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November 14, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-14

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Page 2-Tuesday, November 14, 1978-The Michigan Daily

FOCUS HOPE FOUNDER DISCUSSES GOV'T AID PROGRAMS:
Group feeds Detroit's starving

By STEVEN SHAER
When it comes to hunger and starvation in the
world, chances are most people think of places such
as Bangladesh and India.
But Eleanor Josiatis, speaking last night as part of
a four-day hunger program initiated by the campus
Committee Concerned with World Hunger, said there
are more than 130,000 malnourished people living in
the Detroit area alone.
"WE IN AMERICA have not come to the moral
commitment that people have a right to food,"
Josiatis, co-founder of Focus Hope. The organization
was founded to feed the hungry in Detroit. Josiatis
said it feeds 35,000 of the city's under-nourished every
month.
Talking about the hunger problem in Detroit, she
told more than 40 people at the School of Public
Health, "It is real. It is ugly in the city. There are
over 50,000 senior citizens living in Detroit below the
poverty line."
Josiatis said that, 'though the federal government
has several assistance programs for those who are

indigent, many whb need aid don't know how or don't
want to put up with the red tape to get it.
"IN APPLYING for aid, who would know that you
need your utility bills for the last six months, proof of
income, if any, bank books, birth certificate of you
and your children, doctors bills, registration from
your car, rent receipts from your apartment, (and)
certificate of marriage?" Josiatis asked.
She said her group works with health clinics and
Medicaid doctors in the city in its attempt to feed
Detroit's hungry.
"An individual is examined and if it is found they
are malnourished the doctor writes a prescription, a
prescription for food," she stated.
"ABOUT EIGHT YEARS ago we were told about a
pilot program that was started by the Department of
Agriculture to aid pregnant women and their
children. Enough food was sent to the Detroit area to
feed 3,000," Josiastis said.
"The problem was that the train carrying the food

did not come into Detroit, so people had to be driven
to pick the food up. We engineered a volunteer
program and transported the people to the food.
Secretary (Earl) Butz said that was nice work we did
but now the program was over."
Josiastis emphasized that it took extensive work on
the part of Focus Hope and volunteers to gather
enough signatures from businessmen, churches, the
mayor and the U.S. senators from Michigan in order
to pressure the government to send more food.
"WE SENT THE signatures to President Ford and
he overruled Butz but it took two and a half years."
Josiastis said that hunger causes defects in brain
development of young children.
"Scientists say there is a direct correlation bet-
ween hunger and learning capabilities. In this coun-
try there are a million children suffering from stun-
ted brains due to lack of proper nourishment when
they were young," Josiatis said.

IWs for a good cause, really
These two women were among the hordes of joyful, betogaed revellers at Saturl
day night's toga party, sponsored and hosted by Mosher Jordan Hall. The events
which also featured a mock slave auction, was planned as a fundraiser for Ann
Arbor's Ozone House, a center for juvenile runaways.
Liquor law fight expected

I.

U

CL

RICALS

WE NEED A UNION-VOTE "YES" FOR OCC NOV. 13-17

September's annual inflation rate was'
this year. We can buy less today than
increase,

12.7%-double the average "merit" increase
in January 1978, even with the "merit"

LANSING (UPI) - State House
Speaker Bobby Crim said yesterday
that the upcoming lame-duck, five-
week session of the legislature,
featuring fights over teen-age drinking
and other heated issues is "going to be
compact, it's going to be complex and
it's going to be controversial.
Crim said he has no preference on
whether violations of the drinking law
are punished as a criminal matter or
through a token fine as some cities are
proposing to do.
"IT' A LOCAL decision on how you
face that one," he said.
He added, however, that he expects a
move in the legislature to prevent local
units from easing punishment for teen-

age drinkers.
The legislature will have to act.
rapidly to adopt measures enforcing
the new 21-year-old drinking age which
takes effect Dec. 22, said Crim, who
made no secret of'his own dislike of the
increase.m
CRIM SAID he expects a compromise
on the welfare abortion issue, but cons
ceded he does not know how it will be
accomplished.r
Crim also said critics will have no
problem blocking recent transportation
tax hikes and forcing a referendum, but
added that in the meantime, Michigan
residents will get a graphic demon-
strations of why the increases are
needed.

We needn't put up with this for
union and demand and begin to win
" a large wage increase
* cost-of-living allowance
" management-paid coverage of
outpatient, dental, and optical care,
and prescription drugs
" more sick and vacation days, and the
addition of personal days

much longer. We can build a strong, democratic

" protection from management's
discrimination

racial

" protection from layoffs and speedup
" an improved pension plan fully-paid
by management
" a shorter work week
" and much, much more!

Earn 8 Credits This Spring
in NEW HAMPSHIRE
THE NEW ENGLAND
LITERATURE PROGRAM

We CAN stop the decline in our working conditions and living standards.'
We CAN begin to win some of the improvements we urgently need-with a union.
A DEMOCRATIC UNION MAKES US STRONG!
Vote "YES" for OCC!
THIS AD SPONSORED BY CAMPUS LABOR SUPPORT GROUP (CLSG)

MASS
TUES.

MEETING
NOV. 14

for more in formation
PROF. WALTER CLARK
Dept. of English
764-0418 or 761-9579

8 Apm
229 Angell Hall

MOWN

Treat yourself

.to an
awardMwinning*

44

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