
are affiliated with Christian concerns.
The Muslim Students Association is
the only Islamic organization on cam-
pus. The association meets at the
Islamic Center located on N. Ingalls,
where daily and weekly services are
held. Students from all ethnic
backgrounds participate in what is one
of the larger groups on campus. Ac-
tivities include Koran study sessions,
seminars, children's services, and

outreach programs to prisons, and
other organizations.
Siddha Yoga Dham is concerned with
the Eastern practice of uniting spiritual
"inner selves" with "outer selves." In
fact, Siddha Yoga may be translated to
mean "perfect union." Members come
from all denominations and
professions. Activities include reading,
discussion, chanting, and meditation
nightly at 8 p.m. at the main meditation
hall, on Baldwin Street.
Both Chabad House and Hillel offer
religious services, classes, social even-
ts, and meals to Jewish students. The
former, located on Hill Street, also has
furnished rooms available for live-in
students. Both are headquarters for
Jewish organizations such as Hillel's
COJO (Council of Jewish
Organizations), or AKSTIN (Action for
Soviet Jewry). Hillel is located on Hill
Street.
THERE ARE also several groups on
campus under the heading of Black
Spiritual Resources. For those in-
terested in experiencing religion in a
predominantly black setting, the Office
of Ethics and Religion can be helpful.
And there are also many unique
groups on campus. The Baha'i Student
Association, centered on Packard, is
one such organization. A central theme
to the Baha'i faith is "oneness of
religion." The student association
meets in homes or at the International
Center. Their activities include group
discussions,.lectures on contemporary
topics, and dance festivals.
The Church of Scientology provides
its own religious perspectives. Scien-
tologists claim self-knowledge instills
self-confidence and can even lead to
spiritual healing both within the outside
the self. The church provides free
public services, personality tests, and
introductory lectures. Sunday church
service on Henry Street begins at 2:30
p.m.

U of M Freshman Survey
1. School should be:
A. Q CHALLENGING
B. Q INTERESTING
C. Q ENJOYABLE
D. Q MEMORABLE
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
FRATERNITY
"FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE"

ENERGY.
We can't
afford to
waste it.

1601 WASHTENAW

761-2373

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I-) t

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f, .h
':
Y ',
1
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F S

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it the UnLverstty of M~chsir#

You're here! So are we. And that can lead to some great things.
We're Jacobson's, just off campus at 612 E. Liberty with our:
Miss J Shop. Here you'll get your embroidered "Go Blue"
U of M denims. Cords. Fun furs for gametime. Everything
that's western from the hats to the boots. Right up to
suits of wool gabardine. All the career/dress looks.
Mr. J: you've got your own store at 312 South State St.
You'll find straight leg denims and cords, all colors.
Levi's at $14. Every kind of sport shirt. Long-sleeved

photo by Ann Arbor News
Is Home To These Independent Groups and Activities:
AKTSIA (Action For Soviet Jewry)
BEITIMIDRASH (15.Non-Credit Judaica Courses-Registration
Sept. 17-21)
COJO (Council Of Jewish Organizations)
GRAD STUDENTS ORGANIZATION
HEBREW CHORUS & ISRAELI DANCE PERFORMING GROUP
DORM OUTREACH PROGRAMS
THE JEWISH STAR (Student Paper)
JEWISH ELDERLY PROJECT (Psych 201, Outreach)
SHABBAT SERVICES (3 Types) AND MEALS
U.J.A. HATIKVAH CAMPAIGN
UNION OF STUDENTS FOR ISRAEL
INVITES YOU TO THE ANNUAL

C1n O -3 C=1

I

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