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September 09, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-09

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NEW BREAKFAST IDEA
SWEEPS ANN ARBOR!

Page 2-Sunday, September 9, 1979-The Michigan Daily

313
66

TURTLE ISLAND
natural food restaurant
S. State Breakfast: lam
Lunch: 11 :30a
3-3525 Dinner: 4:3Op
Fri & Sat til 4

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score
a dom
ago,

TEN- YEAR TREND CONTINUES
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores fall again
holasticFrom AP andUPI (AT) A college board report, "National decline has affected students across the indicated schools m
:holastic Aptitude Test (SAT) College-Bound Seniors, 1979," lists bad h study said.cstud coaching shosm
es fell slightly this year, continuing scores and characteristics of about two- MINORITIES AND low-income help some students.
wnward spiral that began a decade thirds of the students beginning college youths of all races generally score 100 The College Board released th
the College Board said yesterday. this fall. onints b l.n+ other findings from a questionna

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PANCAKES

The drop made poor fortune tellers out
of educators predicting an upturn this
year.
The average SAT verbal score dipped
two points to 427 and the SAT math
score dropped one point to 467.
THE MULTIPLE-CHOICE test taken
by one million college-bound seniors is
scored on a scale of 200 to 80. Teniyears
ago, the average verbal score was 463
and math 493. Originally, 500 was sup-
posed to be average.
Many inathe educational establish-
ment within the last year expressed
hope that scores in 1979 would start up
again.

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IT SHOWED also that the average
score for Achievement Tests taken by
the 1979 college-bound drop also
declined for the third consecutive year.
"Achievements" are given in a wide
range of subjects.
Although the test is designed to rate"
students, not schools, the national
decline has been viewed in many quar-
ters as evidence that something is
amiss in American education.
Robert Cameron, a College Board of-
ficial, said the latest decline is "disap-
pointing in light of what many schools
have been doing to improve education."
BUT HE ADDED, "since there are
many causes for the decline, schools
cannot expect to reverse the trend
quickly or single-handedly."
A 1977 College Board study concluded
that a variety of factors, including
television, changes in the family,
relaxed standards, and the turbulence
of Vietnam and Watergate, were to
blame for the drop in SAT scores since
1970.
The top score in each section of the
test is 800. Students in the 700-to-800
range are admitted by the nation's
most selective universities - such as
Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford and
the honors" sections at state univer-
sities.
The increasing numbers of minority
students taking the SAT figured in a
drop before 1970, but since then the

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Detroit schools will open
Monday minus teachers

puiJu . ue1w average on ne LL1 s.
The test has been involved in a con-
troversy recently over whether
coaching increases students' scores.
The College Board maintains that
drills and cramming are not likely to
raise students' scores very much,
because the test measures skills
developed over a long time. But a
recent Federal Trade Commission

given to test-takers:
-Seventeen per cent were
minorities, a record number.
-Males had higher SAT scores, both
verbal and mathematical, than
females.
-The number of. women taking the
SAT exceeded that of men for the fifth
consecutive year.

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By United Press International
Administrators say Detroit's 300
schools will be open tomorrow but the
district's 12,000 teachers planned to be
on picket lines following rejection of a
three-year contract.
One administrator yesterday predic-
ted opening of schools next week in the
213,000-student district - the state's
largest - "will be chaos" with the
teachers not on duty.
THE TEACHERS, members of the
Detroit Federation of Teachers (DFT)
Friday night rejected the proposed pact
on a 5,149 to 4,537 vote. They had been in
classrooms during the first week of the
fall semester.
Some 10,500 teachers in 27 other
districts with 200,000 students remained
on strike going into the second week of

scheduled classes in the state. An ad-
ditional 175 systems were without new
pacts.
DFT President Mary Ellen Riordan
urged acceptance of the contract which
granted Detroit teachers raises of 25
per cent over the life of the agreement.
However, the contract did not contain a
Cost-of-Living Allowance, a key
teacher demand, or a wage reopener
clause.
AFTER THE vote was announced,
Mrs. Riordan said teachers, who had
been in classrooms since school began
this past week, would "withhold ser-
vices" beginning tomorrow.
But School Board President George
Bell said "the schools will be open and
administrators will be there.
"There has been no discussion of
closing the schools by the board
because of a strike," he said.
SCHOOL BOARD member Gerald
O'Neill said the plan to keep the
classrooms open was "ludicrous."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No. 4
Sunday, September 9, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109.Subscription ratest: $12 Septem
ber through April (2 semesters) ; $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer.
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER:Send address.changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

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