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December 02, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-02

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, December 2, 1978--Page 3

Fs1OU SEE NE6WIEN CALL.DAJY
Counting votes
When justices from the LSA academic judiciary met in closed
session Thursday night to recount the votes from last week's LSA-SG
elections, they were surprised to find 12 more votes than were counted
originally. LSA-SG officials had no idea where the 12 votes came from.
They did announce, however, that the election was certified, and the
results were the same as before. The recount was ordered by the
academic judiciary after members of the United Students party
officially challenged the election on Tuesday because of alleged
"irregularities" in vote counting. They dropped the suit Wednesday,
but not before the student court had ruled in their favor. Thursday
night, immediately before the recount, the justicesannounced their
decision to proceed with it. PAC members Bob Stechuk and Kathy
Friedman won the presidency and vice-presidency respectively. Other
winners were: Michael Epstein, Dee Ghosh, Mary Hallesy, Gregory
Irvin, Bruce Kozarsky, Val Mims, Pamela-Martin, Talib Mugsi, Mark
Slaughter, Dan Solomon, Mike Spurnak, Doug Steinberg, Davrell
Tien, Larry Vadnais, Robert Warren.
Student apathy wins again
Results from this week's Rackham Student Government elections
are in. Of the 7,401 students enrolled in Rackham, only 127 voted. This
is up from 60 voters in last year's fall election, but down from last
winter when over 200 Rackham students cast their ballots in the MSA
elections. Several students were catapulted into'the Council by one-
vote write-in mandates. "It's not clear they even want it," said
Elections Director Harriet Strasberg. "We haven't contacted the
write-in winners yet.' The winners in the two-day election are:
Michael Donahue and Ashok Katdare in Division I, who received 16
and 15 votes respectively; in Division II, Lawrence Davis won with
nine votes, and four write-in candidates, Jeff Berkowitz, Donald
Bittner, J. Brian Conrey, and Ray Hunt, each received one write-in
vote and must split two vacant half-year seats; Carol Yorkievits won
Division III with a whopping 54 votes; there were no candidates in
Division IV, but two students, John Pena and Richard Sax, each
received a write-in and are eligible for the two vacant seats and Mark
Shermis was catapulted into office in Division V with seven votes.
CRISP crunch cured
You may or may not have noticed it, but there has been a route
change in the CRISP registration lines. For two years, waiting
CRISPees have made their last stand on the second floor of the Old
Architecture and Design building before entering the computer
labrynth to register. This year, however, the lines had to be moved
downstairs, because the Center for Afro-American Studies has taken
over the second and fourth floors of the building. According to Tom
Karunas, a CRISPy critter, the noise from the waiting lines would
disturb the people working in the now-occupied offices. "Actually, it's
a lot better than before," he said, referring to the change. "We have
better air circulation down there, better lighting, and more room. The
students are separated into three lines, and sent upstairs ten at a time
to keep the fire marshall happy. The process has been speeded up a
little." So much for the CRISP crunch.
Urodynamics
"Urodynamics" was the subject of a three-day conference held in
Chicago recently to examine new trends in treating diseases and
dysfunctions of the urinary tract. University Hospital physicians
played a dominant role, holding the floor for practically an entire day.
We wonder how much of their "research data" ends up down the
drain.
Take ten
The bloody street violence during the August Democratic National
Convention sparked a 345-page report to a presidential commission
released on December 2, 1968. The report called for "prompt and
severe action" against offending members of the Chicago police force.
Mayor Richard Daley termed the overall report excellent, but said the
summary conclusion reached was misleading, adding that he was
proud of the behavior of most of the policemen on his force.
Happenings
FILMS
Cinema II - The Turning Point, 7, 9p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - Key Largo, 7, 9:05 p.m., Old A&D.
Mediatrics - Shoot the Piano Player, 7, 8:40, 10:20 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Aud.
Ann Arbor Film Coop - Hitchcock night, Foreign Correspondent,
7, 10:20 p.m.; Psycho, 8:40 p.m., Aud 3, MLB.
Couzens Film Coop - Silver Streak, 8, 10:30 p.m., Couzens
cafeteria.
East Quad Midnight Cinema - Black Orpheus, midnight, R. C.,

Aud.
PERFORMANCES
Jerry the Fool in an evening of mime and story-telling, 8:30 p.m.,
Canterbury Loft, 332S. State.
PTP - Shakespeare's Richard II, 2 p.m., POwer Center.
Musical Society - "Messiah", 8:30 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
Ark - John Allen Cameron, Cape Breton Fiddlers, 9 p.m., 1421
Hill.
Music School - New World Quartet, 3 p.m., SM Recital Hall.
Music School - Contemporary Directions Ensemble, 8 p.m.,
Rackham.
Actor's Ensemble - Ionesco's Macbett, 8 p.m., Arena Theatre,
Frieze.
SPEAKERS
Asian American Student Night - David Louie, assist. News
Director WXYZ-TV, Detroit, "Asian Americans for a Fair Media," 8
p.m., Pendleton Room, Union.
Biomedical Research - Research forum, Geoffrey Burnstock,
University College, London, William Kelley, "Biology of Nucleosides
and Clinical Applications," 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Sheldon Aud.
ISMRRD - "Teaching Disabled Children How to Learn," (For
parents), 9 a.m., 130 S. First St.
Center, Japanese Studies - Symposium on Zenga and Nanga
Painters, 10 a.m., Angell Aud. A.
MISCELLANEOUS
Annual Galens Medical Society Tag Day, (last day).
University BFA Show, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Slusser Gallery, North
Campus.
Friends of Ann Arbor Public Library Book Sale, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
Hardbacks $1.00, paperbacks 50c.
Artist, Craftsmen Guild - "Christmas Art Fair," 10 a.m. to 8
p.m., Sports Coliseum, corner of Fifth and Hill Streets.
Dance - Sr. Dance majors, "Points of View," 8 p.m., 310 N.
University Ct.
U-M Folklore Society - square, contra dancing, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Gomberg House/Stockwell Dorm - campus semi-formal dance,
with Special Guest, 9 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Ann Arbor Center for Independent, Living - workshop on

Fuel shortage cuts Shell

Many of Shell's 18,400 gasoline
stations have decided to cut back
operating hours in the wake of an an-
nouncement by the nation's largest
gasoline marketer that it is short of
fuel.
More than two dozen Shell dealers
polled at random yesterday said they
were limiting their hours, and some are'
laying off employees because of the
supply problem announced Thursday.
OTHER MAJOR companies say they
have no plans to match Shell's move,

but acknowledge they are having
trouble keeping up with the high
gasoline demand created by
widespread mild fall weather that ex-
tended the summer driving season long
past the traditional Labor Day fall-off.
Repair shutdowns at two Shell
refineries aggravated the problem.
Shell, with eight per cent of the
nation's 200,000 service stations, is
limiting dealers' gasoline supplies to
about 75 per cent of previous amounts.
"It will make quite a bit of differen-

ce," said Jim Minton, manager of a
Shell station in Indianapolis. "I'll have
to cut my hours by about half, close on
Sundays and close no later than 8 p.m.
It's going to be bad for me."
"I DON'T totally understand the
reasons," said Wayne Weinshreider,
owner of a Cleveland station. "But I
understand that I will have to close my
night shift. I was open 24 hours. I'll
have to lay off a lot of employees."
According to Shell, the shortage could
last through early January.
"Demand for Shell gasoline has not
only failed to taper off, but has actually
increased to record levels," said Shell
spokesman Norman Altstadter.
Part of the cutback plan includes
limiting the amount of unleaded
gasoline a dealer can get to 38 per cent
of total supply. Many dealers say
unleaded accounts for more than half of
their sales. Unleaded demand has risen
by more than 10 per cent this year com-

supply
pared to three per cent for all types of
gasoline, the American Petroleum In-
stitute reports.
LIGHT SUPPLIES could continue in
the spring and summer if demand stays
high and refineries are unable to
produce sufficient reserves for peak
driving months. The petroleum in-
stitute says inventories are 13 per cent
behind last year.
The industry says last year's supply
was high because demand for home
heating oil during the winter of 1976-77
led to increased production of gasoline,
which is produced along with heating
oil. Gasoline supplies were back to
normal this year, the company said,
because heating oil production was
near normal last winter.
Government officials yesterday said
the tight supply situation came unex-
pectedly and it would have been dif-
ficult for oil companies to have created
it as a means of hiking prices.

EXECUTION SET FOR THURSDAY:
Firing squad sought

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Prison of-
ficials said yesterday they are
recruiting marksmen to carry out the
firing-squad execution of two convicted
killers, scheduled for next Thursday at
sunrise.
Failing a stay by the Utah or U.S.
Supreme Court, Dale S. Pierre, 25, of
Brooklyn, N.Y., and William A. An-
drews, 24, of Dallas, will be shot at 7:38
a.m. local time on the grounds of the
Utah State Prison. They were convicted
in the torture slayings of three persons
during a robbery of a hi-fi store four
years ago.
THEY'RE FAIRLY down and con-
fess to be very concerned. They don't
want to die and I'm sure they're
discouraged," Andrews' attorney, John
T. Caine, said yesterday.
Deputy Warden Kenneth Shulsen
said officials have "Made some contac-
ts in our recruitment of personnel for
the firing squad, but we're not sure now
there will be two squads or what."
Shulsen refused to divulgespecifics
of how the recruiting was being carried
out, or how many persons would make
up the firing squad, and declined to say
if the executions would be simultaneous
or one after the other.
BUT HE SAID Pierke and Andrews
would not die in the same building
where Gary Gilmore was executed on
January 17, 1977. The former cannery
has been turned into a vocational
training center.
So far, lawyers for Pierre and An-
drews have been unable to get a judge
to stop the executions. The State
Supreme Court has turned them down
and the U.S. Supreme Court refused to
review their case.
On Thursday, District Court Judge
James S. Sawaya stunned the attorneys
by denying a request for postponement.
Caine said he had been sure Sawaya
would grant the stay because a day
earlier he put off the January 3
execution of another Death Row in-

mate.
"WE KNOW now that we can't rely
on anyone in the State of Utah because
they're bowing to public pressure. I am
confident, however, there will not be an
execution on Thursday," Caine said.
Shortly after Sawaya ruled, the
lawyers went to one justice of the Utah
Supreme Court and he granted a stay.
But, in an unusual twist, Chief Justice
A.B. Ellett called all justices together
and they voted four to one to overrule
the stay decision and instead scheduled
a hearing for 2 p.m. Monday.

II
4
U j
I'$
(I)
5--
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(I)

I . . .L' ' " i 0
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1:.25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. til 1:36 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtirne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.
It was the Deltas
against the rules...
the rules lost! 10:40
1:15
3:30
NATIONAL 6:15
SLAMPOON 9:00
SAMAL 11:00

I

By William Shakespeare
NOV 29 - DEC.3
Power Center
TON ITE and
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
PTP Guest Artist Series
Box Office hours in
Power Center:
Sat. 1-5 8 6-8pm;
Sun. 12-2 pm 763-3333
Tickets also at all Husn's
Ticket Outlets.

10:30
1:00
3:45
7:00
9:30-

JOHN HUSTON'S 1948
HUMPHREY BOGART backs down from EDWARD G. ROBINSON, and LAUREN
BACALL and LIONEL BARRYMORE don't understand why-at first. The tough
ex-GI and the former bigshot gangster come face to face in a shut dawn hotel
on a sweaty Florida key. Huston directs in a very polished way to set off the
inevitable scenes of violence, including nature's--a savage hurricane. The
opening shot of Edward G. mouthing a cigar, sweltering naked in a tub of
cold water is one of the most powerful entrances of a character on record.
SUN: Varda's ONE SINGS, THE OTHER DOESN'T

A

A ROBERT ALTMAN FILM
"A WEDDING"
IN ALWHAOUI({C AM)DE
DESI ARNAZ1R. CAROL BURNETT GERALDINE CHAPLIN HOWARD DUFF
MIA FARROW VITTOIUO GASSMAN ULLIAN'GISH LAUREN HUTTON
VIVECA UNDFORS PAT McCORMICK DINA MERRILL NINA VAN PALLANDT

10 15
12:30
3:00
7:15
9:45
nri

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

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EISI I IONS FO1l lIEN

'Tis the year for you to get into Bass.
Celebrate. Rejoice. In shoes that
suit your suit. Or jeans. Or cords.
Shoes you can live in. Good looks,
r- ' - - D -

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