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October 28, 1978 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-28

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, October 28, 1978-Page 7
U.S. stops Mideast
treaty negotiations

KEN RUSSELL'S

1970

WOMEN IN LOVE
ALAN BATES, OLIVER REED, GLENDA JACKSON, JENNIE LIN-
DEN, and ELEANOR BRAN in Russell's faithful adaptation of
Lawrence's powerful novel of two sets of cross-cutting loves.
A virtual textual of cinematic technique and a stunning film as
well. Russell's best film by for as a result of great casting and
acting. In color.

(Continued from Page 1)
expand the settlements was not "some
sort of ploy" to wreck the negotiations,
the official said.t
Dayan stressed two points in respon-
ding to reporters' questions in the lobby
of the State Department.
The first was that the United States
and Israel were in disagreement over
the settlements. "Each party main-
tained its own position," he said of his
meeting with Vance.
Dayan's second point was that
despite the squabble, Israel and Egypt
should be able to complete their
agreement, which would put an historic
Sea grant chief named
John Judd has been appointed
assistant director of the Great Lakes
and Marine Waters Center and the
Michigan Sea Grant Program at the
University.
In thisadualsappointment, Judd will
initiate and supervise Great Lakes
research and education for the
program, and carry out other ad-
ministrative and research duties for the
center.
"The role of Sea Grant," Judd said,
"is to form a bridge between the
researcher and the public. Sea Grant
Programs bridge that gap with
education, public information and with
advisory agents who work in com-
munities."

end to 30 years of hostility, restore
Egyptian control over all of Sinai and
establish relations between Cairo and
Jerusalem.
"I 'think we can go on with a peace
treaty," Dayan said firmly. "I think we
are negotiating with the Egyptians a
peace treaty."
Wo-man's
screa-ms
scare off
attacker
The screams of a 21-year-old woman
frightened off her would-be rapist early
Thursday morning, Ann Arbor Police
said.
The victim was reportedly asleep
when an unidentified man entered her
bedroom and bound her hands with a
towel. The woman screamed, waking
her roommate, and the intruder fled.
Police said that the incident, which
took place in the 400 block of Lawrence
Street, is still under investigation.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 A 9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

.I

n f l._

Mediatrics presents:

PLAY IT AGAIN SAM
(Herbert Ross, 1972). WOODY ALLEN plays p fanatical movie buff with a recurring halucination of his
idol, HUMPHREY BOGART, offering him advicH on how to handle domes. This occurs after his wife
leaves him for "insufficient laughter." He then turns to his married friends, and, of course, Bogart, for
help in establishing "meaningful" relationships with women. The final scene is a terrific take-off on
CASABLANCA'S classic ending, complete with roaring plane propellers, heavy fog and Bogart-type
trenchcoats. With DIANE KEATON.

SAT., OCT. 28

NAT. SC. AUD.

8:50 only

CASABLANCA
(Michael Curtiz, 1942). A tough HUMPHREY BOGART defies the Nazis and rekindles an old flame,
Ingrid Bergman. Taut, exciting and romantic. . . a real classic. CASABLANCA won three major Academy
Awards. Dedodeda-dedoa...

SATURDAY, OCT. 28
7 & 10:20 admission $1.50, $2.50 double feature

Nat. Sci. Aud.

AP Photo,
ISRAEL'S DEFENSE Minister Ezer Weizman, left, and Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan leave the State Department yesterday after speaking with Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance.
Sadat Begin
awared Nobel'

I
.
I
1
1

is more than just an ordinary paper. 5TuDEI F
It comes complete with all the inside PARK
info on University Affairs. From ad- LOITERING,
ministrative decisions to fraternity HTCNKN I,
antics you can count on the Daily to SANING
keep you informed. * LOADING,
LOOKING,
CALL 764-0558 to order your
inexpensive ($3.50 per session)
summer subscription immediately.

f 'I
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1.25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. tl 1:3b P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon ti 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student $ Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtirne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

(Continued from Page 1) .
Sadat's precedent-setting visit to
Jerusalem last November opened a
breach in a "psychological wall" that
has separated the two countries for a
generation. It added that "the positive
initiative taken by U.S. President Car-
ter also has played a great role" in the
peace efforts.
Israel Radio reported that Begin, ob-
serving the Jewish sabbath at home,
was "extremely excited" about the
award but would not violate the sabbath
by commenting publicly on his prize.
Sadat, at his Barrages villa outside
Cairo, also had no immediate public'
comment.
IN WASHINGTON, Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance, who has worked
long hours with the two men in the
search for peace, issued a
congratulatory statement saying, "We
are proud that the United States has
been so closely associated with their
achievement."
Israeli Deputy Prime minister Yigael
Yadin said, "More than anyone else
they deserve this prize and I hope their
efforts will lead to the signing of a
peace treaty."
Some Israelis sounded a negative
note. Right-wing Parliament member
Geula Cohen, who says Begin's con-
cessions have gone too far, commented,
"I want peace, not peace prizes, and
what Begin is doing will not bring
peace."
At the other end of the political spec-
trum, a leader of Israel's Peace Now
movement, Ludi Feller, said, "Let's
hope Begin lives up ,to the honor by
doing the other things that are needed
for peace."
THE ARAB WORLD was largely
silent. Most Arab states oppose Sadat's
bilateral talks with Israel, saying a
separate peace will leave unresolved a
central issue in the Mideast, the
political future of the Palestinians.
Sadat, 59, and Begin, 65, were selec-
ted from among 50 individuals and
organizations nominated for the peace
prize. The Salvation Army was known
to have been among the other can-
didates.
The peace prize, one of five annual
awards bequeathed by dynamite inven-
tor Alfred Nobel at the turn of the cen-

tury, was worth $165,000 this year. The
peace prize committee is appointed by
the Norwegian Parliament. The other
prizes are awarded by Swedish com-
mittees.
IT WAS KNOWN that former
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger had
nominated Sadat for the prize, and that
two West German legislators had
nominated Sadat and Begin as joint
candidates. Kissinger shared the 1973
peace prize with North Vietnames
Foreign Minister Le Duc Tho for
negotiating a cease-fire agreement in
Vietnam. Tho declined the award.
Last year's winner was Amnesty In-
ternational, the London-based human
rights organization. Mairead Corrigan
and Betty Williams, founders of the
Peace People movement in Nortehrn
Ireland, won the 1976 prize.
During the 1940s, Sadat, who favored
the use of political terrorism against
Egypt's British rulers, was jailed three
times, escaping once and remaining at
large as a fugitive. He helped Gamal
Abdel Nasser plan the 1952 Egyptian
revolution, then served President
Nasser in various capacities as Egypt
fought two wars with Israel. As Egyp-
tian president in 1973, he launched a
third war against Israel.
BEGIN, TOO, battled the British, but
his was a fight to establish a Jewish
state in Palestine. His Irgun guerrillas
in 1946 blew up a wing of Jerusalem's
King David Hotel, then British
headquarters, killing 95 Britons, Arabs
and Jews.
After the birth of Israel, Begin
became a hard-line leader of the right-
wing political opposition. After 28 years
in politics, his Likud bloc unseated the
Labor government in 1977. Begin came
to power as the embodiment of a tough
line toward the Arabs, but he then
presided over a historic turn toward
peace.
Sadat and Begin are the first
Mideast political leaders to win the 77-
year-old Nobel Peace Prize.
Americans have won more than any
other nationality, taking the prize 16
times. Among the winners were
Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and
Woodrow Wilson.

.. ..... ...

Now Showing Central Campus Butterfield Theatres
______ ______ __--a

-r' "

-

I

WEDNESDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY"
$1.25 UNTit 5:30

MONDAY IS
"GUEST NIGHT"
TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FOR PRICE OF ONE

l

ADULT MAT. 2.50
FVES. & HOL..3.00
CHILD
14 & UNDER. 1.25

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CONTINUOUS TICKET SALES - COME WHEN YOU WANT
C NTUS REENS- ALE S COUSTHEO AT E
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE AS LATE AS SHOWTIME
SPECIAL ADMISSION PRICE' DAYS

The newly reorganized
University of Michigan
BAROQUF TRI0
Prof. KEITH BRYAN, flute
Prof. JEROME JELINEK, cello
Prof. ARNO MARIOTTI, oboe
Prof. MARILYN MASON, harpsichord
assisted by
Prof. ROSEMARY RUSSELL, mezzo-soprano
performing works of

Ti

Mon. -Tue. -Thur'.-Fri. 7:30-9:30
Sat.-Sun.-Wed.
1 :253:305:30-735-9:45
Richard
Dreyfuss a
Moses Wine
Private Detective.

U Mon.-Tues.-Thurs.-Fri. 7:30-9:30
3Sat. -Sun. -Wed. 1:30-3:30-5:30-
7 :30-9:30
the West Was woBy Men
* Andl Chollneed By Women.

IA

...so go figure
B&Fix

A STORY OF LOVE
AND FREEDOM!
JAMES JANE JASON
CAAN FONDA ROBARDS
cHoa ntdAr
IpctUitdAtit

lI

r

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