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November 04, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-04

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, November 4, 1978-P

1I
ATM:
a ~ SEEMEV4S A1PEN CALLZ t~lJY
Study halls galore
:' Bureaucratic hassles within the University have delayed the
ivailability of evening study halls in Angell hall, but officials say the
rooms will be ready for use on Monday. The four classrooms-4004,
4007, 4068, and 4205 Angell Hall-will be open for study from 5:00 p.m.
until midnight, and hopefully will alleviate overcrowding problems in
UJniversity libraries. And there's more good news. Bland Leverette,
'"#he administrave manager for space and equipment in the literary
college, said food and drink will be allowed in the study halls.
1S
Canham 'hoops'it up
The Michigan-Notre Dame. basketball game at the Pontiac
Silverdome isn't until March, but University ticket master Don Can-
I,ham can hardly wait for the whistle to blow. Checking out the 82,000
seat arena Thursday, Canham was caught drooling over anticipated
icket sales by Detroit News sports columnist Joe Falls. "All I know is
when we leave here we're going to leave with a lot of money," Canham
gleefully calculated as he rubbed his hands together. By the way,
University students will have to pay the same price for tickets as any
other Joe attending the game. But Don need not worry; he's been
known to have a few extras at times. Quick Don, no one's lookin'!
Buckeye body language
Although the Big Ten Conference is no longer the "Big Two and
Little Eight" the hatred between Michigan and Ohio State is as
healthy as ever. A Columbus prints company is offering Buckeye fans
"the t-shirt that says it all." It's a red t-shirt with gray print
proclaiming "Beat, curse, stomp, kill, maim, destory, massacre,
eliminate, atrash, thrash, annihilate, wipe out, pulp, pound, squash,
whip, whup, exterminate, liquidate, cream, crinkle, cripple, murder,
mash, smash, total, quarter, crunch, flay, flog, fight, throttle, insult,
hurt, harass, harm, bludgeon, violate, vex, curse, ax, besmirch,
brutalize, snap, twist, dislocate . . . & finish Michigan." For more
profane fans, an adults-only shirt is available with a different, yet
unspecified, final action verb.
Take Ten
An estimated 1,500 to 2,000 students massed in front of President
Fleming's house on Nov. 4, 1968 and demanded that he end war
research at the University. The protesters also demanded that the
University sever all ties with corporations that produce war products,
abolish all entrance requirements, and give students a fairer voice in
school affairs. Fleming met with the group and said, "All war
researh has both military and civilian applications."
Happenings
FILMS
Cinema Guild-The Seduction of Mimi, 7,9:05 p.m., Old A&D.
Cinema II-The 7 Year Itch, 7, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Mediatrics-They Shoot Horses, Don't They? 7, 9:15 p.m., Nat.
Sci. Aud.
Couzens Film Co-op-Silent Movie, 8, 10 p.m., Couzens cafeteria.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-13th Annual Tournee of Animation, 7,
8:40, 10:20 p.m., Aud. 3, MLB.
PERFORMANCES
PTP--"California Suite," 8 p.m., Power Center.
R.C. Players-"Endgame," along with three short works by
Beckett, 8 p.m., R.C. Aud., East Quad.
Celebrants-"Godspell," 8 p.m., Holy Trinity Chapel, 511 W.

Forest, Ypsilanti.
$hgwcase Theatre-"Blood Wedding," 8 p.m., Trueblood, Frieze.
MUSKET-"'M.an of .La Mancha," 8 p.m., Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Wind ensemble-"Masterworks for Wind," 8 p.m., Rackham.
Paul Siebel, singer, songwriter, 9 p.m., Ark.

VANCE MEDIATOR FOR RENEWED TALKS

Pact to center on wes

WASHINGTON (AP)-The Israeli-
Egyptian peace pact will confront
directly the issue of future decisions on
the West Bank and Gaza Strip,
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance said
yesterday.
Vance said Egypt and Israel would
exchange documents establishing the
"timing and modalities" for beginning
negotiations on setting up an
autonomous Palestinian entity in the
territory.
THE QUESTION OF whether to link
the peace treaty with the more complex
and sensitive West Bank and Gaza
issues has been the most difficult hur-
dle in the talks thus far. Vance's
statement at a news conference yester-
day was the first public commitment
that the pact will establish a link bet-
ween the issues.
Egypt has insisted on such linkage,
while Israel has maintained that the
West Bank and Gaza talks are a
separate matter..

Vance indicated the link may be con-
tained in an exchange of letters dealing
"with the question of the timing and
modalities of addressing the issue of
carrying out the provisions of the
general framework."
BY "GENERAL FRAMEWORK,"
Vance referred to that part of the Camp
David agreement that deals with set-
ting up a Palestinian government in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip, areas which
Israel occupied in 1967. It is a problem
that has bedeviled Middle East
peacemakers for more than 10 years.
Thus far, only Egypt has indicated it
will participate in the negotiations.
Other Arab states have said the
framework does not provide the
specific guarantees they want of com-
plete Israeli withirawal from the cap-
tured territory and the return of Arab
Jerusalem. The United States has
sought unsuccessfully to persuade Jor-
dan to join the talks.
VANCE SAID IT was his belief that

the negotiations on the West Bank and
Gaza could go forward with only the
Israelis, the Egyptians and those
Palestinians who could *be persuaded to
join the Egyptian delegation.
"We would hope that as the
discussions got under way, we would
begin to find people beginning to par-
ticipate through consultation with those
Palestinians and Egyptians involved in
the negotiations. There is, in my
judgment, increasing interest in how
this process is going to work," Vance
said.
Vance said the United States has
made no commitment yet to finance
Israel's withdrawal from the Sinai,
which is supposed to take place in
stages after the Egypt-Israeli treaty is
signed.
HE CONFIRMED THAT Prime
Minister Menachem Begin is asking for
a 25-year loan, which informed sources
say would amount to about $3.3 billion,
*to pay for the removal of settlers and
the cost of new bases for Israeli troops.
"We said we shnuld take the matter
under consideration. It will require we
careful study," Vance said.
Vance said that he and Begin did not
resolve the dispute over the plan to ex-
pand its West Bank settlements, which

:
Bank
the United States considers illegal. "It
remains a question for discussion bet-'
ween us," he said.
Vance said there were still
unresolved issues in the Egypt-Israeli
negotiations, but he added that steady
progress was being made. The
negotiations continued Friday.
Other sources indicated the treaty
was almost complete. Israeli Defense
Minister Ezer Weizman has flown to
Jerusalem to brief the Israeli Cabinet
on the pact.
Daily Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4.1978
SUMMER PLACEMENT
:32001 SAB 76:3-4117
The Bristol Regional Environmental Center.
Conn.: Openings for interns in the field of
environmental education. Must have background1r
natural sciences. Deadline Dec. 1. Further details,
available.
Forestry Service/Fish & Wildlife Service: Filirig'
date Dec. 1 through Jan. 15. Further information and.
applications available.

League manager
frets over stolen flag

By JOE VARGO
The significance of a stolen flag
might not appear to be great in this
world of tax revolts, inflation and
energy shortages. But that isn't the
case at The Michigan League.
It's been two weeks since the maize
and blue flag-believed to be the only
University flag flying on campus--was
stolen from the flagpole at the League.
And League manager Patricia Lawson
is still very upset.
"I NEARLY CRIED when I found out
it was stolen," she said.
Lawson has good reason to be upset.
When she came here in 1977, she
thought it would be a good idea to have
the flag flying on campus. Flagpoles
are expensive, however, and the budget
wouldn'T ALLOW FOR SUCH A
LUXURY. A flagpole finally became
available when The University pur-
chased St. Joseph's Hospital.
"After we got the pole, I contacted
the alumne group and Alva Gordon Sink
to see if they would make us a flag,"
said Lawson. "Rather than sell us the

m

flag, however, they donated it to us as a
present for The League's 50th anniver-
sary."
THE FLAG APPEARED on October
18. "I was so proud to see it go up after
all that time and effort," said Lawson.
"I had decided to put floodlights around
it and leave it flying around the clock. It
would never come down."
But it did come down. Sometime bet-
ween Saturday, October 21 and Mon-
day, October 23 someone either shin-
nied the pole or used a ladder to reach
the flag. Although campus security and
local police were called, no trace has
been found of the flag. And Patricia
Lawson remains upset.
"I really feel bad about it," said
Lawson. "It's not that we can't buy
another one, because we can. But this
one was a gift to us, and, as such, it held
sympblic value. It took over a year to
raise that flag, and I believe it was the
first.flag flying on campus. Now, when
the League celebrates its 50th anniver-
sary in May, it won't be around."

Daily phoneNumbers:
Billing-764-0550
Circulation-764-0558
Classifieds-764-0557
Display-764-0554
News and
Happenings-764-0552
Sports-764-0562

I

This space contributed by the publisher as a public service.

UAC Medlatrics
PRESENTS:
THEY SHOOT HORSES, ON'T ThEY
(Sidney Pollack, 1969) Director Pollack, using Horace McCoy's novel, puts
Jane Fonda and Michael Sarrazin on the dance floor to the goading of Gig
Young, the cynical promotor, and comes up with some of the most memorable
screen performances ever. "I was moved, then shaken by the beauty and
genius of Horace McCoy's metaphor. Two people circling endlessly around a
dance floor, the girl, tough and scared and vulnerable, spitting out 'Christ'
as an epitaph at every new evidence that God did not exist. In the stages of
the marathon with death hovering everywhere, the survivors make us rejoice
for all those '30's families that hung out together through the incredible
squalor of the period."-Andrew Sorris, Village Voice.
Sat., Nov. 4 7:00& 9:15
Nat. Sci. Aud. Admission $1.50

R.C. Players preseits
ENDGAME
and other short works
by SAMUEL BECKETT

L~eukema
4I's no. lonrger
a death sentence.'

NOV.

2,

3,4

& 9,10,11

SPEAKERS
International Trade Symposium-"Anti-dumping Law Policy and
Implementation," 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., Hutchins Hall, Law Quad.
Stearns Lecture/Concert-Chung-shu Chang, "Peking Opera:
Song, Dance and Gesture,'8 p.m., Stearns Bldg., North Campus.
Birth Control Education Seminar-"Sexuality with
Responsibility:. Developing a School Program," noon, Washtenaw
Intermediate School District Bldg.
MEETINGS
Folklore Society-Square, Contra Dance, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill, free
admission.
Eclipse Jazz-"Ann Arbor Jazz Workship: Beginners Session,"
3:30-5:30 p.m., Anderson Room, D, Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Football-broadcast, UM vs. Iowa: 91.7 FM, 1:45 p.m.
Friends of Matthaei Botanical Gardens-Annual Fall Sale:
Plants, Herbal Products, Botanical Gifts, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., lobby,
Gardens.
Pendleton Center-"Rhyme Space Poetry Readings," 2 p.m., 2nd
floor, Union.
UAC/Union Programming Committee-Mini-course on Ballroom
Dancing, beginning November 8,7-9:30 p.m., sign up at Ticket Central
in the Union before Nov. 8.
Ethics, Humanism, and Medicine-Last chance to register for the
conference, Nov. 11, 8-4:30 p.m., Public Health Building, call 764-6263
for registration information.

8pm $1.50 East-Quad

i

TMANN THEARES
F4X GET WiN
MAPLE VILLAG SHOPPIN CENER

SNEAK PREVIEW
Saturday night
Only of "MAGIC"
at 8:00
SHOWTIMES
IE'S FRIDAY
:XPRESS"0:30

When you were young, no form of
cancer terrified your parents more than
leukemia did.
Just fifteen years ago, a child with
leukemia could expect to live only months.
But, thanks to research, things have
changed.
Children who once lived months are
now living years. Many of them are grow-
ing up. Some are already adults, living
normal lives.
Did you ever wonder what the
American Cancer Society did with the
money you gave us? Well, some of it went
to leukemia research. And, if we had more
we could do more. Give to the American

AQATHAcn sries
L EATt1mENILE

SATURDAY.
1:30
4:00
6:30
9:05
Tickets on sale
15 minutes
prior to
showtime

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