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September 06, 1979 - Image 51

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 6, 1979-Page 3B

1

Minorities face double challenge at

3

'

By SARA ANSPACH
and BETH PERSKY
More often than not, minority students
adjust to what is often described as the
"impersonal" University environment,
and many enjoy their college years in
Ann Arbor. But the startling numbers
of- minority students who leave the
University without graduating
sometimes find college life here com-
parable to fighting a losing battle on
alien territory.
'Minority students often have an ex-
tra set of issues to deal with," said
Elizabeth Davenport, the University
Office of Student Services ombud-
speson. She said psychological
problems such as low self image, as
well as financial difficulties and poorer
study skill backgrounds often and an ex-,
tra burden to minorities trying to suc-
ceed at the University.
SOME STUDENTS and ad-
ministrators say the sometimes un-

favorable atmosphere at the University
can be the biggest obstacle with which
minorities have to contend. "In
general, black students do not feel com-

ter House. "I used to think college
students were very progressive, and
racism was something that was not a
big deal among college students.. . it's

'This University is for the
middle class-let's face it.'
-John Concannon

white

University undergraduate
Native A merican admissions
officer

non, University undergraduate Native
American admissions officer,
MANY STUDENTS say classes ap-
proach subject matter from a white,
middle class perspective. Potts noted
that in a world politics class he took,
half of the blacks dropped out. He
claimed the class made minorities feel
as if they were not a factor in world
politics.
Few will deny that some professors
are racially biased. "I would say there
is probably academic discrimination
that exists in the minds of some of the
faculty," said ombudsperson Daven-
port.
Dormitory life, too, can prove to be
frustrating for minority students. "The
dorms have their own way of adding
problems," said LSA junior Sherrie
King, who is currently forming a group
called Black Students United. Virtually
every dormitory has an organization
for minorities, but often these groups
have trouble obtaining funding and a

voice in their dorm's student gover-
nment.
According to most minority students,
the University's impersonal at-
mosphere, middle class orientation and
sometimes unfriendly social environ-
ment are partially responsibleeforrthe
school's high minority attrition rates.
Approximately 42 per centof the black
population, 46 per cent of the Hispanic
population and 68 per cent of the Native
Americans on campus leave the
University without graduating, com-

pared to 26 per cent of Asian Americans
and whites.
Not all minority students who
disenroll leave for these reasons. One
black student who recently left the
University said, "The University is
very friendly if you're a friendly per-
son." He said he didn't find the
academics or the atmosphere difficult
at all, but dropped out because he wan-
ted to "party" for a couple years-a
reason many students of all
backgrounds decide not to return to the
University.

fortable at the University," said Pam
Gordon, former Michigan Student
Assembly vice-president for minority
affairs.
"It's not the liberal university most
people think it is," said Randy Potts,
student programming director of Trot-

a very real problem. I wish it wasn't
that way," he said.
Many say the University is an in-
stitution which caters to middle class
students from suburban high schools.
"This University is for the white middle
class-let's face it," said John Concan-

I
r

SPECIAL PROGRAMS LEND HAND:
Services offer aid to minorities

By BETH PERSKY
While the University offers a wide
range of supportive services for
minorities-including special finan-
cial aid and counseling-there is debate
among students and administrators
over the effiiency and effectivenss of
the programs.
Special services designed for blacks
and Hispanic-, Asian-, and Native

Americans are offered in varied forms parently are not satisfied with the
by the University. Trotter House on present services offered to minority
Washtgnaw Avenue, for example, of- students. At the Regents meeting last
fers social and cultural events for March, a group of students called for a
minority students, while Project report that could be presented to the
Awareness helps minority students Board outlining information ,on
with housing difficulties. Minority minority student enrollment, retention,
Student Services provides general and financial support at the University.
counseling to minorities. AFTER HEARING the report in
But many students on campus ap- April, the Regents passed a resolution

calling for the creation of a task force to
examine some minority student
problems. The task force was also
charged with investigating declining
minority student enrollment as well as
seeking ways to improve overall
minority services.
The committee, which was formed
over the summer, consists of six
students, two administrators, two
faculty members, and two staff mem-
bers.
Although minority students now ac-
count for approximately nine per cent
of the student body, according to a
University report, they receive about
See SPECIAL, Page 12

CAMPUS
CHAPEL
One block North of
S. University and Forest
668-742 1
Mr. Clayton Libolt
10am: Morning Worship
6 pm: Evening Worship
A Campus Ministry of the Christian Reformed Church
(A Fellowship irn the Reformed Tradition)

1 10

REGENCY TPAVEL INC.
Serving theI-
University Community-University Delivery Service

STUD

)ENTS FACULTY S
Individuals or Groups /Domestic or International

TAFF

f '
x-
h
t.
*W -
wWILLIAM

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS HONORED
TICKET DELIVERY SERVICE
HOTELS * CAR RENTALS * CRUISES

LIBEF

Dbily Photo
WILLIAM MONROE TROTTER House, located on Washtenaw, is one of the many special offerings for minorities on
campus. Like other minority organizations, Trotter House sponsors social and cultural activities throughout the year.

CALL
665-6122

"Satisfying Your Full Travel Needs with Friendly Personalized Service"

z S
0

i

Convenient L9cgjion: 601 E. William
(CORNER E. WILLIAM & MAYNARD)

-

Loll

- U - U - .

ANN ARBOR

04C .1

p.

Beca
I N

f.t~* F ~ . 5*"S O,

'5%
et .

CHANTING &
MEDITATION

'C
r S

every

evening
at

8pm

4 .
.8,
.a," 0

"I Wear Bass, Bcuse
IDoii't Imitate
Anyody.'

i.

Siddha Yoga Dham

WAp
0~2

vMI

MUKTANANDA'S

ASHRAM
994-5625

BALDWI N

I

WON... or

..y?'s ,{ . ry... y "you ygy_'1 yG e - ? j yS mS ' °i!t .. }4 ' ' t). b 'i {,' S' 'Y' pQ
. n + S $ .."/c:. " "' 5a:o..."O.ec V{s ° o,1 i2:'',fri O Ti ^ . i°e'b, V°rc"J.. iRh ne.. 6s ?i.^'C. aL .2" QC jrc4} . 3 ."n':'xi . .'.'k ... .. a .° k": ..... .

ENERGY.
We can't afford
to waste it.

People either lead, or they follow. At
G. H. Bass, we've been leaders in the
hand-crafting of casual shoes for over
100 years. Of course, we have imita-
tors, but it doesn't worry us too much.
After all, for us . . . and for our many
customers, almost isn't good enough.
If you wear our shoes, you don't settle
for imitations. You wear the original.
Take, for example, the item shown.
It's an original Bass Tack®, one of 14
Tack® designs.
Come in and try on a shoe that isn't
an imitation of anything. After all...
you might find it refreshing to find
people imitating you!

is

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