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November 04, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-04

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Page 2-Saturday, November 4, 1978--The Michigan Daily
Church WorshipSerices

HOA to discuss 'U' offer

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
[236 Washtenaw Ct.
1ev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 p.m.-Evening Worship.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
12 E. Huron St.-063-9376
. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Remembering"
y Rev. Chester Loucks.
Student Fellowship Discussion: "The
ew Religious Consciousness and the
ecular University," at the Campus
enter.
1Ir.m.-A Bible Seminar "The Apo-
al se in Biblical & Modern Litera-
ur -Campus Center Lounge.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
* * *
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Surlday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Vegetarian Potluck Supper at 6 p.m.
Followed by a program and discus-
sion at 7:00 on "The Ethics of
Consumerism." Join us as we explore
together the ethical issues surrounding
our personal corporate patterns of
consumption.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and Jus-
tice-9:30 a.m.
Monday Night Bible Study on North
Campus-8:00 p.m.
Tuesday night study group on
Criminal Justice-7:30 p.m. in the
- Lounge.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon and 5:00 p.m.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Soilth State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
$JNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist. ,
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan ahd
sjonsorsviograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m..
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E: Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Broyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowski, Office Manager
Sunday-5:00-Song practice.
5:30-Worship Service. Followed by
shared meal.
* * *
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, Nov. 5-Topic
title: "Being Free" by Prof. Frithjof
Bergmann.
"Both teachers and learners go to
sleep at the post when there is no enemy
in the field."-John Stuart Mills.
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.

II
43Sj
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* * *
T PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
m M. Ferry
1R. Geider
am M. Patterson
vices of Worship:.
nday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Ifee hour at 12 noon.
ydent Fellowship meets at 4:00
esday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
in the French room.

By SHELLEY WOLSON
The House Officers Association
(HOA) will meet next Wednesday to
decide whether to accept the Univer-
sity's current contract offer or continue
contract negotiations with the Univer-
sity.
"We need to find out the sentiments of
the people-at-large," said HOA
president Harry Colfer. Colfer said the
HOA executive committee is divided on
the issue. "There's no clear consensus
at the present time," he said.
COLFER SAID he felt although the
University hadn't made any "dramatic
changes" in their contract offer, "it
seems that they've taken a step in the
right direction."
Colfer said the University promised
to look into HOA concerns, such as bet-
ter patient-care services and working
conditions. "The mere fact that they're
Early.
parole
threatened
(Continued from Page 1)I
crime by parolees in Michigan or any
other study, are ever cited by
proponents of Proposal B as indicating
the need for the proposal," said
Michigan's ACLU Executive Director
Howard Simon.
The measure's opponents also con-
tend the proposal would cost the
Department of Corrections an
additional $86 million. Simon said the
department, would have to provide
more space and food for the additional
state prisoners. He added the
corrections department estimates that
Proposal B would increase prison
population by approximately 4,000 in-
mates per year.
"UNDER THESE conditions, we are
creating a prison system with con-
ditions that will make it less likely that
those returned to society will be
rehabilitated and more likely that they
will commit additional crimes," said
Simon.
Patterson, who adiitted that the
proposal would force overcrowding in
many of the state's prisons, said he
preferred that consequence to the
possibility of endangering citizens'
lives.
"It is a hell of a lot better to have an
expensive situation than to take a chan-
ce on those criminals coming back to
hurt the people," said the Oakland
County prosecutor. "There is no price
you can put on the life of a human
being."
PERRY JOHNSON, the director of
the Michigan Department of Correc-
tions, criticized the Patterson proposal
because he said it removes the inmates'
incentive to behave properly in prison.
But Patterson answered by arguing
the incentive for prisoners would in-
stead be "to behave right to be released
at the end of your minimum sentence."
Johnson also argues that the "good
time" provisions are built into
Michigan law and trial judges have
been able to adjust their sentences to
those provisions.
"For example, they know that to keep
a person in prison for five years, they
must give a minimum sentence of
seven-and-a-half years," said Johnson.

going to spend some time and that they
recognize these things need to be im-
proved has some value," said Colfer.
The last HOA-University contract
expired August 31 and was extended on
a day-to-day basis until September 21

when HOA voted to terminate the
agreement. Negotiations have, con-
tinued, with' the last two sessions held
with a mediator from the
Michigan Employment Relations
Commission.

Daily Photo by CYRENA CHANG

*4
Use
Dailyx
"Classifieds
,

Rodney Saulsberry; an LSA senior and part-time musician, is perhaps strumming
out the jingle he wrote for Gov. Milliken's campaign.
NewCp op tu ne sitngs
praises of Milliken,

By RICHARD BERKE
The subject of the latest pop-soul
tune to hit Detroit radio airwaves isn't
love, sex, or a broken heart-it's
Governor William Milliken.
In an attempt to catch the ears of
young city voters, Milliken's reelection
camp is using a minute-long radio
commercial to demonstrate that though
the governor is 56, 'he relates to.
.younger "folk,
'THE SONG, written and sung by
University senior Rodney Saulsberry,
tells listeners that Milliken is the man
for them.
"Let's do it again. I'm talking about
wining with Milliken, he's the man we
need. Milliken for Michigan, everybody
come along. .:," the jingle suggests.
Saulsberry began the song-writing
project after Milliken's Wayne Coun-
try campaign co-chairperson, a per-
sonal friend, suggested he compose a
song to present at a Republican
political event. He spent the next two
months writing the song in between his
spring-summer term courses at the
University.
THE THEATER major said the
governor's campaign staff was so
pleased by the song that they had him
re-record it in a studio and, from there,
put it on the airwaves of WJLB, WCHB,
WJZZ, and WGPR radio.
The Detroit native, who bills himself
as a "versatile performer," doesn't
think the pop song format would work
for all candidates. He said since

Milliken's Democratic challenger,
William Fitzgerald, is 20 years the
governor's junior, he has less need to
target advertisements at young voters.
"Fitzgerald has a young guy imge,"
the 22-year-old performer said. "When
you think of Republicans, you don't
think of anything like this'(song) and
this sort of thing breaks the political
monotony.
BUT SAULSBERRY emphasized
that although he will vote for Milliken
on 'Tuesday, he alwaysl supports "the
best man" of any party and sees his
work on the advertisement as
apolitical.
"I just don't want to get into tle'
political thing," he remarked, adding
that the Milliken spot will be his first
and last political song.
At least, until he makes it big.
"I WANT TO be a star," Saulsberry
affirmed, saying whether he makes it in
acting or music is of no great concern.
Saulsberry has written several love
songs and ballads, but said his biggest
breaks were a short role in the film,
"Blue Collar" and a part in a national
Plymouth Volare television commer-
cial. He also played the role of MC in
UAC Musket's Cabaret, presented last
year on campus.
Saulsberry said he transferred into
the Literary College after two years at
the University Music School because,
"I decided classical music was not for
me."
As for his try at political songwriting,
Saulsberry said, "Right now this is
probably my favorite tune."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No. 51
Saturday, Novembe,4, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan .48109.E
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

EARL,
GREENE\
Democrat for U.S. Congress
SECOND DISTRICT
Paid for by Students for Greene, Women for Greene

---!

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Some years ago two young men studying for the Protes-
tant Christian ministry in one of Atlanta's prominent
Theological Schools told the writer that one of the professors
told his class that The Prophet Ezekiel was "neurotic." If my
understanding of that word Is correct It meant he was "a nut,
off his rocker," or more or less crazyl The New Testament
says of him that he was "a holy man of God, moved by The.
Holy Spirit." This wretch's unbelief turned out to be quite a
blessing to this party, for at the time his daily Bible reading
was in The Book of Ezekiel, and he began counting the times
that "Thus saith The Lord" appeared, or similar phrases that
Indicated or stated that God Himself was speaking. Counted
327 in Ezekiel.
There are 859 verses in the Book of Leviticus. 743 of these,
or about 86% are a direct quotation of God's speech. In
chapter 26 God uses the personal pronoun "I" forty times. In
viewo f the call n "Dray fo rPeace" that we hear and m en

sword. And five of you shall chase a hundred; and a hundred
of you shall put ten thousand to flight; and your enemies
shall fall before you by the sword. For I will have respect unto
you, and make you fruitful, and multiply you, and establish
my covenant with you ... and I will walk among you, and will
be your God, and ye shall be My people. But if ye will not
hearken unto Me ... If ye despise My statutes, or if your soul
abhor My judgments ... I will do this unto you ... I will set My
face against you, and ye shall be slain before your enemies;
they that hate you shall reign over you .,. I will make your
cities waste, and bring your sanctuaries (churches) unto
desolation ... I will bring the land into desolation: your
enemies that dwell therein shall be astonished at it ... Then
shall the land enjoy her sabbaths as long as it Ileth desolate,
and ye be in your enemies land; even then shall the land rest
and enjoy her sabbaths. As long as it lieth desolate it shall
rest. because it did not rest In vour sabbatha when va dwelt

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