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October 28, 1978 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.,foge 6-Saturday, October 28, 1978-The Michigan Daily
0
S.N.: N. Korea has
tunnel under DMZ

PANMUNJOM, Korea (AP) - The
N. command accused North Korea
yesterday of drilling a tunnel under the
demilitarized zone separating North
,and South Korea that could accom-
fnodate a march by three or four
columns of fully armed combat troops.
The North Koreans responded that
'he tunnel was dug by South Korea.
;They said a tunnel is of little use in
modern warfare and that no sensible
'commander would think of digging one.
THE ACCUSATIONS came during a
four-hour meeting of the Korean
Military Armistice Commission in this
truce village.
American Rear Adm. Warren Hamm
:9r. proposed a joint investigation,4)
saying, "Let us go right now to the tun-
bel site which is within the DMZ. I have
Vehicles standing by. You and the rest
pf the world can see the truth of what I
have said. It is not a fabrication."
Maj. Gen. Han ju-kyong,
Pyongyang's chief delegate, refused.
Han said the U.N. charge was designed
o smear North Korea and cover up an
American and South Korean arms
buildup despite the Carter ad-
nistration's pledge to pull out
American troops. r
SOUTH KOREA and the United
1Mates have agreed to a phased with-
rawal of the 36,000 U.S. ground troops
South Korea by 1982.
< Hamm said the existence of the tun-

nel was confirmed Oct. 17 after an in-
tercept tunnel dug by the U.N. com-
mand, broke through into the secret
tunnel, ending a three-year search. He
said it is the third tunnel found since
1974 and was located about a mile from
the Panmunjom camp the United
Nations uses for Armistice Commission
talks with the communists.
The six-foot-wide, six-foot-high tunnel
was drilled through solid granite 73
yards below the surface and extended
at least 435 yards across the military
demarcation line, the U.N. commander
said.
HAMM SAID the command had
suspected the existence of the tunnel
since September 1974 when North
Korean defector Kim Pu-song reported
he had worked on a tunnel in that area.
The admiral backed up his statemen-
ts with charts, photographs and
videotapes showing how the latest tun-
nel was found, what the interior and ad-
jacent terrain looked like and with
testimony of the North Korean defec-
tor.
One American officer, a geologist
who worked on the search, said it is safe
to assume the North Koreans are
building more tunnels in the zone. He
said rumblings have been heard
coming from underground at several
locations.

HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY
S a t
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 at 9 p.m.
ADMISSION FREE if in Costume
Prizes for Best Costumes-
Judging atI Ipm

A fall facade Daily Photo by CYRENA CHANG
Countless shadows of leaves and branches transform an ordinary brick wall into marble. Is it a trick? No, just a touch of autumn magic.
DISOBEYED KELLEY'S ORDERS:
FBI officials destroyed files

611 CHURCH, NEAR S. University

995-5955

ROMAN POLANSKI: THE TENANT 1976
. Features some of the most chilling images ever to hit the screen.
Poa nski's most recent film in which he plays a timid file clerk who takes
the apartment of a woman who jumped to her death from it, and slowly
becomes convinced that his neighbors are driving him to become the dead
girl.
SUN: Roman Polanski's CUL DE SAC
TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL, AUD. A
CINEMA 7&9:15 $1.50
LOGO CONTESTI
Design logo for Cinemo i (to be used on our film schedules & posters)
& WIN free admission for two at all our winter films. DEADLINE Nov. 7th.
Send entries (as m y atyo n want) to LOGO CONTEST Cinema N, c/o 909
t Church St., Apt. No. 2, Ann Arbor, MI. 48104.
* SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperati8vpresents at MLB 3
z ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS
(Roger Corman, 1957) 7 only-MLB 3
Roger Corman plumbed the depths of our primal fears to produce this science fiction thriller. After all, we
have all dreoded an attack of the crabs Great acting aboundsith masterp eee including the giant
:$ a twenty-foot crab with a French accent. With RICHARD GARLAND and PAMELA DUNCAN
' THE CARS THAT EAT PEOPLE
(Peter Weis, 1974) 8:40 only-MLB 3
, Air bogs are no protection against THESE babies! Port science fiction, port block comedy, this macabre film
has been compared with NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD "Alarming and sardonic, raw but not unsophisticated,
4a genuine exploitation of one of those changelessly pastoral settings as a breeding ground for nightmares."
e -SIGHT AND SOUND. ANN ARBOR PREMIERE.
NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD
(George Romero, 1968) 10:20 only-MLB 3
A group of people trapped in a form house are surrounded by radioactive ghouls who hove come out of their
graves, murdering, mutilating, and eating human flesh row. More frightening than THE BIRDS, more shock-
ing than than HOUSE OF PSYCHOTIC WOMEN, more grotesque than FREAKS, more menacing than INVASION
OF THE BODY SNATCHERS, this movie is as horrifying a nightmare vision as one could hope to see on film.
Kill the brain and you kill the ghoul,"
Monday: John Ford's MY DARLING CLEMENTINE and RIO GRANDE
AMEN APPEL ARP
BAFKE TOMORROW#
CALDE
CHAGASUNDAY
CHAGA
CECNOCTOBER 29 th
DUPRE
DA LI Win Schuler's Marriott
FEAFLN3600 Plymouth Rd.
GOY GAITIS Ann Arbor, Mich.
HUR JANSEN
LIL LALANDE Ballroom
14AX MI RO MANE '
MOT NE IMAN I .
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RO RAUCH SHAHNF
-* SC SARIANiO ROTH
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OILS..... GRAPHICS..Antiq ILS
CHAMPAGNE.,
EXHIBITION 1:00PM.
AUCTION 2:30 PM.
FRAArqcIN aFRF

I

WASHINGTON (UPI) - One or more
FBI officials apparently disobeyed or-
ders from former director Clarence
Kelley and destroyed files that detailed
illegal FBI break-ins in the early 1970s,
court documents disclosed yesterday.
Defense lawyers, revedalinglhey had
been advised more than 47 FBI files on
the surveillance were missing, said
they would ask a federal judge to
dismiss conspiracy charges against
former FBI Director L. Patrick Gray
and two of his top lieutenants.
THOMAS KENNELLY, defense at-
torney for former FBI intelligence chief
Edward Miller, filed a dismissal motion
before Chief U.S. District Judge
William Bryant, arguing the missing
files might have contained evidence
clearing Miller.
Kennelly also asked Bryant to
schedule a hearing at which Justice
Department officials could explain the
destruction of evidence in the case.
Attorneys for Gray and Mark Felt,
the bureau's former No. 3 man, said
they either would join in Kennelly's ac-
tion or file their own motions.
GRAY, FELT and Miller are accused
of authorizing warrantless break-ins,
wiretaps, mail-openings and other sur-
veillance - known as "black bag"
operations - in an effort by the
bureau's "Squad 47" in New York to
trace the whereabouts of fugitives
suspected of terrorist bombings.
Francis Martin, a Justice Depar-
tment trial lawyer in the case, said,
"Obviously, we don't feel that what
happened should cause dismissal of the
case."
In a letter made public yesterday,
Martin advised defense lawyers that
prosecutors already had reviewed the
documents and removed those they
needed in the case before any files were
destroyed.
MARTIN'S LETTER also disclosed

that the Justice Department considered
taking action against an FBI section
chief, who retired recently, because he
bucked "specific instructions" from
Kelley and a top Justice Department of-
ficial in destroying the files in 1976.
Justice Department officials said no
prosecution of the retired official,
Robert Shackleford, is contemplated. It
is illegal to knowingly destroy evidence,
in a criminal case.
The development created a new snag
for prosecutors preparing for the

scheduled Jan. 22 trial of the three for-
mer FBI officials, charged with con-
spiring to violate the civil rights of
relatives and friends of the radical
Weatherman group.
The disclosure also raised questions
about the Justice Department's inter-
nal investigation of more than 60 agents
who participated in the illegal sur-
veillance.
Martin, in an interview, confirmed
the 47 files had been destroyed before
decisions were made on whom to seek

indictments against in the "black bag"
case - meaning Justice Department
investigators may not have had all
reports on the break-ins available when
deciding which FBI agents to
prosecute.
His letter also said other files may
have been destroyed "in the normal
course of business." Attorney General
Griffin Bell elected not to prosecute any
lower-level FBI employees, but still is
considering whether to take
disciplinary action againstm ore than
50 agents.

Ray lawyer says FBI killed King

WASHINGTON (AP)-Mark Lane,
lawyer for James Earl Ray, gave
Houseinvestigators yesterday what
was described as information that for-
mer and off-duty FBI agents
assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King.
Lane refused to disclose publicly
whatever evidence he might have. He
said he would if the House panel did not.
DELEGATE WALTER Fauntroy of
the District of Columbia, chairman of
the House assassinations subcommittee
investigating King's murder, said he
was disappointed. "My conclusion is
that there was no new evidence," Faun-
troy said.
The Rev. Ralph David Abernathy ac-
companied Lane to a meeting with
Fauntroy and Rep. Louis Stokes (D-
Ohio), chairman of the House
assassinations committee.
Afterward, Abernathy said: "The in-
formationx that Mr. Lane revealed is
that it was former FBI agents and off-
duty FBI agents who took the life of,Dr.
King."
ABERNATHY, WHOi s King's suc-
cessor as head of the Southern

Christian Leadership Conference, said
Lane contends the evidence shows that
Ray is innocent. But, said Abernathy,
"that is not my position."
"My position," Abernathy said, "is
that there was a conspiracy which may
have involved James Earl Ray but cer-
tainly there were other persons in-
volved in the conspiracy."
Ray pleaded guilty to killing King and
is serving a 99-year prison sentence,
although after his trial Ray almost im-
meditely recanted his guilty plea. King
was assassinated in Memphis April 4,
1968.
Lane and Abernathy were accom-
panied to the two-hour meeting by
comedian Dick Gregory and the Rev.

James Lawson.
Fauntroy told reporters his in-
vestigators are pursuing one lead
provided by Lane. He refused to
describe the lead, but said he does not
thinkany of it is new.
Fauntroy said he was disappointed
because "I was led to believe that there
would be names given us of persons
who were alleged to be involved in the
assassination." He said names were
mentioned but none was a possible con-
spirator.
The District of Columbia delegate to
the House said the committee will make
public evidence on all 21 conspiracy
allegations the committee has been in-
vestigating, but refused to say if they
contain any substance.

Health conference planned

A conference on "Planning Health
Career Programs in the Community
College" will be held Nov. 3-4 at the
University.
The sessions are designed to provide
community college faculty and staff
members with practical information on
how to initiate, plan, and evaluate
health careers programs.
To be held in Towsley Center for Con-
tinuing Medical Education, the meeting
will feature presentations by
authorities in nujrsing, hospital ad-
ministration, medicine and health
professions, and education.
Special emphasis will be given to the
role of government, the accreditation
process, financing, faculty, and student

recruitment, and related topics, The
conference is designed to enable the
participants to establish a plan for
beginning health careers programs in
their own institutions as well as im-
proving their existing skills.
The conference is being presented by
Washtenaw Community College of Ann
Arbor and the University's Medical
School and Community College
Keynote speaker is Dr. David
Hoover, deputy director of the Division
of Associated Health Professions in
U.S. Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare. He will discuss "Allied
Health Education: The Federal Per-
spective" at 7 p.m. Nov. 3 at Win
Schuler's-Mariott Inn.

"THE GREATEST MAGIC SHOW IN A QUARTER OF A CENTURY"-L.A TIMES

SUNDAY OCTOBER 29
2n m & 7nm

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