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September 09, 1979 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-09

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September 9, 1979-The Michigan Daily

AUnited Artist ;Exclusive
now showing at:
TheMoies eat
Prudential Town Center
Corner of Evergreen and 1-696
In Southfield
The strangest things happen
when you wear polka dots
oliAR L )
MARCELLO DANON presents
UGOTOGNAZZI MICHEL SERRAULT
"LA CAGE AUX FOLLES"
(Enish Subtts)
Based upon the play by JEAN POIRET A film by EDOUARD MOLINARO
CopYrightUC>19> 9 United Atists Cooraion, All,fihtres,, U.... A.. e.

MR. ALDA GOES TO WASHINGTON

'Joe

Tynan': Blind ambition

By CHRISTOPHER POTTER
Decorum has it that in order to keep
a friend a friend, one should never
discuss religion or politics-at least not
on anything approaching a serious
level. It is a dictum which Hollywood,
at least, has always devotedly obser-
ved.
Not that the movies aren't willing to
bend their tinsel dogma to conform with
the presumed tempo of the times: It's

been fascinating to watch how ti
dustry has managed the last half-
years to execute a 180 degree tu:
both aforementioned touchy sub
yet in its dada alterations com
closer to real life.
FOR OVER half a century cell
portrayals of Christianity an
disciples occupied a plateau of
purity that these practitioners'
serenity over it all approa

he in-
dozen
rn on
jects,
ie no
luloid

physical-verbal catatonia. Even Cecil
DeMille's biblical extravaganzas in-
variably depicted simple faith
conquering all perversity, however
much the director pointedly choise to
dwell on the latter.

d i
su
ve
ch

r- CINEMA 11 -ON

koo
4001

PRESENTS

roWcL"

I

MURDER
(Alfred Hitchcock, 1930)
An early British treatment of a favorite Hitchcock theme:
a lone juror (HERBERT MARSHALL), convinced of the in-
nocence of a woman (DIANA BARING) convicted of murder,
sets out to find the real murderer. One of Hitch's rare
"whodunits," MURDER features a stream-of-consciousness
monologue and a denouement involving a transvestite.
(92 min. 7:00 ONLY

If

".
v9.
m

La CogeAux Folles
Bring a Guest "FREE to...
* the movie: *
Valid Prudential Movies Only

i

LU
LL
C
Q

TOPAZ
(Alfred Hitchcock, 1969)
Hitchcock's 50th film is ased on Leon Uris's best-selling
tale of political espionage. Moving through Coppenhagen,
Washington, New York, tuba, and Paris the film abounds
in the usual Hitchcock uotient of moral ambiguity and
technical mastery. With OHN FORSYTHE, FREDERIC STAF-
FORD, and PHILLIPPE NOIRE. (126 min.) 9:00 ONLY.

its
ch l
ry
ed
Indeed The Bible did at least provide
orgies, miracles and other ex-
tracurriculars to keep things souped
up. Alas, American political history
lends few comparable abnormalities, at
least on such an epic scale. Thus
movies rendered not only politicians
but the entire American social spec-
trum in the most mordantly solemn,
patriotism-swathed trappings. Lead
characters were strictly limited to
spoken platitudes complete with
quotations marks hung on every line,
and Stephen Foster or John Philip
Sousa reverently warbling in the
background. (Only Frank Capra
managed to break this stodgy mold, yet
his films were forever tinged in such
comic whimsy that one always doubted
the profundity of the director's beliefs).
All this has lately changed, of course;
we're now immersed in the
disillusioned 70's, and Hollywood has
caught the negativity bug with a
gloulish vengence. Almost within war-
All this has lately changed, of course;
we're now _immersed in the
disillusioned 70's, and Hollywood has
caught the negativity bug with a
ghoulish vengence. Almost without
warning the pious solidity of A Man
Called Peter or Brigham Young was
replaced by the vomit, gore and ar-
megeddon of The Omen or The
Amityville Horror, wherein the clergy
and its adherents were cast at best as
helpless dupes and at worst as willing
accomplices of whatever antichrist

happened to be surfacing at the
moment.
THE VIET-WATERGATE saturation
of the times worked a similar political
mutation on the big screen: Where once
our elected officials-Hollywood ver-
sion-could do no wrong, suddenly they
could do no right. Moviegoers found
themselves assaulted by The Paralax
View, The Domino Principle and a
multitude of similar conspiratorial
melodramas united in their morose,
paranoic dementia. Even science fic-
tion (Capricorn One) and horror
movies (The Fury) got sucked into the
pseudo-political genre, a nihilistic en-
tertainment in which the villians aren't
egomaniacal usurpers but rather a part
of gray, intrenched domestic of-
ficialdom-nameless, faceless and
above all invincible. Hollywood had to
last clutched Pogo Possum's "we have
met the enemy and he is us" to its
bosom with a ferocity made grotesque
both by its belatedness and its glibly
chic flip-flop of ideals,
ONE HAD hoped Alan Alda's The
Seductions of Joe Tynan would prove a
refreshing ancedote to such socio-
governmental balderbash. In terms 'of
intent, it stands virtually alone with
1972's The Candidate as an honest,
mature attempt to deal with the
workings of the American political
system and the extraordinary
pressures it exerts upon its prac-
titioners. (The superior All The
President's Men as primarily a study of
journalism rather than politics).
The Candidate was a visually daz-
zling chronicle of a liberal idealist's
California campaign for a U.S. Senate
seat, but the picture eventually
drowned in the implausably over-
bearing cynicism of its script-which in
effect stated thatit's impossible to be
both a politician and a man of principle.
The Seduction of Joe Tynan paints a
considerably more hopeful picture,
arguing that the delicate balance of
belief and compromise form the
See JOE, Page 7

1ANGELL HALl

THEATRES

* Wit This Coupon Rece v e O a
FREE Admission with Onv
Paid Adult Admission.
(void Sept. 29th)

6

$1.50, $2.50 for double feoture*^

Tuesday; ONE SINGS, THE OTHER DOESN'T

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Binding SET.C
Collating
Graphic
camera S (-Arts-
work CV student discounts

THE MICHIGAN UNION

TEL. (313) 665-8065

530 S. STATE a ANN ARBOR. MICHI ANo48109 0
Now Playing at Butterfield Theatres

% l" 'J %r/

-

/1'Vr /'

- ' . I
* ..
:,'1

WEDNESDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY"
$1.50 UNTIL 5:30

I.

MATINEES DAILY AT
STATE 1-2-3-4
Doors Open 12:45 P.M.

I

"GUEST NIGHT"
Two Adults Admitted
For $3.00

/(

Single
tickets"

1%

State 17-2-3-
231 S. Statt -662-6264 -ANN ARBOR

pk

hhhhh,

now
on sale for.

I. i

I

1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
A game ago in a gaaxyf fcf away
.nAR. MAS
....._(Up per level)r

~-zIVA~

53 presentations of the

finest in music and

dance!

Julliard String Quartet .......... Mon., Sept. 24
Joan Sutherland, soprano and
Richard Bonynge, pianist ..... Thurs., Oct. 4
Bohemian Folk Ballet. . .... . .....Thurs.,.Oct. 4
Prague Chamber Orchestra ........Sun., Oct. 7
Moscow State Symphony ........ Sat., Oct. 13
Michael Lorimer, guitarist ........ Mon., Oct. 15
The Moscow Pops Orchestra......Wed., Oct. 17
Youri Egorov, pianist,...........Thurs., Oct. 18
Waverly Consort ...............Mon., Oct. 22
Paul Gaulin Mime Company ...... Tues., Oct. 23
Solomons Company/Dance .......Wed., Oct. 24
James Galway, flutist
with harp andviola ......... Thurs., Oct. 25
Boston Camerata ................. Sun., Oct. 28
Chinese Acrobats of Taiwan ........ Sat., Nov. 3
Cloud Gate Dance Theatre ......... Sun., Nov. 4
Martha Graham Dance Company .... Nov. 5, 6, 7
Dresden Staatskapelle ........... Sun., Nov. 11
Fred Waring Show .............Fri., Nov. 16
Syntagma Musicum .... . .....Tues., Nov. 20
ii....E.. c"A*ese.:.." KJ A In D r 1 9

Tchaikovsky's "Nutcracker" ballet
Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre ........ Dec. 13-16
Les Grands Ballets Canadiens .....Sun., Jan. 20
Alfred Brendel, pianist ........... Tues., Jan. 22
Concord String Quartet...........Sun., Jan. 27
Glinka Chorus/Leningrad ........ Tues., Jan. 29
Eliot Feld Ballet ....... .............Feb. 1, 2, 3
Orpheus Chamber Ensemble ......... Fri., Feb. 8
Leontyne Price, soprano............Sat., Feb. 9
Zurich Chamber Orchestra .........Fri., Feb. 15
Jean-Pierre Rampal, flutist and
Alexandre Lagoya, guitarist .. Mon., Feb. 18
Aldo Ciccolini, pianist .......... Thurs., Feb. 21
Founders Day Concert.............Sun., Feb.24
Cuban Folk Ensemble ............ Tues., Feb. 26
Krasnayarsk Dance Company ...... Fri., Feb. 29
Elly Ameling, soprano ........... Wed., Mar. 12
Kingdom of Bhutan (Dance) .......Sat., Mar. 15
Jury's Irish Cabaret of Dublin .....Tues., Mar. 18
Yehudi Menuhin, violinist and
Hephzibah Menuhin, pianist . Wed.,Mar. 19
Qw ;ir.. . C\!!4\!"\F1A/1\! r . ( rkme rn _ -W~adAnr. 9

Cam us
12145 .Univ. aty 668-6416 -ANN ARBOR
Mon -Tue-Thur Fri 8P M. BEST PICTURE Sot.Sun
ROBERT .L WINNER Wed.
5 1:30
[ -4:45
DE NIROAWARDS
302O'ht tnow 434-1782 -YPSILANTI Fri -Mon.-Tue. T ur.
GREASE-7:00
FEVER-9:00
Is the word
.Catch it SAT.-SUN.-WED.-GREASE 1:00-5:00-9:10

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