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December 11, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Applications Now Being Taken for
the Position of Treasurer of MSA
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION
IS DEC. 12, 1979
There are also openings for positions on the U-Cel-.
lar Board. Pick up Application at MSA Office, 3909
Michigan Union (763-3241).
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION
IS DEC. 7, 1979
abortion?
i Free Pregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
Confidential Counseling
Complete Birth Control Clinic
, Medicaid " Blue Cross
(313) 941-1810 Ann Arbor and
Downriver area
A (313) 559-0590 Southfield area
-, Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc.
N",-M w

Page 2-Tuesday, December 11, 1979-The Michigan Daily
NOBEL WINNER CONDEMNS ABOR TION:

Mothe
From Reuter and AP
OSLO - Mother Teresa, a Roman
Catholic nun who ministers to the
hopeless in the slums of Calcutta,
yesterday received the 1979 Nobel
Peace Prize and condemned abortion
as the greatest destroyer of man in the
world today.
The 69-year-old Albanian-born nun
said she accepted the prize on behalf of
the unwanted, poorest of the poorand
the unhappy people of the world.
IN HER SPEECH, made before Nor-
way's King Olav and invited guests to
the Nobel ceremony, Mother Teresa
said: "To me the nations who have
legalized abortion are the poorest
nations. They are afraid of the unborn
child and the child must die."
She called on the king and the audien-
ce to pray for and to stand by the un-
born child.
Mother Teresa began ministering to
orphans, and the hungry, poor, sick and
dying in Calcutta 30 years ago.
SINCE THEN she has set up an
organization, Missionaries of Charity,
which now feeds and cares for millions
in the United States, Venezuela, Tan-

Teresa accepts

zania, Italy, Australia and Britain,
among other nations.
Prof. John Sannes, chairman of the

Norwegian Nobel Committee presented
Mother Teresa with a check, a Nobel
gold medal and diploma in the after-
noon ceremony at the great frescoed
hall of the University of Oslo.
She declined the traditional Nobel
dinner party, held for some 100 invited
guests and costing about 6,000 dollars.
She asked that the money be given in-
stead to the poor, saying that that
amount could fee some 400 people in
Calcutta for a year.
PRAISING HER three decades of
selfless service to the poor, Sanness
urged that rich nations, in assisting
poorer nations, emulate Mother
Teresa's spirit and respect for in-
dividual human dignity.
"Mother Teresa has personally suc-
ceeded in bridging the gulf that exists
between the rich nations and the poor
nations. Her view of the dignity of man
has built a bridge," Sanness said. "All
aid given by the rich countries must be
given in the spirit of Mother Teresa."
Mother Teresa told the audience,
"Our poor people are great people, a
very lovable people. They don't need

s
award
our pity and sympathy, they need our
understanding love and they need our
respect.
"WE NEED TO tell the poor 'that
they are somebody to us, that they too,
have been created by the same loving
hand of God, to love and be loved,' " she'
said.
The tiny nun, clad in the traditional
sari of India, stood beneath the hall's,2
biblical murals, beamed her radiant
smile and led her listeners in St. Fran-
cis of Assisi's prayer for peace.
Mother Teresa's award closed a
decade of controversial and highly
political peace prizes, on a unifying,
religious note.
FIVE OF THE ten Nobel Prizes han-
ded out here yesterday went to
Americans. Winners also included the
first black to receive the economics
award and the first Moslem honored in
physics.
At the banquet, the winner of the
Nobel Prize in literature, Greek poet
Odysseus Elytis, 68, gave the principal
speech of gratitude for the laureates.

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Mother Teresa
... .condemns abortion

Hostage, intervtiewed on television, says

'V'

embassy captives homesick but treated well

December 13. P11
PRESENTED BY
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(Continued from Page 1)
the all-important broadcast station, but
it was unclear whether the soldiers -
many of them local Azaris - were loyal
to the regional cause or to Khomeini.
For the first time, American officials
indicated they had reason to believe
that some of the hostages may have
been moved from the embassy to other,
TIM'S
and
CHRISTINE'S
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20 Yrs. at the same location
We specialize in fitting
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" NEW ZIPPERS
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Tue., Wed., Thurs., Sat. 8am-6pm
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HAPPY HOLIDAYS
TO ALL STUDENTS AND
TO ALL AMERICANS

unknown locations, it was revealed
yesterday.
THAT DISCLOSURE came at a
hearing of the International Court of
Justice in The Hague, where Attorney
General Benjamin Civiletti appealed
for the court to act speedily to end
Iran's "barbaric" holding, of the
hostages "and save human lives."
The cour cannot enforce its orders,
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No.79
Tuesday, December 11, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesda ythrough Sunday morn-
ings duringthe University year at 420
Maynard Street= Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); $13by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
sessionupublished Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
aid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

but U.S. representatives were hopeful a
decision in favor of the United States
would increase international pressure
on Iran.
Also, Iran's revolutionary leader
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini yester-
day said Jimmy Carter was incapable
of being president of the United States,
and should not be re-elected.
IN THE LATEST of a string of at-
tacks on President Carter, the
Ayatollah said in a broadcast speech
that Mr. Carter had mobilized the
Moslem world against the United
States, and was a traitor to his country.
Khomeini virtually dared the
"brainless" United States to try to
organize an international economic
embargo against Iran.
The clergyman-revolutionary
delivered his blistering attack on Car-
ter as the 50 U.S. Embassy hostages
spent their 37th day in captivity. New
diplomatic intermediaries were
arriving in Tehran, but there was no
sign the Iranians were budging from
their hard-line stand - the shah for the
hostages.

IN PARIS, the United States accused
Japan yesterday of sending "am-
biguous signals" to Iran by buying
boycotted oil and easing the effects of a-
freeze on Iranian assets.
The sudden blast against Japan came
as Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance
sought support from U.S. allies for
strong and united economic retaliation
against Iran if spy trials of the U.S.
hostages begin.
ALWAYS THIRSTY for oil, Japanese
companies stepped in to buy up the'
shipments spurned by the United)
States, at $40 a barrel on the volatile
spot market, and japanese bankers;
helped Iran ease the effect of the freeze
of assets in American banks.
Richard Cooper, undersecretary of-
state for economic affairs, and then'
Vance, took up the U.S. complaint with'
Japanese Foreign Minister Subaro
Okita, who was here for an Inter-
national Energy Agency meeting. U.S.
spokesman Hodding Carter described
the talks as "candid."

(.RIAV1() %KS MIH., ROCILSFER. %1(If16A \.

INS completes 'U interview;
8 Iranian students'deportable

'. 4
r

VICTORY
WISHES
FOR THE

GATORBOWL
From Your Friends at Big Daddy's
Join the party people at Big Daddy's Lounge for pre- and post-
Gator Bowl celebrations. It's the place to be in Jacksonville,
Florida. Big Daddy's features multi-levels, a custom built sound
and light system, plus disco and live entertainment.
*

(Continued from Page 1)
students not interviewed in Ann Arbor
must report to INS headquarters in
Detroit for their interviews by this
Friday.
ling Lee Year End Sale
CANNED and DRY GOODS
10% off on $5 plus Purchase
20% off on $10 plus Purchase
407 N. FIFTH-KERRYTOWN

"They have until the 14th," said
Wagus, and added that if the remaining
students don't report for interviews
they "will be classified deportable"
without exception.
According to University Foreign
Student Advisor Charlene Schmult, 250
was the original estimate given to INS,
but the actual number of Iranian
University students may be closer to
225.
Though they provided INS with the
original estimate of 250 Iranian studen-

.

Ippy
idays

ts, University officials refused to
provide INS with a list of Iranians
students on campus, because theyt
didn't want the University to be,
associated with the interviews, and
wanted to emphasize their concern for
the students.
A TEAM OF INS officers, currently
in Lansing, has spent the last few weeks
traveling to state colleges and univer-
sities conducting interviews. Beforej
coming to Ann Arbor, the team found 10:,
of 129 Iranian Eastern Michigan
University students deportable and 39,
to require further investigation.
According to Schmult, the proportion;
of University students interviewed and.
found to be violating their visas is much
lower than the proportion at other
schools visited so far

Pam"er

Some
one
Ulrich's carries
a complete selection of

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