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November 22, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-22

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, November 22, 1978-Page 3

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;F YOU SEE Wv4S Wn ~E1CL 6DNLY

Frosh discover natural resources

Takden
Ten yes ago, just before the game against OSU in Columbus, Ron
Johnson id to a Daily reporter: "I have no worries about the Ohio
State gae. They're just the same as we are; they're not supermen.
They eaie same food, breath the same air as we do. I'm tired of all
this talkbout how much better they are. I don't like the way people
will posthe questiuon: Do you think you have a chance to beat OSU?
They seneto imply that Ohio State is much tougher than we." Well,
OSU watougher that year and Blue hopes were dashed, 50-14. This
weekenc however, let's hope the Ann Arbor supermen settle that
score.
Hapenings
WEDNESDAY
FILMS
Cinenr Guild-Foreign Correspondent, Old A & D, 7,9:05 p.m.
THURSDAY
MISCELLANEOUS
Tham giving dinner at Zehnder's in Frankenmuth. Sign up in
advanc in Room 18 of the International Center. Cost is $8.00.
FRIDAY
FILMS
Cinna II-Beauty and the Beast, Aud. A, Angell, 7, 9p.m.
Cinea Guild-The Third Man, Old A&D, 7,9:05 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Intational students recreation night from 7 to 10 p.m. at the
ColisEn.
SATURDAY
FILMS
Cinna II- Mutiny on the Bounty, Aud. A, Angell, 7,9:15.
Cirna Guild-Jamaica Inn, Old A&D, 7,9:05 p.m.
EVENTS
Migan vs. Ohio State football, 1p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Pory reading at Pendleton Center, Michigan Union, second floor, 2
p.m.
MEETINGS
Weiey oundation-Ann Arbor War Tax Dissidents, Brown Bag
lunch602 E. Huon, noon.
SUNDAY
films
Cinenal-Les Enfants Terribles, Aud. A., Angell, 7, 9p.m.
Cinenauild-Ulysses, Old A&D, 7, 9:30 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Univeity Club-"Brunch on the Terrace," flutist Nancy Waring
and haist %rochelle Martinex-Moilleseaux perform, 1st floor,
Michigi Union, 10a.m., and noon (for reservations, call 763-2236).
Metoolitan Community Church service, 3 p.m., fellowship hour,
4:30 p, 1679 Broadway.
"Nae Prepares for Winter" walk at 1 p.m. with the Washtenaw
Count arks and Recreation Commission.
Ecse Jazz-Ann Arbor Jazz Workshop Advanced Session,
Andeon Room D, Michigan Uion, 3:30 p.m.
MONDAY
FILMS
A Arbor Film Co-op-Dr. X, 7 p.m., Mystery of the Wax Museum,
8:1ud. A, Angell.
Nlear Concerns Film Series-"The Last Slide Show", Michigan
Uni, 7:30 p.m.
MEETINGS
An Arbor Chapter of the Indoor Light Gardening Society of
Anrica, meets at 7:30, followed by a film called "Indoor Gardening"
ana discussion about lights for growing at 8 p.m.
SPEAKERS
1w School Senate and Michigan Student Assemble present Rep.
Pe-y Bullard at 3:30 p.m. in room 116, Hutchins Hall speaking on
"1hgan Political Forecast Following the 1978 Election."
bb Hauert, Don Coleman-"Marx at Michigan? Part 5," 802
Mroe, 8 p.m."
t-ew Swartz III on "Advanced Spitbol Usage" at the North Campus
Coiputing Center, 7:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
lusic School-American Trio, Rackham, 8 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
wottish Country dancing at Xanadu Co-op, 1811 Washtenaw, 7:30-
9: p.m.
01 the outside
1r those staying in the Ann Arbor or Detroit area over the
Thaksgiving holiday, it will be mostly cloudy today with a chance of
ligI snow. The high should be in the low to mid 30s with a low tonight
nea 20. Northern lower Michigan will also be under the clouds with a
chance of some more snow and a high near 30. Fr the U.P., it will

likewise be cloudy with a chance of snow and a high in the low to mid
20s If you're travelling to other parts of the naton, here's what the
weather will be like:
City-Forecast ' High Low
Atlata-Partly cloudy...................... .........63 44
Bosun-Cloudy.....................- ............43 29
Buffalo-Snow ..................... .. .................30 24
Chcago-Snow................. . ...............34 30
Cltveland-Snow ..................................44 34
Cdumbus-Cloudy..............................45 37
Detroit-Snow ............... ........... ..........34 27
Honolulu-Cloudy .................... .................88 73
Indianapolis-Cloudy ...................... .........43 37
Kansas City-Cloudy.................... ........32 26
Los Angeles-Rain..................-.........-....64 54
Miami Beach-Pt. Cloudy.........................80 78
Milwaukee-Cloudy ................................28 24
Minneapolis-Pt. Cloudy..........................17 7
New York-Cloudy ..............................49 36
Philadelphia-Cloudy............................50 34
Pittsnurgh-Snow .....................---,...............44 34
St.Louis-Cloudy........... ....................38 34
Washington-Pt. Cloudy..........................55 41
40t30 o 20 fi 3

By CAROL KOLETSKY
On the first day of classes this fall, 18
freshpersons received a startling
introduction tothe School of Natural
Resources: they were instructed to
plan, within one week, their own field
trip 200 miles north to the Pigeon River.
On September 15, the students headed
for a point of the river near Gaylord, 50
miles south of the Mackinac Straits.
They planned to study, on a practical
level, a variety of problems related to
natural resources.
"IS THIS the way all classes are
run?" was the typical response of the
initiates to "Frosh Discovery," an
experimental introductory course.
While most courses use the standard
lecture-discussion procedure, "Frosh
Discovery" is based on a teaching
method called "guided design."
Students learn by working in gorups to
solve case studies through analysis and
by playing the role of resource
manager. Teachers, when necessary,
facilitate decision-making.
"Guided design" is built around a
case study of the Pigeon River County
State Forest because the area is the site
of major conflicts between oil
developers and environmentalists.
The course was designed by Dale
McCollough, a specialist in Wildlife
Ecology with the School of Natural
Resources since 1966, and Ron Rollet, a
special scientist working on natural
resource issues.
"WE DESIGNED the course to get

first-year students involved in the
school from the beginning, to give them
a chance to find out if natural resources
is their bag," said McCullough.
"In a school like NR, freshmen are
about invisible," said Rollet. "They
take most of their courses in LS&A, so
that by the time they take NR courses
in their junior year, they find out it's not
what they want."
In one area and in one weekend, the
students saw how all environmental
issues relate. They learned one cannot
understand the impact of oil drilling
without examining recreation; one
cannot examine elk trees without
examining forest management; and
to examine management, one must also
examine the political process.
"IT WAS ABRUPT, but it was worth
A poll taken by the Air Transport
Association shows that 67 per cent of all
adult men have flown in airplanes,
while 59 per cent of women have
traveled by air.
TILE MICH1IGAN DAILY
Vo(,~lme LXXXIX, No. 66
Wednesday, Novenber 22, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters): $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through
Saturday morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7,00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

it in the end," said freshman John
Weiland. "We developed a fondness for
the area, and the greatest part of the
class is that we can see where we're
going."
Freshwoman Susan Bloomfield said,
"I was impressed with it because it's a
rare that you can get such an
incredible introduction to a field of
study at this level. We were exposed to
the real situations which on a
freshperson level usually are not
encountered."
According to McCullough and Rollet,
the faculty has observed the
experiment with enthusiasm, and is
certain to approve it as part of the
curriculum for all incoming
freshpersons beginning in natural
resources next year.
IN FACT, "Guided design may affect

all students in the.school in the near
future. Plans to design- a similar
prograam at all levels and to introduce
courses such as "Sophomare and
Junior Discovery" are expected.
Like "Frosh Discovery", these
courses will have students working
together and with NR faculty on
various projects, using role-playing,
actual environment impact statements,
and all of the tools with which a
professional in natural resources has to
be familiar.
McCullough and Rollet emphasized
the most important understanding to be
gained from "Frosh Discovery" as
recognition of the need to work for the
environment, and the motivation to
study natural resources at an early
undergraduate level as a stepping stone
to a career, rather than to simply fulfill
requirements.

--- U

ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S

1940

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
An American reporter in Europe becomes involved in finding the where-
abouts of a kidnapped Dutch diplomat as Europe moves towards war in the
late 1930's. Hitchcock considers the special effects in this movie to be among
his finest. Starring JOEL McCREA, LARAINE DAY, GEORGE SANDERS.
FRI: THE THIRD MAN
SAT: Hitchcock's JAMAICA INN
SUN: ULYSSES
TUE: A STAR IS BORN

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & :05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

This Week at CINEMA II:

Jean Cocteau s

1946

Beauty and the Beast
A visually stunning rendition of the proverbial story"of beauty taming-and
eventually loving-the beast. Displayed with Cocteau's unique blend of fantasy
and surrealism, this film remains one of the masterpieces of modern cinema.
With JEAN MARAIS and JOSETTE DAY. "A brilliant example of what cameras
can do with a poet in charge. . ."-Newsweek. French with subtitles.
Friday, Nov. 24 7 & 9 pm
Clark Gable & Charles Laughton in
Mutiny on the Bounty
The perfect adventure picture aboard the H.M.S. Bounty. CLARK GABLE is none
other than the chief engineer, Fletcher Christain. CHARLES LAUGHTON stars
as the symbol of vicious naval discipline-the fated Captain Bligh. A stirring
saga of the sea; savagely exciting, filled with desperate courage. Academy
Award for Best Picture.
Saturday, Nov. 25 7 & 9:15 pm

Jean-Pierre Melville's

1950

Les Enfants Terribles
Poet-filmmaker Jean Cocteau nersnnallv chose Melville to direct this story
about the beauty of the shared disorder and confused narcissism of a brother
(EDOUARD DERMITHE) and sister (NICOLE STEPHANE) whose fate is one of
inescapable self-destruction. Narration by Cocteau. "The music (Bach-Vivaldi)
is one of the few effective film usages of great music."-New Yorker.
Sunday, Nov. 26 7+& 94pm
All films at ANGELL HALL AUD. "A"
Wed.-Nov. 29-WOMAN IN THE DUNES
At MLB

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