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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 06, 1979 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page 12A-Thrsday, September 6, 1979-The Michigan daily

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Daily Photo by LISA KLAUSNER
DENISE SWANBROW, a recently graduated LSA student, and Romances students find jobs both with the University and private firms in the campus
Languages graduate student Michael Milne go over a report for State area.
Security Services, a private firm contracted by the University. Many
Jobs pay little, but easy to find

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By TIM YAGLE
Whether it's to help pay tuition or
just provide some spending money,
many students take on part-time jobs
while studying at the University. The
pay usually isn't great, but one can
usually find a job to fit even the most
unusual schedule.
Many notices of job openings both
within and outside the University are
posted outside the Temporary Em-
ployment Office (TEO) in the Student
Activities Building and in the basement
of the Michigan Union.
The demands for student jobs in some
areas exceeds the supply, said TEO
Director Alice Irwin, recommending
that students not be "too narrow with
their choices. They can't be picky, and
choosy," she said. "Be able to accept a
little less."
APPLICATION FORMS for many
jobs are available at the TEO. Irwin
said the sooner a student fills out an ap-
plication after arriving on campus, the
better the chances of getting an accep-
table job.
In September, 1978, TEO had 4,400
applications on file, with 4,176 openings
subsequently filled.
Employment for those that qualify

can also be obtained through the Work-
Study program. Work-Study coor-
dinator Nancy Longmate said those
jobs are "a form of financial aid that
provides financial aid through em-
ployment." The program has $2.3
million in federal funds available this
fall, Longmate said, adding the jobs
should be plentiful.
She said the average pay for a Work-
Study job is $3.50 with $2.90 the
minimum rate. Students are alloted a
maximum amount of money they may
earn from the program depending on
the special circumstances of the in-
dividual student.

SOME STUDENTS don't even need to
venture beyond their own residence
halls to get a part-time job.
Housing Student Services Director
John Finn said there will be openings in
food services, housekeeping, at the
front desk, and in the libraries in most
halls for students who can work about
10 hours or more per week.
For newcomers, Finn said, pay will
be minimum wage. But for returning
veterans, "the pay is a little higher."
Each hall will hire as many people as,
it deems necessary. "It's mostly first
come, first serve," Finn said.
To obtain these jobs, Finn recom-

mends contacting the appropriate
manager in each hall. Last year, the
dorms experienced trouble finding
enough students to work in the
cafeterias. As a result, some dornm
residents ate off paper plates because
there wasn't enough help to wash the
dishes.
Employers outside the University
also hire many students. "We're hiring
like crazy," said McDonalds hiring
manager Pat Adkins. "You tell us what
hours you want to work, and we'll work
around that," she said. Part-time
workers are started at $2.90 per hour,
she added.

Freshpersons to be affected by
new LSA English requirements

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By SARA ANSPACH
Students entering LSA this year are
the first to be affected by the college's
new writing requirements, approved in
January, 1978 in an effort to strengthen
student writing skills.
The new requirements are part of a
comprehensive program designed to
keep students writing from the time
they enter as freshpersons until they
graduate.
While, n introductory composition

course is standard fare- in most
colleges, LSA's latest requirements go
beyond the single mandatory course in
writing imst shoiols offer. Studehts are
tested at orientation, placed in a
tutorial class if necessary during their
first year, are required to take in-
troductory English composition as a
freshperson, and are asked to select an
advanced'writing course as an upper-
classperson.
LSA PROFESSORS will be providing

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more writing assignments and will 'be
more critical of students' papers, said
Barbara Morris, director of the English
Composition Board (ECB). She -added
that students are encouraged to visit
ECB's writing workshop, which is open
50 hours each week to assist students'
with writing problems.
If a student's orientation writing test
indicates he or she is not ready fors
English 125 (or another class such .as
Great Books or Classical Civilization
which also fulfills the LSA freshperson.
English requirement) the student will
be placed in the mandatory English 100.
A seven week two-credit course,
English 100 (or 101 if it's taken during
the following seven week period) offers
small classes and individual attention
for each student. The teachers are
specially trained to help focus on
student improvements and daily
writing will be required.
AT THE END of the seven weeks,
students are tested again. Those who
pass take an English composition cour-
se next semester. For those who still
need more help, English 101 will be
required. It is possible, said Morris, for
a student to score well enough on the
English 100 post test that he or she will
not be required to take an introductory
English composition course.
Approximately 17 per cent of fresh-
persons and transfer students pass out
of the English composition
requirement. Most, however, take one
of the approximately 90 sections of
English 125 offered each semester. In
the past, teaching methods for the
course have varied, but this fall courses
are "not going to have as much variaw
ce," said Morris, adding a syllabus
provided for teaching assistants which
should ensure less diversity from class.
to class.
Although there are only a few upper-
level writing courses available now-
almost every department will offer one.
by the timetincoming freshpersons are
ready to take them, Morris said..
Students will be encouraged to take a
writing course from the discipline in.
which they are 'majoring, although an
advanced course from any department
will fulfill the requirement, she said.

INTERNATIONAL CENTER
Some things you may not know about us...
NOON-TIME SEMINARS ON GLOBAL CONCERNS
WORLD-WIDE TRAVEL INFORMATION
AREA TRIPS & TOURS
STUDY ABROAD INFORMATION
OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ACTIVITIES

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