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November 29, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-29

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Page 2-Wednesday, November 29, 1978-The Michigan Daily
AVOID THE R USH!
$OOiKSTORE
Buy ;sell or trade your books through The
Michigan Daily BOOK EXCHANGE
A two line ad will cost only $1
50C for each additional line.
All BOOK EXCHANGE ads will appear in The Daily
Saturday, December 9, 1978.
Come in personally to The Daily, located next to the Student Activities
Building, on the second floor. All ads must be turned in before 5 p.m.
Thursday, December 7, 1978.
Or fill out the form below and mail it to: BOOK EXCHANGE
420 Maynard St.

Mao attacked in Peking poster

TOKYO (AP)-Another wall poster
attacking Mao Tse-tung, went up ir
Peking yesterday within 24 hours of
Vice Premier Teng Hsiao-ping's
suggestion that critics should lay off of
the "great helmsman" who died two
years ago.
Thousands of Chinese gathered
yesterday night in Tienanmen Square
to demand more political and economic
democracy and the rehabilitation of
some leaders cashiered during Mao's
Cultural Revolution of the late 1960s.
JAPAN'S KYODO news service said
the latest anti-Mao poster, signed by
restaurant workers, accused Mao of
making the state his own property, like
a feudal king.
The poster queried the ned to fire
former Chairman Liu Shao-chi during
the 1966-67 Cultural Revolution simply
because he disagreed with Mao over
matters of policy.
Teng, 74, was himself a victim of Mac
and radicals led by Mao's wife, Chiang
Ching, and was disgraced and demoted
in the cultural purge. Restored in 1973,
he fell from grace a second time in 1976.
But he has been back in power since
July 1977.
THE FIRST attacks on the once-
sacred image of Mao came two weeks
ago, followed by flurries of wall posters
in the same vein.
Teng was quoted yesterday by
China's official Hsinhua news agency
as saying the right to conduct the wal
poster campaign is guaranteed by the
constitution and describing the posters
as an expression of democracy ap
proved by the Communist Party.
Though Teng admits Mao made
mistakes, which are being corrected
he paid tribute to the old revolutionary

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in an interview Monday with American
newspaper columnist Robert Novak.
SAYING THERE wouldn't be a
Communist China without Mao, he ad-
ded that China's current industrial
drive must be guided by Mao's thought.
Teng was quoted as saying he was of-
fered the premiership, which Party
Chairman Hua Kuo-feng holds con-
currently, 18 months ago but turned it
down and doesn't want it now.
Many of the posters suggested Teng
should replace Hua as premier and
questioned the role the disgraced
"Gang of Four," led by Mao's widow,
may have had in naming Hua to the job.
Hua was Mao's hand-picked successor
and took over in 1976 when the radicals
had considerable influence and Teng
was in disgrace.
China's powerful Central Committee

is reportedly meeting in Peking, which
could affect the position of high-ranking
communists. But Novak quoted Teng as
saying there would be no purges at the
meeting.
The posters have ranged far and wide
in criticisms of China's stormy political
past. Liu Shao-chi, the arch-villain of
the cultural purge, and former Defense
Minister Peng Teh-huai, fired in 1959
for defying Mao's economic policies,
have been pictured in a more favorable
light.
The poster campaign reflects moves
in other directions to liberalize the
militant, spartan life in China.
The official party organ Peking
People's Daily, has called for new civil,
penal and criminal codes, saying codes
adopted in the.1950s no longer were
adequate and don't protect the rights of
the masses.

Irregularities'cause
LSA elect-ion recount

(Continued from Page 1)

Ann Arbor, MI 48109

--------- --------------1
I
Mail to: BOOK EXCHANGE
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
I-- -
12 _
Name - -_
Address-
City . ............ .... . . ......State Zip Code -
-Phone No.
$1 for 2 lines, 50C for each additional line
#.All ads must be pre-paid
DEADLINE: DECEMBER 7, 1978
L- - --- ------------ - -----------

seated only four members because the
ballotsewere tallied incorrectly. Other
Ymembers of the party also charged that
Strasberg did not understand the coun-
ting procedure used to distribute votes
in the preferential voting system used
in LSA-SG elections.
LSA VOTERS cast votes for candid-
tes on a preferential basis by ranking
their choices for seats on the LSA
Executive Council. The complicated
Stallying procedure allows for the
redistribution of the first place votes a
candidate receives over a quota needed
to insure his election to the candidates
below him in order of preference.
United Students members said the
"increment"-the proportion of first
place votes over the quota divided by
the number of first place votes
received-'some of their candidates
received was incorrectly calculated.
This, members said, caused the
possibility that United Students can-
didate Bianca Johnson, who placed six-
teenth in the race for the fifteen council
seats, might have been seated.
Johnson charged Strasberg with
disorganization in the counting of the
votes. "The election director did not
know how to calculate what percent
each vote was worth," Johnson said.
'At 8:00 in the morning she took out a
(LSA-SG) Constitution and couldn't
figure it out."
UNITED STUDENTS members also
questioned the removal of some ballots
from the counting room during the
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No.68
Wednesday, November 29, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Publishedsdaily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor. Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April <2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor: $7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

tabulating procedure for the purpose of
validation.
Strasberg acknowledged the mem-
bership of some students in LSA was:
validated by phone outside the counting:
room becasue these students were not,
listed in the phone books officials used:
to verify the 1300 ballots. But Strasberg-
defended the procedure as justified by!
LSA election rules.
In response to claims that alcohol and;
marijuana may have impaired the;
ability of the officials to count the"
ballots, Strasberg said,"I didn't drink:
any alcohol all night. I took a couple off
hits off a joint."
LSA-SG Vice-President Jim Sullivan,
who helped count ballots during the"
marathon session, also denied being af-
fected.
"I CERTAINLY - was not drunk,"
Sullivan said. "It is possible that I had;
one drink. I don't think anyone was,
drunk."
Current LSA-SG President Dick
Brazee also denied being intoxicated,:
though he did say he drank about "half:
a glass of whiskey" during the counting;
session. Prazee said the role of liquor;
and marijuana was "greatly:
exaggerated."
"The idea we were intoxicated is ab-:
surd," he said.
Brazee said he felt "there were;
several attempts at physical in-
timidation" by United Students mem-;
bers during the ballot count.
But United Students executive coun-
cil candidate Talib-Udin Abdul Mugsit
characterized the allegation of physical
intimidation as "a blatant lie."
But Brazee said there were "several
other incidents besides the one he
(Slaughter) is concerned about," but
declined to elaborate..
Another candidate, who asked not to
be identified, said the United Students
were responsible for numerous election
code violations.

WINTER SALE
Dec. 3, 9am-3pm
201 Hill St.

A

L.

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!.;1
.n "
" b

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 1978/79 OFFICIAL
ROSE BOWL
STUDENT and FACULTY/STAFF TOUR
DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3
SPECIAL BOWL TOUR OFFICE

I

UM STUDENT UNION
Main Lobby-- Ticket Central. Phone: 763-0070

SCHEDULE FOR SALE OF TOURS
WED.-FRI. Nov. 29-Dec. 1.................9 AM-6PM
SAT. Dec. 2............................9 AM-3 PM
SUN. Dec. 3....... ...... . ..............Closed
MON.-PRI. Dec. 4-8.......................9 AM-6 PM
SALES CLOSE DECEMBER 8
Final documents may be picked up in the main lobby of the U-M Student Union
on December 14, 15 and 16.

SPECIAL SALES

I

IIA

UM FLINT
Classroom Office Bldg. (CROB)
Main Floor near theatre
December 4-10 AM-6 PM
(313) 762-3434

UM DEARBORN
Hallway of Student Activities Bldg.
December 5-10 AM-6 PM
(313) 593-5540

STUDENT $439.00
BASED ON 3 OR 4 PERSONS TO A ROOM
INCLUDED TOUR FEATURES:.
Charter air transportation from Detroit to, San Francisco and return
from Los Angeles including complimentary meals and soft drinks.
" Accommodations for 6 nights based on 3 anSI 4 persons to a room. Your
first three nights will be at the HOLIDAY INN CHINATOWN in fabulous
Son Francisco, and your remaining three nights at the HYATT HOUSE
HOTEL located at the Los Angeles International Airport.
" All transfers between airports, hotels and train stations by private
motorcoach, including luggage directly to your room.
* Transportation from San Francisco to Los Angeles on Southern Pacific's
"ROSE BOWL EXPRESS" train along the magnificent California coastline.
" New Year's Eve Party-cash bar.
" Game Day Package featuring private motorcoach transportation from
your hotel to the Tournament of Roses Parade, a grandstand seat at the
parade, transportation to the game, picnic box lunch, game ticket.
transportation back to the hotel.
OPTIONAL ACCOMMODATIONS
AS FOLLOWS:
" Double Accommodations (2)............$32 PP addl.
Single Accommodations (1) ...............$98 PP addl.
LAND ONLY PACKAGE ...............$214.00
(includes all tour features except air transportation)
AIR ONLY PACKAGE .................$225.00
(limited space only) includes air transportation from Detroit to San Fran-
cisco, Los Angeles to Detroit, and transfers to from the hotels
DOES NOT INCLUDE TRANSPORTATION FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO LOS
ANGELES.

FACULTY/STAFF

$497.00

BASEDON
DOUBLE OCCUPANCY

INCLUDED TOUR FEATURES:
" Charter air transportation from Detroit to San Francisco and return from
Los Angeles including Complimentary meals and soft drinks.
" Accommodations for 6 nights based on two persons to a room. Your
4 first three nights will be at the HOLIDAY INN CHINATOWN in fabulous
San Francisco, and your remaining three nights at the HYATT HOUSE
HOTEL LOCATED AT THE Los Angeles International Airport.
" All transfers between airports, hotels and train stations by private
motorcoach, including luggage directly to your room.
* Air transportation from San Francisco to Los Angeles on scheduled air-
lines.
" New Year's Eve Party.
" Game Day Package featuring private motorcoach transportation from
your hotel to the Tournament of Rosed Parade, a grandstand seat
at the parade, transportation to the game, picnic box lunch, game
TICKET. TRANSPORTATION BACK TO THE HOTEL.
OPTIONAL ACCOMMODATIONS
AS FOLLOWS:
" Single Accommodations (1).............................$98 PP addl.
" Triple Accommodations, deduct for
3rd person only.............................................$34
LAND ONLY PACKAGE ...............$272.00
(includes all tour features except air transportation)
AIR ONLY PACKAGE .................$225.00
(limited space only) includes air transportation from Detroit to San Fran-

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