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December 02, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-02

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Page 2-Saturday, December 2, 1978-The Michigan Daily

e r

Church Worship S ervices

CARTER PLAN WORKING?
Dollar makes comeback

7R1 11 OR

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Thursday-7:30 p.m.-A study group
on Medical ethics.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and Jus-
tice-9:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper-6:00 p.m.-Special
surprise program following the meal at
7:00. Everyone is invited.
Monday Night Bible Study on North
Campus-8:00 p.m.
* * * .
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 p.m.-Evening Worship.
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, Dec. 3-Topic
title: "Are you planning on living the
rest of your life?" by Margaret
Guenther.
"All life is an experiment. The more
experiments you make, the better."
-R.W. Emerson.
* * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 am.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.-
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sqgth State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors 'pograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.

STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
,p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Broyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowski, Office Manager
Sunday-5:00-Song practice.
Sunday-5:30-9:00 p.m.-
ADVENT PROCLAMATION
Worship
Shared meal
Decorating large Christmas tree and
Wesley Lounge.
Friday, Dec. 8 at 7:30 p.m.-Caroling
Holiday Party featuring the Morris
Dance Troupe in the Wesley lounge.
All are warmly invited to join us in
welcoming the Holiday Season.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship :
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship--11:00 am.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson--663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
$aturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorced Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m .-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9! 15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Rev. Jitsuo Morikawa
Worship-10 a.m.-Installation of the
new Rev. Jitsuo Morikawa. Observance
of the Lord's Supper.
11 a.m.-Reception for Rev. Jitsuo
Morikawa in the Fellowlship Hall of
the church. No Bible Seminar this
week.
8 p.m.-Student Fellowship meeting
at the Kachel's.
* * *
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services :
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study--7:30 p.m.
Koinonia 5
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation : 662-9928

LONDON (AP) - The dollar, driven
to record lows for more than a year, has
rallied strongly on world money
markets in the month since President
Carter took drastic action to defend the
American currency. The rally con-
tinued yesterday as the dollar rose
against all major currencies.
But there was widespread belief
among money dealers that the United
States still needs to win its battle again-
st inflation and cut back it§ ever-bigger
foreign trade deficits before the dollar
will climb back to its levels of even a
year ago.
AS THE DOLLAR has turned up-
ward, the price of gold sank.
In London yesterday it closed at
$194.75 an ounce, a slight improvement
on Thursday's $193.25, but $52 below

bullion's all-time high in London of
$245.25, reached Oct. 30, just before
Carter's moves. In Zurich, gold closed
yesterday at $194.875 an ounce, up from
Thursday's $193.375. The Oct. 30 rate in
Zurich was $242.875.
Carter moved on two fronts on Nov. 1
in defense of the currency, ordering an
almost unprecedented squeeze on
credit to fight inflation at home and set-
ting up a $30-billion war chest to defend
the dollar in world money markets. The
$30-billion defense fund is being used to
buy up dollars offered for sale. When
dollars are offered for sale in currency
markets and nobody buys them, the ex-
change rate goes down. Conversely,
when there are dollar buyers around,
the rate goes up.
BY late yesterday, the campaign had

brought the dollar back up 16 per centir
relation to the Swiss franc, 13 per cen
against the Japanese yen, 10 per cen
against the West German mark anc
seven per cent against the Britisl-
pound.
In Tokyo yesterday, where trading
ends a few hours before it begins ir
Europe, the dollar moved above the 200-
yen mark for the first time in 19 weeks
and closed at 201.25 yen. That was a rise
of seven yen on the week and 3/2 yer
from Thursday. The dollar on Oct. 3l
was worth 176.075 Japanese yen,b a
postwar low.
Tokyo dealers attributed much of the
dollar's strength to an announcement o
a sharp drop in Japan's foreign trade
surplus for the first 20 days of Noven-
ber.

A 2dos wouldn't advertise even
if AMA sanctions were lifted

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
Although the American Medical
Association (AMA) has come under fire
for forbidding its member physicians to
advertise their services, some Ann Ar-
bor doctors say they wouldn't advertise
if they could.
"I don't think we should advertise,"
said thoracic (chest) surgeon Dr. Carl
Fischer. "It diminishes from the
professionalism of the physician. Good
physicians shouldn't have to adver-
tise."
FISCHER SAID he figured a
majority of area doctors would not ad-
vertise. "They would really be hungry
for patients," Fischer pointed out. "It'll
bring out the hucksters."
He said it's possible that doctors
publicizing their services could create
a price war. Fischer expressed hope

that some sort of national health
program would relieve the burden of
soaring medical costs on American
consumers.
Obstetrics and gynecology specialist
Dr. Charles Newton claimed there is no
need for advertising because "a patient
will gain confidence in the doctor by
seeing him. An ad won't do that."
FEDERAL TRADE Commission
(FTC) Judge Ernest Barnes, who
issued the ruling stating that the AMA
couldn't restrict competition amongh
its member physicians, said the AMA'a
practices have the effect of placing "a
formidable impediment to competition
in the delivery of health care services
by physicians in this country."
Barnes found the ethical restrictions
on advertising seek to prevent any doc-
tor from presenting his name to the

public in such a way that "sets him
apart from other physicians."
A cosmetic surgeon who asked to
remain anonymous said, "I've known
it's been coming." He said doctors who
frequently advertise in California
(where it's legal) are seen as "u
scrupulous operators."
HE ADDED he wouldn't go to a
lawyer based on any information ap
advertisement gave him and he
wouldn't go just because the lawyer
displayed cheaper rates. He would con-
sult a certain lawyer based on friends'
recommendations, as others probably
would.
"I don't think anyone should be
restricted from doing it," the.plastic
surgeon said. Even so, "It's frowned
upon by society," for doctors to adver-
tise.

Pot as. medicine legal in N.M.

SANTA FE, N.M. (UPI) - The
ifederal government yesterday allowed
New Mexico to become the first state in
the country to distribute marijuana to
cancer chemotherapy patients for con-
trol of pain and nausea.
The secretary of the state Depar-
tment of Health and Environment said
officials of the Food and Drug, Ad-
ministration told his office that the first
shipment of federally produced dope

will be sent to the state Monday.
It is the first state research program
of its kind to be approved by the FDA.
Federal approval still is pending for a
program to use the drug in the treat-
ment of glaucoma patients, Dr. George
Goldstein said.
Thechemotherapy project approval
came exactly five months to the day af-
ter tl,1978 New Mexico legislature
passed a law authorizing it.

t
t
i

He said the drug will be supplied by
the national drug abuse center in the
form of joints and capsules containin
tetrahydrocannabinol -THC +
marijuana's active ingredient.
CETA Laces

~Do

a Tree a Favor: Recycle Your Daily-

AVOID THE RUSH!
B-

a..a.,.aa
r - , _

1. ' '
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DOORWRYS TO ENCHANTMENT
An evening of Mime and Story-telling
with Jerry the Fool
Friday and Saturday, Dec. 1 and 2
8:30 PM at Canterbury Loft
332 South State Street, second floor
donationsonl v
FRIENDS OF THE ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
BOOK SALE
DECEMBER 1, 2 and 4, 1978
Dec. 1: Friday All Hardbacks .... $1.00
9cam to 9 pm Paperbacks'. . . . . . . . .50
Dec. 2: Saturday All Hardbacks .... $1.00
9 am to 6 pm Paperbacks ........ .50
Dec. 4: Monday-9 am to 2 pm: HALF PRICE
2 pm to6 pm: FINALE: BAG FULL $3-
ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
5th at William

Buy, sell or trade your books through The
Michigan Daily BOOK EXCHANGE
A two line ad will cost only $1
50C for each additional line.
All BOOK EXCHANGE ads will appear in The Daily

(Continued from Page )
panding defense spending while
reducing the deficit to no more than $30
billion in his 1980 budget. The 1979
budget deficit is estimated at about $46
billion.
CETA HAS become a 'target for
budget cutters because of frequent
allegations of abuse and a significant
drop in the unemployment rate from a
recession high of nine per cent in 1975 to
5.8 per cent now. In addition, it is one of
the few large federal programs where
spending is not required by law or long
tradition, such as Social Security.

D~ai ly Of c(i(1l Bulleti'
SATURDAY.DECEMBE2. 178
Daily Calendar:
Biomedical Research: Geoffrey Burnstock
University CollegesLondon"'Biology of Nucleosides 4
& Clinical Applications,' Sheldon Aud., 8:30a.m.
ISMRRD: "Teaching Disabled Children How to
Learn," 130 s. First, 9a.m.
Ctr. on Japanese Studies: Symposium on Zenga
and Nanga Painters. Aud. A, Angell, 10 a.m.
Music School: New World Quartet. SM Recital
Hall, :3 p.m.: Contemporary Directions Ensemble.
Rackham.8p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No. 71
Saturday. December'2, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the U niversity
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 4810,.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the university year at 420 Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor. Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April 12 semesters) ;$13 by marl.
outsidle Anni Arbor.
Summer session publ shed Tuesday throu h
Saturday morning. Subscriptiorl rates: $6.50 in Ann
Ai'bor: $7,00 by m nailI outsidle Ann Arbor.!

Saturday, December 9,

1 978.

Come in personally to The Daily, located next to the Student Activities
Building, on the second floor. All ads must be turned in before 5 p.m.
Thursday, December 7, 1978.
Or fill out the form below and mail it to: BOOK EXCHANGE
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

"I

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

r------------- ----- ------------a--
Mail to: BOOK EXCHANGE
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
. f
i "
I- I---I
4 I

It is not the object of this column to satisfy profane
curiosity, or try to answer difficult questions concerning
doctrines which good and faithful servants of God have
differed and disputed down through the ages. Turning aside
to discuss interesting but not essential matters was probably
the cause the world was plunged into what history calls the
Dark Ages. There are Celestial things and Truths concerning
God and the Spirit World which have not been revealed to
men: "The secret things belong unto the Lord our God: But
these which are revealed belong unto us and our children
forever, that we may do all the words of this Law." Deut.
29:29.
The object of these articles is to bring you face to face with

heart by the Holy Spirit, and Jesus Christ is the Mediator,
with the result that the soul so blessed desires to "trust and
obey" and seeks to honor and please God.
it is the testimony of this column and writer that there be
many who call themselves Christian, claiming great spiritual
experiences and that they have been "born again," yet don't
hesitate to run rough shod over some of the Ten Com-
mandments-which reveal the very character of the
Almighty-making the Law void, and then "pass the buck" to
the Lord Jesus Christ, saying He kept the Law for them and
paid their penalty for sin, and made them free with the liberty
to do as they pleasel My answer to folks with such a faith can
best be made by quoting a few verses from the 119th Psalm:
53. 70 and 115: "Horror hath taken hold upon me because of

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