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September 09, 1979 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-09

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 9, 1979-Page 5

BYRD PLANS DEBA TE FOR NO V. 1
SALT stalled in Senate

Universitly of Michigan Hospital
COLE GIUNTEEPROGRAM
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETIG

I

From AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON--The strategic arms
limitation treaty (SALT) should not be
"held hostage" to the issue of Soviet
combat troops in Cuba, Senate Majority
Leader Robert Byrd declared yester-
day.
However, the West Virginia
Democrat acknowledged that if the
U.S.-Soviet treaty were to'be voted on
"in today's .environment, it would have
< a rough time" and would fall short of
the two-thirds majority needed for
Senate ratification.
BYRD SAID at a news conference he
plans to start floor debate on SALT II on.
Nov. 1-later than originally expec-
ted-and hopes that by then, "the dust
should have settled" on the Cuban con-
troversy.
Byrd also said he hopes the Senate
can complete action on SALT II by
Thanksgiving Day, when he expects
Congress to adjourn for the rest of the
year. Byrd has opposed letting the
treaty debate spill over into the 1980
election year.
When asked about U.S. intelligence

reports that between 2,000 and 3,000
Soviet combat troops are stationed in
Cuba, Byrd answered: "Let's keep
cool, let's keep our heads"
'THE SENATOR said many questions
remain about why the troops are in
Cuba and how long they have been
there. But he said it is clear that they do
not pose an immediate threat to the
United States.
The president's National Security
Adviser, Zbigniew Brezinski, in com-
ments to editors Friday that were
released by the White House yesterday,
said the Soviet troop incident bore no
resemblance to the 1962 Cuban missile
crisis.
It should not be allowed to interfere
with the ratification of SALT II, he ad-
ded.
"WE ARE NOT dealing with a
strategic crisis; nor are we dealing"
with a direct and overt military threat
directed at the United States," Brezin-
ski told the editors.
Byrd's remarks closely parallel
comments made by President Carter
on Friday. Carter vowed to use "firm

diplomacy" to resolve the question but
cautioned against "panic" at home.'
Since the disclosure a week ago that a
Soviet combat brigade was located in
Cuba, some senators considered crucial
to ratification of SALT II have
threatened to withhold their support un-
til the issue of Russian troops is
resolved.
HOWEVER, BYRD said SALT II
should be approved or rejected strictly,
on the basis of whether it improves U.S.
security.
"If it's in the security interest of this
country, why should it be held hostage
to the Cuban situation?" Byrd asked.
"We must not cut off our noses to spite
our faces."
Byrd alsosaid he did not fault U.S. in-
telligence for failing to detect the
presence of Soviet combat troops,
which may have been in Cuba for
several years.
"TO DETERMINE the nationality of
an individual who's wearing a Cuban
uniform is extremely difficult," he
said. "It would probably require
eyeball to eyeball intelligence."

However, he added that con-
sideration should be given to the
resumption of reconnaissance flights
over Cuba.
On other issues, Byrd said he agreed
with the assessment of many of his
West Virginia constituents that Carter,
although a good man, had not done very
well on domestic issues.
"THEY THINK he's a good and
honorable man, but they're not
satisfied as to his performance and they
have doubts about their perception of
his leadership," Byrd said. He added
that he shared that view.
As to reports that the family of Sen.
Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) had lifted
its objection to his possible run for the
presidency, Byrd answered that Ken-
nedy "has given a signal that keeps his
options open."
Some political observers have inter-
pretted the latest reports as an in-
dication that Kennedy is inching toward
an open challenge to Carter for the
Democratic nomination.

Tuesday
September 11
Thursday
September 13

7-8:30 p.m.
7-8:30 p.m.
(Main Hospital entrance)
ask directions at door

f'LACE
6th Level
Amphitheatre
Main Hospital
1405 E. Ann St.

Ale
o r\ i za lwaa( me&4 rign

" +Euesd4& 1, Se 17i
grtad. k1rar'q I'ep5 40

4:00p.

Police baffled in search for
16-year-old MSU sophomore

- 1

(Continued from Page 1)
,posed to be played on paper, but
Egbert's parents say their son was part
of a group that used the MSU steam
tunnels as a setting.
In the game, a "master" creates
dungeons from which other players -
in assorted medieval roles- must
escape,
TWO SIMILAR drawings,'; one in
r chalk and one in dust on a pipe, were
found in one section of the tunnels, Dear
Ssaid.
The concentric circles with wavy
lines were made "within the past mon-
th" but their significance - if any - is
,unknown, he said.
Nothing similar to the shapes has
abeen found in any version of "Dungeons
and Dragons" so far, he said.
"The game is still the most active
clue we have," said Badlgey. Several
self-described psychics are among
more than 100 people who have offered
police tips and clues, he said.
"SOME SAID he was alive, some said
he was dead," Badgley said. Egbert, an
MSU sophomore, is registered for the
fall term which starts in two weeks,
Badgley said.

"Any 16-year-old boy that's in the
position he's in, who has the intellect he
has, is constantly having to challenge
his mind," Badgley said. "He could

become very bored so he has to go to the
bizarre to keep that challenge ... I am
not about to discount the possibility that
he is still alive."

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Michigan League Snack Bar
Grand Opening
NAME THAT-PLACE...
TO THE TUNE OF A $50 MEAL TICKET!
The Most Popular Eating Place On The Campus-
The League Snack Bar
has been. renovated, remodeled, reuvenated!its a Snack Bar and a whole lot mare
so it rotes a brand new name! Visit us on the League lower level (open 7:15
to 4 00). Write your snppv suggestion for o new name and hand it to the cashier
The wnnnq contestant cets a meal ticket worth $50 of grea' eating!

Note These Exciting Features-
tDo-it-yourself salad bar
Honest-to-goodness (;lt l IL Dhamburgers
Health foods
DClicious HOT scups,.chili, Bar- B-Q
Wide be.craa elct ion
Sodaf ourtai h -openpr n 2 to 4 p. at
Watch For The Opening Date Soon!

U OFM

Also enjoy fine food
in the CAFTERIA at the
MICH IGON LEAGUE
227 South Ingalls
Located in the Heart of the Campus .
It Is The Heart of.the Campus!

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